Discussion:
de Bohun, le Bon, and Bone
(too old to reply)
s***@yahoo.com
2018-12-26 20:33:59 UTC
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I am not sure where this will show up in the thread. I am checking to see how Robert Bone Thompsone Bonares deBohun is showing up in my lineage with the Thompsons. Can anyone help me with why the name would be like that? I understand families may have changed their name as they arrived in the US but why not Bone instead. Just curious if anyone could help. This Thompson lineage gown down thru the Forrests.
taf
2018-12-26 22:59:41 UTC
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Post by s***@yahoo.com
I am not sure where this will show up in the thread. I am checking to see
how Robert Bone Thompsone Bonares deBohun is showing up in my lineage with
the Thompsons. Can anyone help me with why the name would be like that?
With a name like this it is usually one of two things. Either someone with an antiquarian mindset rechristened themselves with an elaborate and anachronistic set of names, or else a modern genealogist let their enthusiasm get the better of them and entered it into their records by combining all of the different hypothetical ancestral names. Either way, this is almost certainly not the name the person was born with, and the best way forward is to see what you can find independent of the material giving him this naming.

taf
Andrew Lancaster
2018-12-29 12:26:11 UTC
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This is a set of old surnames I am interested in because of my wife's Flemish Boons (who I know have cousins in the US). When I first started looking at such surnames I came across all the typical theories, connecting all Boons to Bohuns. I have since seen a 16th century parish register which translated the surname into Latin for a bean, which is what boon means in Dutch. But I also remain open to the idea that the surname in this part of Europe comes from Bononia (Boulogne-sur-Mer, older Dutch Bonen) because I have seen in older records that Boon and Bonen, Boonen etc were often interchangeable. I doubt that these surnames come from Romance Bon or any old Frankish personal names, at least in this part of Europe.

I guess the bigger point to make is that any name which is a single easy-to-pronounce syllable is going to literally have one or more possible explanations in every language. The neutral hypothesis is thus that names with the basic form of Bo-n have NUMEROUS origins even if we restrict ourselves to the geographically small area around the English channel and north sea.
Justin Bone
2021-05-26 14:36:45 UTC
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Post by Andrew Lancaster
This is a set of old surnames I am interested in because of my wife's Flemish Boons (who I know have cousins in the US). When I first started looking at such surnames I came across all the typical theories, connecting all Boons to Bohuns. I have since seen a 16th century parish register which translated the surname into Latin for a bean, which is what boon means in Dutch. But I also remain open to the idea that the surname in this part of Europe comes from Bononia (Boulogne-sur-Mer, older Dutch Bonen) because I have seen in older records that Boon and Bonen, Boonen etc were often interchangeable. I doubt that these surnames come from Romance Bon or any old Frankish personal names, at least in this part of Europe.
I guess the bigger point to make is that any name which is a single easy-to-pronounce syllable is going to literally have one or more possible explanations in every language. The neutral hypothesis is thus that names with the basic form of Bo-n have NUMEROUS origins even if we restrict ourselves to the geographically small area around the English channel and north sea.
I can't believe this thread was started in 97. Wow. Any more progress?
lancast...@gmail.com
2021-05-27 11:19:51 UTC
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Post by Justin Bone
Post by Andrew Lancaster
This is a set of old surnames I am interested in because of my wife's Flemish Boons (who I know have cousins in the US). When I first started looking at such surnames I came across all the typical theories, connecting all Boons to Bohuns. I have since seen a 16th century parish register which translated the surname into Latin for a bean, which is what boon means in Dutch. But I also remain open to the idea that the surname in this part of Europe comes from Bononia (Boulogne-sur-Mer, older Dutch Bonen) because I have seen in older records that Boon and Bonen, Boonen etc were often interchangeable. I doubt that these surnames come from Romance Bon or any old Frankish personal names, at least in this part of Europe.
I guess the bigger point to make is that any name which is a single easy-to-pronounce syllable is going to literally have one or more possible explanations in every language. The neutral hypothesis is thus that names with the basic form of Bo-n have NUMEROUS origins even if we restrict ourselves to the geographically small area around the English channel and north sea.
I can't believe this thread was started in 97. Wow. Any more progress?
Concerning the surnames Boon and Bonen in Flanders, unless someone finds better information, I am thinking of the origin as uncertain.
pj.ev...@gmail.com
2021-05-27 14:32:07 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Justin Bone
Post by Andrew Lancaster
This is a set of old surnames I am interested in because of my wife's Flemish Boons (who I know have cousins in the US). When I first started looking at such surnames I came across all the typical theories, connecting all Boons to Bohuns. I have since seen a 16th century parish register which translated the surname into Latin for a bean, which is what boon means in Dutch. But I also remain open to the idea that the surname in this part of Europe comes from Bononia (Boulogne-sur-Mer, older Dutch Bonen) because I have seen in older records that Boon and Bonen, Boonen etc were often interchangeable. I doubt that these surnames come from Romance Bon or any old Frankish personal names, at least in this part of Europe.
I guess the bigger point to make is that any name which is a single easy-to-pronounce syllable is going to literally have one or more possible explanations in every language. The neutral hypothesis is thus that names with the basic form of Bo-n have NUMEROUS origins even if we restrict ourselves to the geographically small area around the English channel and north sea.
I can't believe this thread was started in 97. Wow. Any more progress?
Concerning the surnames Boon and Bonen in Flanders, unless someone finds better information, I am thinking of the origin as uncertain.
There are, in the US, Boon[e]s who first were Bondes, from Sweden. So it's definitely a multiple-origin name.
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