Discussion:
Where to Publish Articles on Medieval Subjects?
Add Reply
Wibs
2019-07-26 12:21:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hi guys,

I have just finished a 30 page article on ‘The Serjeants of Chancery’, covering the period 1191-1377, which discusses the early history of the serjeanty, and the serjeants (the Spigurnel, the Chaufecire and the Portejoye), including tables of the officers, and their biographies, and was wondering where would be the best place to publish this.

I have done three passes of proofing, but the paper has not yet been proofed externally, and I have no idea on where to go to get it peer-reviewed.

When I look at the English Historical Review and Speculum websites, I am put off by the large amount of re-writing I would have to do, as they both have different ‘house styles’ for articles, conflicting rules on the use of Bold type, referencing standards, their own templates, etc.

I have thought about submitting it to the Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, or even self-publishing via Amazon.

Any suggestions, recommendations, tips, welcome.

Thanks

Wibs
taf
2019-07-26 14:50:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Hi guys,
I have just finished a 30 page article on ‘The Serjeants of Chancery’, covering the period 1191-1377, which discusses the early history of the serjeanty, and the serjeants (the Spigurnel, the Chaufecire and the Portejoye), including tables of the officers, and their biographies, and was wondering where would be the best place to publish this.
I have done three passes of proofing, but the paper has not yet been proofed externally, and I have no idea on where to go to get it peer-reviewed.
When I look at the English Historical Review and Speculum websites, I am put off by the large amount of re-writing I would have to do, as they both have different ‘house styles’ for articles, conflicting rules on the use of Bold type, referencing standards, their own templates, etc.
I have thought about submitting it to the Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, or even self-publishing via Amazon.
Unfortunately, this is the cost of doing business. All periodicals have their 'house styles'. You have to ask yourself what you want to accomplish. If you want wide distribution, it is worth the time it takes to do the rewrites (this coming from someone who has been sitting on a handful of articles for almost a decade for want of enthusiasm over rewriting for house styles, one of which I specifically rewrote to match Foundations' house style and then decided it might not be the right venue). If you want to be able to claim to have published it, then self-publication is the easiest way to do that and no rewriting would be required. (I am not being dismissive here - someone I used to work with had a lifelong ambition of authoring something in the Library of Congress - I didn't have the heart to tell her that all she had to do was send them a copy.) If you just want it to be available to people, make yourself an Academia account and upload it.

taf
Vance Mead
2019-07-26 15:54:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'd say submit it and see what they say. If they are interested in the content they will ask for a rewrite and explain what they want.
Vance Mead
2019-07-26 16:31:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'd say submit it and see what they say. If they are interested in the content they will ask for a rewrite and explain what they want.

As for peer review, let the editor handle that.
Wibs
2019-07-28 18:31:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Hi guys,
I have just finished a 30 page article on ‘The Serjeants of Chancery’, covering the period 1191-1377, which discusses the early history of the serjeanty, and the serjeants (the Spigurnel, the Chaufecire and the Portejoye), including tables of the officers, and their biographies, and was wondering where would be the best place to publish this.
I have done three passes of proofing, but the paper has not yet been proofed externally, and I have no idea on where to go to get it peer-reviewed.
When I look at the English Historical Review and Speculum websites, I am put off by the large amount of re-writing I would have to do, as they both have different ‘house styles’ for articles, conflicting rules on the use of Bold type, referencing standards, their own templates, etc.
I have thought about submitting it to the Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, or even self-publishing via Amazon.
Any suggestions, recommendations, tips, welcome.
Thanks
Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be Premium members to find anything in the text of the work, and Premium is not cheap. I would only get feedback if I was a Premium member too.

I eventually went for Amazon self-publishing as it appeared to allow text with no house styles imposed. This proved to be a little misleading, as they automatically converted all my footnotes into endnotes (and I much prefer footnotes), so no solution is perfect, but Amazon came the closest.

The article is available digitally via a Kindle version almost immediately, and a booklet print version a couple of days later.

Search www.amazon.co.uk for 'The Serjeants of Chancery'. They provide a first page preview.

All in all, I was pleased with the outcome.

Wibs
taf
2019-07-28 22:16:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the
article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be
Premium members to find anything in the text of the work,
Well, that or they need to know to do a Google search using the 'site:academia.edu' parameter along with the words they seek.

taf
Hans Vogels
2019-07-29 04:49:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the
article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be
Premium members to find anything in the text of the work,
Well, that or they need to know to do a Google search using the 'site:academia.edu' parameter along with the words they seek.
taf
Like the name of the author.

