Discussion:
Assistance requested re: Parker, Jermy and Pakenham families of Norfolk and Suffolk
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p***@peterdale.com
2013-02-10 22:16:10 UTC
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Greetings,

I’m trying to more conclusively establish that my 13th-G-Grandfather Nicholas Parker (d 1496 in Honing, Norfolk) was married to Margaret Jermy (dau of John Jermy, Esq. of Bukenham Ferry, Norfolk and Metfield, Suffolk d. 1487) and that she was the mother of Nicholas’ son John Parker of Honing, Norfolk (d 1528 in London). I appreciate your patience in reviewing this inquiry as I have hit a bit of a brick wall!

The following written pedigrees, among others, state that Margaret Jermy was the wife of Nicholas Parker and, in the case of the Parker pedigree, that she was the mother of John Parker. Nicholas was previously married to a Margaret Thurston (dau of Edmund Thurston of Brundish, Suffolk) who died pre-1462. Nicholas had 3 daughters with Margaret Thurston named Alice (likely married to Henry Everard at the time of Edmund Thurston’s death in 1462), Elizabeth and Isabell.

Written Pedigrees

Parker – http://archive.org/stream/visitacionievisi32ryew#page/212/mode/2up

Jermy – http://archive.org/stream/visitacionievisi32ryew#page/172/mode/2up

Jermy – http://books.google.ca/books?id=u04EAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA50&dq=%22jermy%22+%22st.+aubin%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Xd5nT_zIEeOJ0QGI3Mn8CA&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22jermy%22%20%22st.%20aubin%22&f=false

Nicholas Parker was also a feoffee of John Jermy regarding land in Withersdale, Suffolk as evidenced in John’s 1487 IPM. (‘Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office’, (1898), Henry VII., Vol. I., published by Eyre and Spottiswoode, London, p. 140). Nicholas Parker, John Jermy and John’s 2 sons John and Thomas had certain other land transactions together and Nicholas’ son John Parker likewise appears to have had some land transactions with his purported Jermy cousins.

One item of particular interest is that in 1465 Nicholas Parker and a Thomas Mountgomery knight, were granted custody of the lands of Robert Pakenham upon his decease (c 1463) (Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office’, (1949), Vol. XX, Edward IV Henry VI 1461-1471, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office, London, pp.151-52).

Henry Pakenham, son of Robert, came of age in 1468 as per below:

C 140/30/71
Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series I, Edward IV
Pakenham, Henry. Proof of age Norf
8 Edw IV

Writ
Edward [IV] to the escheator in Norfolk.
Henry Pakenham, son and heir of Robert Pakenham, deceased, who held in chief of us on the day he died, says that he is of full estate and seeks from us the lands and tenements, which are of his inheritance and in the custody of Thomas Mongomery [sic], knight, and Nicholas Parker. We well that Henry, who was born at Shropham in the aforesaid county, and baptised in the church of the same vill, should prove his age before you.

In 1472 there is the following de Banco entry which related to certain Pakenham family property in Staffordshire. It references Nicholas Parker, his wife Margaret, and Henry Pakenham:

‘Collections for a history of Staffordshire’, Vol. 4, published by Kendal, pp. 179-180, states the following with respect to Nicholas Parker. It is of considerable importance as it would seem to confirm that Nicholas Parker was married a second time to a Margaret (I propose Margaret Jermy) after his first wife Margaret Thurston:

“De Banco [of the Bench]. Easter 12 E. IV. [1472].

Staff. John Harecourt, armiger, William Cumberford, William Offeley, John Olyver, Thomas Cook, of Stafford, and John Salter sued Nicholas Parker, of Honyng, armiger, and Margaret, his wife, and Henry Packenham for 5 messuages, 8 tofts, a watermill, 5 carucates of land, 42 acres of meadow, 34 acres of wood, and 74s. of rent in Weverston (Worston), Bescote, Blumenhill, Whitgreve, Eccleshale, Little Bruggeford, Colton, Charleton, and Mefford, and the advowson of the church of Blumenhille, as their right and inheritance by the King's writ of right, John Harecourt, the son and heir of Robert Harecourt, knight, the lord of the fee, having remitted his court to the King, and they stated they had been seised of the tenements and advowson in the present King's reign, etc., and they offered to prove their right, etc.

