Discussion:
Anthony a Wood's sketch of Rev. John White of Chirton, Wilts.
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r***@yahoo.com
2019-06-17 20:15:26 UTC
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John White of Monkton Deverell and Chirton, Wilts., was a connection of the Cogswell family through Phyllis White, wife of Rev. William Thomson, mother of Mrs. Elizabeth Cogswell.

aWood's _Athenae Oxonienses_ contains a moderately lengthy statement about him:

JOHN WHITE was a Wiltsh. man born, became a Servitor of S. Albans Hall in Mich. terme an. 1600; whence, after he had continued for some time, went to Mert. Coll. and there was entertain'd in the condition of a Servitour to Mr. (afterwards Sir) Isaac Wake, but whether he made a longer stay in Merton Coll. or in S. Alb. Hall I know not; we will not contend for, and therefore let the Albanians take, him. After he had left the University without a degree confer'd on him, he took holy orders, and had a Cure bestowed on him in his own Country at Monkton-Deverel, and at length became Vicar of Cherton near to the Devises: From which place being ejected in the time of the Rebellion he practiced Physick at Conock. Afterwards being restored in 1660, he set hiself to the writing of poetry in his old age; the effects of which are contained in three volumes full of fooleries and impertinencies, entit.
_Miscellanea Variegata, Anagrammata, Epigrammata, Distica &c._ The first vol. contains Anagrams, Epigrams, &c. on the Kings and Nobility of England -- Printed at Lond. 1663 in a large thin oct, in the 79 year of the authors age. The 2d Vol is on the Bishops and Clergie -- Lond. 1664 in thin oct, in the 80 years of the authors age. The third is on the Gentry and other persons---Lond. 1665, in a thin oct. in the 81. year of the authors age. In all which books are also several copies of English verses. He yeilded to nature at Cherton beforementioned on the 6 of Dec. in sixteen hundred seventy and one, and was buried in the Chancel of the Church there on the north side of Communion Table, near the wall. Soon after was this inscription set up on the said wall. _John White Vicar of Cherton was buried neare this place the 8th day of December An. Dom. 1671._


https://books.google.com/books?id=CxlPAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA1291&dq=monkton+%22john+white%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwig7a7XofHiAhVBJt8KHdv6ChY4FBDoAQhXMAk#v=onepage&q=monkton%20%22john%20white%22&f=false
Matt A
2019-06-17 21:07:06 UTC
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Not sure about the other two volumes, as they are given as descriptions rather than titles, but the first volume appears to be available through the microfilm set and digital subscription database Early English Books Online (EEBO), based on the catalogue entry below. It shouldn't be too hard to track down and scan for genealogical clues.

https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1182874

-Matt A
r***@yahoo.com
2019-06-17 21:32:33 UTC
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Post by Matt A
Not sure about the other two volumes, as they are given as descriptions rather than titles, but the first volume appears to be available through the microfilm set and digital subscription database Early English Books Online (EEBO), based on the catalogue entry below. It shouldn't be too hard to track down and scan for genealogical clues.
https://library.villanova.edu/Find/Record/1182874
-Matt A
Would they be in Latin, since the poems of "English verses" were specially noted?

It looks like he may have had a daughter Mary, aged 28 in 1637, per this Salisbury marriage license:

TUTT, Edward, M.A., Vicar of Knoyle Odierne, Wilts, clarke, and Mary WHITE, of Monkton Deverill, sp., 28, d. of John White, of the same, clarke. 3 Feb.

https://archive.org/details/genealogist3019selb/page/n133
r***@yahoo.com
2019-07-09 18:53:42 UTC
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I wonder if the conclusions on the White/ Thomson/ Cogswell relationship published in the 2008 _NEHGR_ can be disputed. I suppose they can, actually. Or, at least, questioned.

Remember that the Rev. William Thomson of Westbury had married (1) Phyllis ____, (d. 1608); and (2) Elizabeth ___, mother of his two younger children, sons William Thomson and Samuel Thomson, who was later a grad. of Oxford, a medical doctor and indeed Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, etc.

The 2008 article shows that Phyllis Cogswell, a granddaughter of the first wife (Phyllis), via Elizabeth (Thomson) Cogswell, married in the 1620s at Chirton to one John Broadhurst. The 1671 will of Rev. John White mentions some Broadhurst boys, who he calls his "Trinepotes." Would step-grandsons of his sister be trinepotes? The article assumes a blood relationship between Rev. White and the first wife, Phyllis.

Dr. Samuel Thomson, in a 1660 letter to the Cogswells in New England, also mentions "my uncle White."

https://books.google.com/books?id=q1oMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA79&dq=cogswell+%22a+continual+damage%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiT65OPuajjAhUSbs0KHf5YCiIQ6AEINDAC#v=onepage&q=cogswell%20%22a%20continual%20damage%22&f=false

What if the blood relationship was through the second wife, Elizabeth, and Phyllis's offspring were the "steps," rather than vice versa?

The LDS IGI shows a marriage at Stepney, Middlesex, 29 Aug. 1610, between William Thomson and Elizabeth White. (We would need to check this to see if it is compatible with a minister's marriage.)

As I've indicated before, there is good reason to think that Dr. Samuel Thomson, M.D., spent time in the 1640s at Rochester, Kent, somewhat close to London (and Stepney):

https://lists.rootsweb.com/hyperkitty/list/gen-medieval.rootsweb.com/thread/183393/

(The same posting gives arguments for Dr. Samuel Thomson's wife being a Mary Knapp by birth.)

So, it seems we have evidence that descendants of both wives considered Rev. John White an uncle of some sort.

I would finally like to point out an alternate reading of the Samuel Thomson letter. The version published in _Proc. of the Mass. Hist. Soc._ renders one sentence as follows: "Their [his children's] good mother is with me, so hath been these six years, a continual damage and a great sorrow."

The reading of the same sentence published in _Putnam's Monthly Historical Magazine_ v. 4 (1896): 260 is a bit different: "The children's grandmother is with me, has been near six years a continual ---- and a great scourge."

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044098875891&view=1up&seq=298

If "grandmother," not "good mother," is the correct reading, this may mean that Samuel's OWN mother, Elizabeth (? White) Thomson was still alive in March 1660, and then perhaps quite elderly, hence a damage, sorrow, or scourge. Or it could mean that his mother-in-law was alive and living with the family in 1660.
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