Hans Vogels
taf
2019-07-29 07:19:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hans Vogels
Post by taf
Post by Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the
article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be
Premium members to find anything in the text of the work,
Well, that or they need to know to do a Google search using the 'site:academia.edu' parameter along with the words they seek.
Like the name of the author.
Not just author. You can search by author on the academia site non-subscriber search engine so it is not necessary to use the Google workaround. As Wibs pointed out, you cannot search for something within the text that way, but by doing a site-limited Google search you can actually search for a specific name (or other search term) within the text of articles. For example, I searched for:

"Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com

to see if anyone had mentioned this person within the text of their submissions, and found several interesting articles I had not previously seen (as well as many more that were entirely uninteresting).

taf
Wibs
2019-07-29 10:52:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Hans Vogels
Post by taf
Post by Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the
article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be
Premium members to find anything in the text of the work,
Well, that or they need to know to do a Google search using the 'site:academia.edu' parameter along with the words they seek.
Like the name of the author.
"Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com
to see if anyone had mentioned this person within the text of their submissions, and found several interesting articles I had not previously seen (as well as many more that were entirely uninteresting).
taf
Thanks taf, very useful to know. There is also a workaround to search the text of books in the Internet Archive, which I'm sure you are aware of.

Incidentally, Amazon have now published the paperback version of the article, and in this format they retained all the footnotes.
Peter Stewart
2019-07-30 04:22:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Hans Vogels
Post by taf
Post by Wibs
Thanks for the advice. I looked into academia but people can only find the
article if they know the title, or one of a few keywords. They must be
Premium members to find anything in the text of the work,
Well, that or they need to know to do a Google search using the 'site:academia.edu' parameter along with the words they seek.
Like the name of the author.
"Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com
to see if anyone had mentioned this person within the text of their submissions, and found several interesting articles I had not previously seen (as well as many more that were entirely uninteresting).
Interestingly, when I copied your search terms into Google this is the
entire response:

"Your search - "Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com - did not match
any documents.

Suggestions:

Make sure that all words are spelled correctly.
Try different keywords.
Try more general keywords.
Try fewer keywords."

Peter Stewart
taf
2019-07-30 13:28:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
"Your search - "Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com - did not match
any documents.
Yeah, that's because it should have been academia.edu
Peter Stewart
2019-07-30 23:17:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
"Your search - "Diego Gomez de Toledo" site:academia.com - did not match
any documents.
Yeah, that's because it should have been academia.edu
How do they get away with an .edu extension when the website is just
another common-or-garden commercial hustle?

After every time I go there my email is bombarded with artificially
unintelligent messages claiming that "A paper on economic archaeology
mentions the name Peter Stewart" or similar useless nonsense, and
inviting me to pay for the privilege of seeing through this falsehood.

Peter Stewart
taf
2019-07-31 02:51:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
How do they get away with an .edu extension when the website is just
another common-or-garden commercial hustle?
Don't know how this happened - I repeatedly mistakenly call them .com because of the cognitive disconnect.
Post by Peter Stewart
After every time I go there my email is bombarded with artificially
unintelligent messages claiming that "A paper on economic archaeology
mentions the name Peter Stewart" or similar useless nonsense, and
inviting me to pay for the privilege of seeing through this falsehood.
Yeah. Same here, but it stopped once I used the 'unsubscribe' links at the bottom of the messages (though I haven't logged in since, so I can't say it won't restart the next time I want to download a pdf and have to log in). It is clearly trying to be a Linkedin-type social media platform disguised as an academic resource. Well, if they are going to pretend to be something different than they are, so will I - I signed up with a fake name and a single-purpose throwaway email address.

taf
Peter Stewart
2019-07-31 08:31:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
How do they get away with an .edu extension when the website is just
another common-or-garden commercial hustle?
Don't know how this happened - I repeatedly mistakenly call them .com because of the cognitive disconnect.
Post by Peter Stewart
After every time I go there my email is bombarded with artificially
unintelligent messages claiming that "A paper on economic archaeology
mentions the name Peter Stewart" or similar useless nonsense, and
inviting me to pay for the privilege of seeing through this falsehood.
Yeah. Same here, but it stopped once I used the 'unsubscribe' links at the bottom of the messages (though I haven't logged in since, so I can't say it won't restart the next time I want to download a pdf and have to log in). It is clearly trying to be a Linkedin-type social media platform disguised as an academic resource. Well, if they are going to pretend to be something different than they are, so will I - I signed up with a fake name and a single-purpose throwaway email address.
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.

They are trading on the professional vanity of ambitious academics who
find it useful to count citations to their work.