The defendants appeared by attorney and defended their right, and called to warranty Robert Kyng, who was present in court and warranted the tenements and advowson to them. The plaintiffs then sued Robert Kyng as tenant under the warranty and repeated their plea. Robert defended his right and asked that a verdict might be taken, etc., and the plaintiffs then asked for an adjournment, which was granted. The defendant afterwards made default, and judgement was given in favor of the plaintiff's, m. 121, dorso. (1) ...

Staff. Nicholas Parker, armiger, sued Richard Fernehaugh, late of Aston, yoman, to render to him a reasonable account for the time he was the receiver of his money. Richard did not appear, and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest and produce him on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, m. 209, dorso.

(1) It must be remembered that all these suits on a writ of right of this date are collusive suits to obtain a recorded judgement.”

(source: http://archive.org/stream/newcollectionsforhi04stafuoft/newcollectionsforhi04stafuoft_djvu.txt)

Henry Pakenham’s IPM from 1483 states the following with respect to Nicholas Parker, among others:

“p. 24, Appendix E

C 141/3/34
Chancery: Inquisitions Post Mortem, Series I, Richard III
Pakenham, Henry Counties: Norf
1 Ric III

Writ
Richard [III] to the escheator in the county of Norfolk. Henry Pakenham, deceased.
Westminster, 23 August in the first year of the reign [1483].

Inquisition
[Generally legible, but with a small faded and stained section on the right.]
[Delivered into court] 21 October 1 Richard III [1483] by the hands of William Corbryge.
Norfolk.
At Hengh'm, 4 October 1 Richard III [1483].

Before Thomas Brampton', escheator in the aforesaid county, by the oath of Andrew Retherhithe, Alexander Ocley, Edmund Cowper', William Daine, Thomas Vincent, [.... ....] William Whipp', John Lichefeld', William Skyrbek', John Cok', Thomas Rypford', John Auger, John Dykeman and John Ledes.

They say that Henry Pakenh'm named in the writ was seised of 1 acre of land in Snyterton' in his demesne
as of fee and that Richard [?H.... held] of the same Henry 2 acres of land in Wilby by fealty, service and
rent of 1 penny a year and John Lost held of the same Henry 7 acres of land in Snyter[ton ...] and rent of 10
pence and 1 farthing a year and Thomas Hervy held of the same Henry 3 acres of land in the same [sic] by
fealty, service and rent [of ...]
which acre of land, rents and services Henry held of the lord Edward IV, late king, brother of the now lord
king [...]
200th part of 1 knight's fee and that Henry was seised of the acre of land, rents and services at the time of
his death.
The 1 acre of land is worth each year beyond reprises 4 pence.

And they say that John Bokenh'm had and received the issues and profits of the acre and rents and services
[from the time] of the death of the said Henry up to the time of the taking of this inquisition, by what right
or title the jurors do not know.

And furthermore they say that Nicholas Parker of Ho[n]yng in the county of Norfolk, esquire, John Jermy the younger, Thomas Jermy, brother of the same John, esquire, Thomas Banyard', gentleman, Thomas Toppesfeld', esquire, Thomas [Lam?]pette, esquire, and Master John Stanton', clerk, were seised of a certain manor and lands and tenements in Honyng, formerly of John Baxt[er], and also of those lands and tenements called Lombes, Wales and Drakes in the same vill, and of all the other lands and tenements which Nicholas purchased or in any other way ought to have in the vill of Honyng, Northwalsh[a]m, Worsted, Crosthwayte and Witton' in the aforesaid county, and being thus seised by a certain deed, shown to the jurors, granted to Henry Pakenh[a]m, son and heir of Robert Pakenh[a]m, esquire, deceased, an annual rent of 10 pounds, to have [and receive] to Henry and the heirs of his body lawfully begotten, annually at the feasts of Easter, the Nativity of St John the Baptist, St Michael and the Nativity of the lord by equal portions.

