Discussion:
Geoffrey Chaucer in the Common Pleas
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c***@gmail.com
2019-06-21 22:11:05 UTC
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Dear Newsgroup ~

It's been said "time and tide wait for no man." Those are the words of Geoffrey Chaucer, the English poet and author, who died in 1400. Widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages, he is best known as the author of The Canterbury Tales. He has been styled the "Father of English literature" and was the first writer buried in Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Recently I unexpectedly encountered a Common Pleas lawsuit involving Geoffrey Chaucer. A brief abstract is provided below.

In Easter term 1400 Robert Shirwynd, Esq., and Isabel his wife, administratrix of the goods and chattels of Walter Bukholt, Esq., who died intestate, sued Geoffrey Chaucer, Esq., in the Court of Common Pleas regarding a debt of £11 11s. 11d.

Court of Common Pleas, CP40/557, image 78f (available at http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT2/H4/CP40no557/aCP40no557fronts/IMG_0078.htm).

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
Vance Mead
2019-06-22 06:07:22 UTC
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Thanks, Douglas. That's an interesting discovery.
s***@gmail.com
2019-08-21 11:06:11 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Dear Newsgroup ~
It's been said "time and tide wait for no man." Those are the words of Geoffrey Chaucer, the English poet and author, who died in 1400. Widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages, he is best known as the author of The Canterbury Tales. He has been styled the "Father of English literature" and was the first writer buried in Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey.
Recently I unexpectedly encountered a Common Pleas lawsuit involving Geoffrey Chaucer. A brief abstract is provided below.
In Easter term 1400 Robert Shirwynd, Esq., and Isabel his wife, administratrix of the goods and chattels of Walter Bukholt, Esq., who died intestate, sued Geoffrey Chaucer, Esq., in the Court of Common Pleas regarding a debt of £11 11s. 11d.
Court of Common Pleas, CP40/557, image 78f (available at http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT2/H4/CP40no557/aCP40no557fronts/IMG_0078.htm).
Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah
Dear Mr Richardson,

Vance Mead has drawn my attention to your discovery of this very interesting life record. This entry clearly relates to an earlier dispute between Buckholt's estate and Chaucer, dating from 1398. Chaucer scholars have always assumed that this matter, which was related to the purchase of timber during Chaucer's time as Clerk of the King's Works, had been settled, but your find shows that this was not the case. This record is also one of the last references to Chaucer during his lifetime.

I would like to write up a note or short article about this entry. I will of course credit the discovery to you and note Vance Mead's assistance in directing me toward it.

With best wishes,

Sebastian (Sobecki)

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