In my case a namesake in the faculty of Classics at Oxford may explain a
few of the useless notices, but by no means all. I don't get these for
papers mentioning at least two other namesakes in different fields who
are present on the website, so apparently their algorithms simply don't
distinguish between medieval and ancient history - that's some kind of
compromising stupidity for an allegedly academic resource.

Peter Stewart
taf
2019-07-31 13:15:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.
Oh, it was, but then the generic name I picked would be expected to appear in papers. Less expected, it matched the topic of the papers I had logged in to download with the fake name and told me that the incredibly Anglo name I picked had been named in X number of papers about medieval Iberia. In other words, completely made up BS.

taf
Peter Stewart
2019-07-31 23:16:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.
Oh, it was, but then the generic name I picked would be expected to appear in papers. Less expected, it matched the topic of the papers I had logged in to download with the fake name and told me that the incredibly Anglo name I picked had been named in X number of papers about medieval Iberia. In other words, completely made up BS.
Not surprising - the one positive aspect of this crude con is that it
may keep some academic idiots harmlessly occupied searching for mentions
of their name in papers and languages that are incomprehensible to them.

Peter Stewart
Peter Stewart
2019-08-01 04:27:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.
Oh, it was, but then the generic name I picked would be expected to
appear in papers.  Less expected, it matched the topic of the papers I
had logged in to download with the fake name and told me that the
incredibly Anglo name I picked had been named in X number of papers
about medieval Iberia.  In other words, completely made up BS.
Not surprising - the one positive aspect of this crude con is that it
may keep some academic idiots harmlessly occupied searching for mentions
of their name in papers and languages that are incomprehensible to them.
True to form, today my email account was regaled with this BS from
academia.edu:

'"Peter Stewart”: 80 new mentions' (in the subject line); and

'The name “Peter Stewart” was mentioned in 80 papers recently discovered
by Academia' (in the message).

Evidently they suppose from their dealings with the academic world that
anyone in it may just be foolish enough to pay them for making such
"discoveries" and for checking out a lot of fictitious "new mentions". I
wonder why.

Peter Stewart
Peter Howarth
2019-08-01 05:52:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.
Oh, it was, but then the generic name I picked would be expected to
appear in papers.  Less expected, it matched the topic of the papers I
had logged in to download with the fake name and told me that the
incredibly Anglo name I picked had been named in X number of papers
about medieval Iberia.  In other words, completely made up BS.
Not surprising - the one positive aspect of this crude con is that it
may keep some academic idiots harmlessly occupied searching for mentions
of their name in papers and languages that are incomprehensible to them.
True to form, today my email account was regaled with this BS from
'"Peter Stewart”: 80 new mentions' (in the subject line); and
'The name “Peter Stewart” was mentioned in 80 papers recently discovered
by Academia' (in the message).
Evidently they suppose from their dealings with the academic world that
anyone in it may just be foolish enough to pay them for making such
"discoveries" and for checking out a lot of fictitious "new mentions". I
wonder why.
Peter Stewart
I don't pay anything to academia.edu and I have cancelled all emails purporting to tell me of mentions of my name (there is an oft-cited physician with the same name). But in amongst all the usual dross, I have found a few interesting and even useful articles which I have downloaded. As a result, I get the occasional email notifying me of the arrival of similar articles, and I have not found those emails sufficiently annoying yet for me to cancel them as well.

Peter Howarth
Peter Stewart
2019-08-01 09:37:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Howarth
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
It will be most interesting to hear if your fake name is supposed to be
mentioned in countless papers that have nothing to do with your profile.
Oh, it was, but then the generic name I picked would be expected to
appear in papers.  Less expected, it matched the topic of the papers I
had logged in to download with the fake name and told me that the
incredibly Anglo name I picked had been named in X number of papers
about medieval Iberia.  In other words, completely made up BS.
Not surprising - the one positive aspect of this crude con is that it
may keep some academic idiots harmlessly occupied searching for mentions
of their name in papers and languages that are incomprehensible to them.
True to form, today my email account was regaled with this BS from
'"Peter Stewart”: 80 new mentions' (in the subject line); and
'The name “Peter Stewart” was mentioned in 80 papers recently discovered
by Academia' (in the message).
Evidently they suppose from their dealings with the academic world that
anyone in it may just be foolish enough to pay them for making such
"discoveries" and for checking out a lot of fictitious "new mentions". I
wonder why.
Peter Stewart
I don't pay anything to academia.edu and I have cancelled all emails purporting to tell me of mentions of my name (there is an oft-cited physician with the same name). But in amongst all the usual dross, I have found a few interesting and even useful articles which I have downloaded. As a result, I get the occasional email notifying me of the arrival of similar articles, and I have not found those emails sufficiently annoying yet for me to cancel them as well.
Thanks Peter - I hadn't looked for a way to cancel the unwanted emails.
Now that I have done so, and used it, I found incidentally that the "new
mentions" of my name have supposedly increased from 80 to 94 in just a
few hours.