Henry was to have the right to distrain in the manor and tenements if the payment was in arrears by a month.

By virtue of which Henry was seised of the rent in his demesne as of fee, and Henry had issue Margaret, Elizabeth and Anne and died 6 February 20 Edward IV [1480/1], after whose death the rent descended to Margaret, Elizabeth and Anne as daughters and heirs of Henry. And they say that Margaret is of the age of 7 years and more, Elizabeth of 3 years and more and Anne is of the age of 2 years and more, and also that Margery, formerly the wife of the aforesaid Robert Pakenh'm received and had the said rent of 10 pounds from the time of the death of Henry to the time of the taking of this inquisition, by what right or title the jurors do not know.”
(source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kell/pakenham_family7.pdf)

I am curious if anyone can shed any light on the following:

1. What would be the reason for, and nature of, the 1472 de Banco entry among Nicholas Parker, his wife Margaret, Henry Pakenham and John Harecourt et al in Staffordshire? This is post Henry coming of age in 1468 and, of particular interest, why is Nicholas’ wife a party? Is she perhaps a sibling or other relative of Henry Pakenham rather than a Jermy as purported and, hence, why she was included (although there is no other evidence to support this)? Alternatively, did the Honing (and vicinity) Norfolk property encumbered in favour of Henry Pakenham include her dower lands and hence somehow her interest in Henry Pakenham’s Staffordshire property dispute?

2. What would be the reason for, and nature of, the 10l/annum rent that Nicholas et al (including his 2 purported Jermy brothers-in-law) owed Henry Pakenham as secured against lands in Honing (and vicinity) Norfolk which were not known Pakenham family lands as referenced in Henry Pakenham’s 1483 IPM?

3. Lastly, any other suggestions as to how to more conclusively establish the identity of Nicholas’ wife Margaret as a Jermy (or otherwise) and that she is John Parker’s mother would be most appreciated.

Cheers,

Pete
p***@peterdale.com
2013-02-11 21:36:46 UTC
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Just a brief follow-up to my inquiry below. Again, I would appreciate any assistance or guidance with my questions set forth at the end of my last post regarding how to better establish the identity of Nicholas Parker’s second wife Margaret as a Jermy (or otherwise).

I thought I would provide an example of a land transaction involving Nicholas Parker and the Jermy family. The following item involves the feoffees of John Jermy, Esq. (d. 1487), including Nicholas Parker, and John’s son John Jermy, knight (d. 1505).

Grant FC 91/L1/26 2nd October, 1489

Contents:
John Hevenyngham, knight, John Tymperley sen., knight, William Brewes, sen., knight, and Nicholas Parker at the requst of John Jermy, knight, to John Doget of Mendham, sen., Thomas Medylton, John Nyche sen. and John Fox; one messuage built upon called Whytes with land adjoining and appurtenances containing by estimation 12 acres in Mendham; and one pasture once built upon called Godys, in same place containing 11 acres; and one parcel of land called Payoks containing 2 acres in the same place; and one pasture called Greneley in Withersdale containing by estimation 18 acres
(source: National Archives - http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=173-fc91&cid=-1#-1)

I appreciate any/all assistance and thank you in advance for your review of this post.

Cheers,

Pete
p***@peterdale.com
2013-03-27 07:32:25 UTC
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Greetings,

I have received the commentary set forth below regarding my inquiry and welcome any further advice, comments or suggestions for further research. Thank you in advance for any assistance.

Cheers,

Pete

“1472 De banco entry re Parker & Pakenham in Staffordshire

You asked the reason for and the nature of the 1472 lawsuit, and why Margaret wife of Nicholas Parker was involved. This is, of course, not a real lawsuit, but a legal fiction designed to bar entail. So, this is the record in a court of law of the passing of an entailed estate from one party to another, from Nicholas Parker to John Harcourt.