Con artists often seem to indulge in crudity for its own sake, like
Donald Trump. Perhaps they feel with him that anyone going along with
patent lies will be bound with another iron hoop each time they sully
their own integrity in this way.

Peter Stewart
Richard Smith
2019-08-05 19:04:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
How do they get away with an .edu extension when the website is just
another common-or-garden commercial hustle?
Don't know how this happened
When the domain name system was first created, the only organisations
with domain names were large academic institutions, companies and
government departments, and they were largely trusted to register
domains sensibly. To register a .edu domain, you simply had to say that
you intended to use it for an "education related" purpose. It wasn't
until 2001 that this formally changed to restrict it to higher
educational institutions in the United States, and this became enforced.
The academia.edu domain was registered in 1999 under the old rules,
quite possibly legitimately given the nebulous requirement. The
operators of the .edu domain registry have never been permitted to do a
full purge of all now-non-compliant domain registrations, though over
the years most have lapsed, one way or another Roughly ten years ago,
the registration academia.edu was transferred (presumably sold) to the
current commercial operation. It's an odd sequence of events that
couldn't happen now, but was entirely proper at the time.

Richard
Peter Stewart
2019-08-05 22:50:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Smith
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
How do they get away with an .edu extension when the website is just
another common-or-garden commercial hustle?
Don't know how this happened
When the domain name system was first created, the only organisations
with domain names were large academic institutions, companies and
government departments, and they were largely trusted to register
domains sensibly.  To register a .edu domain, you simply had to say that
you intended to use it for an "education related" purpose.  It wasn't
until 2001 that this formally changed to restrict it to higher
educational institutions in the United States, and this became enforced.
 The academia.edu domain was registered in 1999 under the old rules,
quite possibly legitimately given the nebulous requirement.  The
operators of the .edu domain registry have never been permitted to do a
full purge of all now-non-compliant domain registrations, though over
the years most have lapsed, one way or another  Roughly ten years ago,
the registration academia.edu was transferred (presumably sold) to the
current commercial operation.  It's an odd sequence of events that
couldn't happen now, but was entirely proper at the time.
Thanks for the explanation - given all the vast resources of the
academic world, I don't quite understand why a not-for-profit
alternative website hasn't been established, where scholars can
disseminate their work without annoying each other.

Perhaps the vital resource lacking for this is brain-power.

Peter Stewart
taf
2019-08-06 01:48:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
Thanks for the explanation - given all the vast resources of the
academic world, I don't quite understand why a not-for-profit
alternative website hasn't been established, where scholars can
disseminate their work without annoying each other.
Perhaps the vital resource lacking for this is brain-power.
There are such repositories for scientific fields - physics, chemistry, biology. It just took a groups of academics deciding to set it up and putting together the funding to keep it running. That and getting enough people to put their stuff there to get it on people's radar. It is still hit and miss - many physics papers get deposited, fewer biology, except for specific fields (genomic archaeology papers almost all get deposited before they are published). It wouldn't surprise me if there is such a repository for the social sciences, but it just hasn't achieved the necessary profile to become 'a thing'.

taf
Peter Stewart
2019-08-06 02:53:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Peter Stewart
Thanks for the explanation - given all the vast resources of the
academic world, I don't quite understand why a not-for-profit
alternative website hasn't been established, where scholars can
disseminate their work without annoying each other.
Perhaps the vital resource lacking for this is brain-power.
There are such repositories for scientific fields - physics, chemistry, biology. It just took a groups of academics deciding to set it up and putting together the funding to keep it running. That and getting enough people to put their stuff there to get it on people's radar. It is still hit and miss - many physics papers get deposited, fewer biology, except for specific fields (genomic archaeology papers almost all get deposited before they are published). It wouldn't surprise me if there is such a repository for the social sciences, but it just hasn't achieved the necessary profile to become 'a thing'.
I suspect that in medieval studies at least, the major publishers may
exercise an inhibiting influence over a lot of academics who would
otherwise share their work freely.

The cost of purchasing articles or separate chapters from books has
become absurd, when it should be obvious that institutional libraries
are the main market for whole books or journal issues at inflated
expense and that most people wanting only parts of these are not likely
to reduce sales by much.