It is much more difficult, even impossible, to get behind this particular record. We don't know how exactly how Nicholas Parker acquired the property in Staffordshire and we don't know exactly why his wife Margaret and Henry Pakenham were parties as well. However we can be sure that they had, at this time or in the past, some right or claim to the property. Since we know that Nicholas Parker was one of Henry's guardians, we might suspect that the property had come into Nicholas' hands in this way - perhaps he purchased/exchanged/purloined it from his ward - so that Henry had to be seen to renounce any legal right he might have, at that time or in the future. Perhaps the lands formed part of the Parker estate to which Margaret would be entitled as part of her dower, so that it was necessary for her to be seen to renounce any claim, present or future, which she might have.

I can see that your worry stems from the possibility that the property came to Nicholas Parker via his wife Margaret and not via his ward and I hope I have shown you that other explanations are possible.

1483 IPM of Henry Pakenham: £10 rent granted by Nicholas Parker to Henry Pakenham

You asked the reason for the £10 annual rent granted to Henry Pakenham by Nicholas Parker and the Jermys. Again, this is a very difficult, probably impossible, question to answer. There were all sorts of reasons for the granting of annual rents - they were viewed as just another commodity, to be bought, sold, bequeathed, granted &c. So, we find annual rents granted by testators, often for the lifetime of an individual (annuities), sometimes property would be sold on condition that the purchaser paid the vendor an annual rent from it, an annual rent could form part of a marriage settlement, and so on. I think we may only be able to say that the grant of rent to Henry Pakenham had something to do with his wardship - perhaps Nicholas and his feoffees granted the rent to Henry as part of some other property deal.”
p***@peterdale.com
2013-04-01 06:55:19 UTC
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Greetings,

Happy Easter. I have reviewed an interesting piece of possible corroborative evidence for the marriage of Nicholas Parker (c. 1420-1496) of Honing and Margaret Jermy (dau. of John Jermy, esq., d. 1487) of Metfield, Suffolk and Buckenham Ferry, Norfolk. It is a series of armorial depictions in stained glass windows found in Alston Court, Nayland, Suffolk. A number of members of the Parker and Jermy families are represented therein. With respect to the Jermy family it shows (I am reading into the depictions based on their respective description) John Jermy, esq. (d. 1487) impaling Elizabeth Wroth, his son Sir John Jermy (d. 1504) impaling Hopton and his grandfather Sir William Jermy (d. 1385) impaling Elizabeth Hemenhale. John Jermy, esq.’s mother is not similarly depicted, I am conjecturing, because she was an heiress along with her sister of her brother Sir William Mounteney’s estate and, thus, quartered with Jermy in its arms in later generations.

I note that there is a Parker of Honing impaling a Jermy which would appear to corroborate the relationship in question. However, I am uncertain why there is the inclusion of my purported ancestor Margaret (Jermy) Parker’s brother Sir John Jermy and his wife Hopton.

As always, any commentary, thoughts, advice or insight is most keenly appreciated.

Cheers,

Pete

Please see the information on Alston Court below:

********

The website, ‘http://www.thekingscandlesticks.com’, states the following with respect to Alston Court and the Jermy, Parker et. al. families:

“Alston Court Armorial Stained Glass

The references are to: Rev. E. Farrar, East-Anglian Daily Times 1912, 18th & 25th May and 1st June; Dr J. Blatchly, private communication with R. Knox.

North Window of Hall (left to right)

Jermy/Hopton (quarterly: Swillington/Wyssett/Pert/Hopton) [Farrar I]
Narburgh/Clere [Farrar III]
Parker (of Honing, Norf.)/Wichingham [Farrar III]
Boys (of Hoston - Honing?)/Wichingham [Farrar IV]
Payne/Spelman (of Narburgh, Norf.) [Farrar V]
Payne/ "X"? [Farrar VI]
Spelman/Narburgh [Farrar VII]
Parker (of Honing)/Jermy [Farrar VIII]
Payne/Rookwood [Farrar IX)

South Window of Hall (left to right).

Jermy/Hemenhall [Farrar X]
Wingfield/Parker [Farrar XI]
Haultoft (of Outwell, Norf.) [Farrar 2nd ser.I]
Hotoft/ "Y"? [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.II]

Willoughby (quarterly: Ufford/Haultoft/Haultoft/Beke) [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser III]
Hotoft [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.VI]
"Y"? [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser.V]
Willoughby/Hotoft [Blatchly; Farrar 2nd ser IV]

First Floor Landing (left to right)

Jermy/Wroth [of Enfield, Middx.] [Farrar XII]
Wingfield/Parker [Farrar XIII]

Oak Room

Upper Row (left to right):

Payne/Parker [Farrar XXIII]
Payne/Rookwood
Jermy/Wroth (of Enfield) [Farrar XV]
Pakenham/Parker [Farrar XX]
Jermy/Hopton (quarterly: Swillington/Wyssett/Pert/Hopton) [Farrar XIX]
Everard/Parker [Farrar XXII]

Lower Row (left to right):

Jenney/Boys (reversed) [Farrar XIV]
Appleyard/Parker [Farrar XVI]
Payne/Thwaites (reversed) [Farrar XVIII]
Parker/Jermy
Appleyard/Parker [Farrar XVII]

Pakenham/Parker [Farrar XXI]

Farrar suggested that "X" might be Thwaites but, although all colour has gone from Farrar VI in the North Window of the Hall, the 5 or 6 pointed star which can still be seen top right (sinister chief) indicates that the coat-of-arms is not the same as in Farrar XVIII in the Oak Room.

"Y" not yet identified, is "Azure a cross crosslet (botonny ?) argent, three lions' (or leopards'?) heads erased or tongued argent on a chief sable". The reputed Payne (Payn) arms - argent three boars' heads couped gules - are listed in Papworth as belonging to two Suffolk families, Cudlow and Playstead. According to Dr John Blatchly the Nayland Paynes, clothiers, were not armigerous; there was no mention of such a coat in early records.

If Alston Court stained glass is genuinely original to the house, it would seemingly relate to a Payne/Parker marriage around 1500. Andrew Paris/Parish, clothier, who owned Grooms (i.e. Alston Court) in 1606 married Jareth or Zareth (=Sarah) Wilson at Nayland in 1577 and is thought to have been born in about the 1550s, son of Thomas Paris of Nayland whose (second) wife was named Emma (his first wife is believed to have been Joane, who died in 1564). This Emma (1526/27-1588) who married Thomas Paris as a widow (her first husband being named Scarlet) might conceivably be a daughter of John Payne (1495?-1526), son of a Payne/Parker marriage, and his wife Agnes.

Andrew's father, Thomas Paris/Parish of Nayland, was the son of another Thomas of Nayland and his wife Margaret, whom he had married as a widow (of Robert Harvie); and this Thomas was the son of yet another Thomas, who married Eleanor Radcliffe of Nayland, and a first cousin of Emma Paris who married Robert Spring of Lavenham.