Peter Stewart
Andrew Lancaster
2019-08-07 21:30:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by taf
There are such repositories for scientific fields - physics, chemistry, biology. It just took a groups of academics deciding to set it up and putting together the funding to keep it running. That and getting enough people to put their stuff there to get it on people's radar. It is still hit and miss - many physics papers get deposited, fewer biology, except for specific fields (genomic archaeology papers almost all get deposited before they are published). It wouldn't surprise me if there is such a repository for the social sciences, but it just hasn't achieved the necessary profile to become 'a thing'.
Yes there are online preprint publications for various social sciences, including history. I think we have to admit though that people most able to contribute to medieval studies, at least on the continent where many of them are, are going to be the last people to try something like that. I think this field will be at least one whole generation later than other social sciences to take up such opportunities. People on this forum are of course a small minority.
Peter Cockerill
2019-07-28 19:44:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Hi guys,
I have just finished a 30 page article on ‘The Serjeants of Chancery’, covering the period 1191-1377, which discusses the early history of the serjeanty, and the serjeants (the Spigurnel, the Chaufecire and the Portejoye), including tables of the officers, and their biographies, and was wondering where would be the best place to publish this.
I have done three passes of proofing, but the paper has not yet been proofed externally, and I have no idea on where to go to get it peer-reviewed.
When I look at the English Historical Review and Speculum websites, I am put off by the large amount of re-writing I would have to do, as they both have different ‘house styles’ for articles, conflicting rules on the use of Bold type, referencing standards, their own templates, etc.
I have thought about submitting it to the Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, or even self-publishing via Amazon.
Any suggestions, recommendations, tips, welcome.
Thanks
Wibs
The cover page is a great read Wibs excellent research
Peter
Andrew Lancaster
2019-08-07 21:34:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Hi guys,
I have just finished a 30 page article on ‘The Serjeants of Chancery’, covering the period 1191-1377, which discusses the early history of the serjeanty, and the serjeants (the Spigurnel, the Chaufecire and the Portejoye), including tables of the officers, and their biographies, and was wondering where would be the best place to publish this.
I have done three passes of proofing, but the paper has not yet been proofed externally, and I have no idea on where to go to get it peer-reviewed.
When I look at the English Historical Review and Speculum websites, I am put off by the large amount of re-writing I would have to do, as they both have different ‘house styles’ for articles, conflicting rules on the use of Bold type, referencing standards, their own templates, etc.
I have thought about submitting it to the Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, or even self-publishing via Amazon.
Any suggestions, recommendations, tips, welcome.
Thanks
Wibs
Honestly are those formatting problems really so worrying to you?
Wibs
2019-08-08 12:38:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes, when there hundreds of references that need to be redone in their house format, and all headings changed because some don't like bold,and some prefer endnotes to footnotes, then go through the entire exercise twice more, because you are submitting to three journals to see who wants to publish it, it really is a headache I can do without, so I went for the solution that takes my work 'as is'. I don't know why some journals want references in the form SURNAME, forenames, title in single quotes, city of publication and year in brackets, page number; while the next wants forename, surname of author, title in italics; then the next wants Title, author forenames surname, year, etc etc, does it really matter? And that is just for the references. Then some dictate the size of font, line spacing, restrictions on the use of bold or underlining. I am currently working on The Chancery under Richard II and Henry IV, currently at 500 pages plus, with more to come, with well over a thousand references. Can you imagine the rewrite to get all that converted to any particular house style? I will self-publish, if I put it out at all.
Ian Goddard
2019-08-20 15:35:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wibs
Yes, when there hundreds of references that need to be redone in their house format, and all headings changed because some don't like bold,and some prefer endnotes to footnotes, then go through the entire exercise twice more, because you are submitting to three journals to see who wants to publish it, it really is a headache I can do without, so I went for the solution that takes my work 'as is'. I don't know why some journals want references in the form SURNAME, forenames, title in single quotes, city of publication and year in brackets, page number; while the next wants forename, surname of author, title in italics; then the next wants Title, author forenames surname, year, etc etc, does it really matter? And that is just for the references. Then some dictate the size of font, line spacing, restrictions on the use of bold or underlining. I am currently working on The Chancery under Richard II and Henry IV, currently at 500 pages plus, with more to come, with well over a thousand references. Can you imagine the rewrite to get all that converted to any particular house style? I will self-publish, if I put it out at all.
One solution - best undertaken at the start - is to define named styles
in your word-processor for each element of a reference. You can then
edit the style for a given element to be bold, italic or bold
upside-down struck-through italic to the journal editor's whim and then
redefine it to the next editor's choice.

Oh to be organised to that extent. I wish I was...

Ian

Loading...