Alston Court Armorial Families

Jermy: Argent a lion rampant gules.
Hopton: Argent: on 2 bars sable 6 mullets of as many points, 3 and 3 or.
Narburgh: A chief ermine.
Clere: Argent, on a fess azure, 3 eagles displayed or. [Fees = broad horizontal band, displayed = wings extended]
Parker: Argent, a chevron between 3 mascles sable.
Wichingham: Ermine, on a chief sable 3 crosses pattee argent.
Boys: Argent, 2 bars gules on a bend sable an annulet or; a canton of the second. [Canton= a diminutive of the quarter]
Payn (?): Argent, 3 boars' heads couped gules.
Spelman: Sable, 11 plates between 2 flaunches argent.
Thwaites: Argent, on a fess sable between 2 fleurs-de-lys gules, as many bezants. [Bezant = round flat piece of gold]
Rookwood: Argent, 3 chess-rooks sable.
Hemenhall: Or, an a fess between 2 chevrons gules 3 escallops argent.
Wingfield: Argent, on a bend sinister gules, voided sable 3 pairs of wings in lure of the field. [Voided - with centre removed, pair of wings in lure = 2 wings joined together with their tips pointing downward]
Wroth: Argent, on a bend sable 3 lions' heads erased of the field, crowned or.
Jenney: Ermine, a bend gules, cotissed or.
Appleyard: Azure, a chevron or between 3 owls argent, a crescent for difference.
Pakenham: Gules, a garb argent. [Garb = sheaf]
Everard: Gules, on a fess between 3 estoiles argent, as many mullets sable.
Ufford: Sable, a cross engrailed or.
Haultoft: Sable, 3 lozenges ermine, a bordure engrailed of the second.
Beke: Gules, a cross moline argent.
Swillington: Argent, a chevron azure, a label of 3 ermine.
Wyssett: Gules, a griffin segreant argent. [Segreant = erect with wings extended]
Pert: Argent, on a bend gules, 3 mascles or.” (source: http://www.thekingscandlesticks.com/webs/pedigrees/85.html)
p***@gmail.com
2013-12-27 15:33:13 UTC
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Greetings,

A bleated Merry Christmas. Just a follow-up regarding the Parker-Jermy-Pakenham conundrum referenced above.

I note in a review of IPMs that a ‘John Germyn’ holds land tenure of certain property in Staffordshire in an assignment of dower to Alice Blounte, widow of John Blounte, esq., c. 1443 (source: ‘Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office’, Vol. XXVI, 21 to 25 Henry VI (1442-1447), edited by M. L. Holford, published by The Boydell Press, p. 153). Alice is assigned dower of certain lands in Fenton Culvert, Staffordshire “...except service and rent of 23s. 6d. issuing from various lands and tenements in the tenure of John Germyn”.

You will recall that John Jermy, esq. (d. 1487) of Metfield and Withersdale, Suffolk and Buckenham Ferry, Norfolk (among other places) is purported to be the father of Margaret Jermy wife of Nicholas Parker, esq. (d. 1496) of Honing, Norfolk. You will also recall that Nicholas Parker, esq. of Honing, Margaret his wife and Henry Pakenham were the subject of lawsuit in 1472 with respect to certain lands in Staffordshire (Weverston (Worston), Bescote (Bescot), Blumenhill (Blymhill), Whitgreve (Whitgreave), Eccleshale (Eccleshall), Little Bruggeford (Little Bridgeford), Colton, Charleton, and Mefford (Meaford) and the advowson of the church of Blumenhill (Blymhill)). The suit was brought by John Harecourt, esq., son and heir of Robert Harecourt, knight, and William Cumberford, William Offeley, John Olyver and Thomas Cook, of Stafford, and John Salter. John Harecourt is described as the lord of the fee (source: ‘Collections for a history of Staffordshire’, (1901), Vol. IV, New Series, edited by The William Salt Archaeological Society, printed by Harrison and Sons, London, pp. 179-180)

Lastly, I note in the IPM of John Jermy (d. 1487) that he holds the manor and advowson of Withersdale, Suffolk, of Elizabeth Harecort, widow. (source: ‘Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office’, (1898), Henry VII., Vol. I., published by Eyre and Spottiswoode, London, p. 140).

Note in the Staffordshire lawsuit and the Jermy IPM the reference to a member of the Harcourt family.

I am curious if there is any way to tie the 3 items above together and establish that John Jermy, esq. granted lands in Staffordshire to his daughter Margaret as a marriage portion (or part thereof) in connection with her marriage to Nicholas Parker (c. 1455-65)? Any advice or insight whatsoever with respect to the above would be sincerely appreciated. Many thanks in advance for your time in reviewing this post.

Cheers,

Pete
Peter G. M. Dale
2015-01-27 03:05:26 UTC
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Greetings,

Just a brief follow-up on my Parker of Honing, Norfolk family research. I recently identified that John Parker (d. 1527), son of Nicholas Parker (d. 1496) and Margaret Jermy (dau. of John Jermy, esq. (d. 1487) of Buckenham Ferry, Norfolk and bur. in Metfield, Suffolk), had a brother Thomas Parker who was a citizen and tailor in London. I set forth below the reference.

CP40no951 f 75
http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT1/H7/CP40no951/aCP40no951fronts/IMG_0075.htm

"London
Thomas Parker, citizen and tailor of London, brother of John Parker, and John Warner the younger, citizen and armourer of the same city, by their attorney offered themselves on the 4th day against John Parker of Honyng', co Norfolk, gentleman, concerning a plea that he should render to them 20 pounds which he owes them and unjustly detains. He did not come. And the sheriffs were ordered that [they should summon?] him. The sheriffs now report that he has nothing. Therefore he is to be taken that he should be here in the quindene of Easter."

Secondly, I have also found mention of an Augustine Parker in a deed involving both Nicholas Parker and his son John c. 1479. (source: NRO - BL/O/L/42, dated April 20, 1479 (I can provide a copy if anyone is interested)).

Where Nicholas Parker came from or who were his parents or siblings continues to elude me. Any insight or suggestions are most welcome.

Cheers,

Pete
Peter G. M. Dale
2015-01-27 03:15:50 UTC
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I forgot to add the reference to John Parker of Honing, Norfolk and his brother Thomas Parker citizen and tailor of London is c. 1500 (http://aalt.law.uh.edu/Indices/CP40Indices/CP40no951/CP40no951Pl.htm).

Anyone come across a Thomas Parker, citizen and tailor of London c. 1500 or an Augustine Parker c. 1479? (I know there are a number of Augustine Parkers in Ipswich 100+ years hence).
Post by p***@peterdale.com
Greetings,
Just a brief follow-up on my Parker of Honing, Norfolk family research. I recently identified that John Parker (d. 1527), son of Nicholas Parker (d. 1496) and Margaret Jermy (dau. of John Jermy, esq. (d. 1487) of Buckenham Ferry, Norfolk and bur. in Metfield, Suffolk), had a brother Thomas Parker who was a citizen and tailor in London. I set forth below the reference.
CP40no951 f 75
http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT1/H7/CP40no951/aCP40no951fronts/IMG_0075.htm
"London
Thomas Parker, citizen and tailor of London, brother of John Parker, and John Warner the younger, citizen and armourer of the same city, by their attorney offered themselves on the 4th day against John Parker of Honyng', co Norfolk, gentleman, concerning a plea that he should render to them 20 pounds which he owes them and unjustly detains. He did not come. And the sheriffs were ordered that [they should summon?] him. The sheriffs now report that he has nothing. Therefore he is to be taken that he should be here in the quindene of Easter."
Secondly, I have also found mention of an Augustine Parker in a deed involving both Nicholas Parker and his son John c. 1479. (source: NRO - BL/O/L/42, dated April 20, 1479 (I can provide a copy if anyone is interested)).
Where Nicholas Parker came from or who were his parents or siblings continues to elude me. Any insight or suggestions are most welcome.
Cheers,
Pete
Peter G. M. Dale
2020-07-14 02:58:04 UTC
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Greetings,

I’m curious if there is a way to identify whether an IPM exists for the following entry in the Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Volume XXI, p. 261, dated February 10, 1484:

"Writs of diem clausit extremum, after the death of the following persons, directed to the escheators in the counties named: - ... [Membrane 2. 739] ... Feb. 10, 1484 - Margaret late the wife of Nicholas Parker (late the wife of Robert Pakenham); Norfolk."
(https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=msu.31293400201293&view=1up&seq=277)

Any assistance would be much appreciated.

Cheers,

Pete
pdale (at) peterdale (dot) com

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