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OT: report of Bela III Y chromosome
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taf
2020-07-16 04:45:58 UTC
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Since this is likely to get mentioned here soon enough anyhow I will just toss it out to get it over with.

A group of Hungarian researchers have reported the Y chromosome sequence of Bela III of Hungary (I cannot vouch for the skeleton identification). He and another unidentified skeleton originally from the royal basilica are reported to have had a Y in the R group with a previously unknown SNP, which they name R-ARP (for Arpad). Contrary to legends of Hun origin, it appears to trace to the 4000-year-old Iranian-speaking populations of the '-stans' (specifically Pashtun, Tajik, Uzbek, and Turkmen), but by way of Bashkortostan, between the Urals and the Volga (or at least R-ARP is closest to one found among the Bashkirs, with a hypothetical split in the first centuries AD). A companion study of medieval graves from the Magyar homeland revealed continuity of a different haplotype, from the N group common among populations speaking the Finno-Ugric language family to which Hungarian belongs, and also found among the Bashkirs. The authors suggest this hints at the Arpads arising out of a mixed Finno-Ugric/proto-Iranian population, to which I would add an alternative, that they represented a non-native proto-Iranian elite ruling over the Finno-Ugric Magyars.

(As an aside, they also found a 'descendant' haplotype in Serbia - R-ARP with niine additional SNPs, in a man thus likely descended in the male line from the Arpads of Bela's period, give or take a 100 years or so.)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41431-020-0683-z

taf
Peter Stewart
2020-07-16 06:57:55 UTC
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Post by taf
Since this is likely to get mentioned here soon enough anyhow I will just toss it out to get it over with.
A group of Hungarian researchers have reported the Y chromosome sequence of Bela III of Hungary (I cannot vouch for the skeleton identification). He and another unidentified skeleton originally from the royal basilica are reported to have had a Y in the R group with a previously unknown SNP, which they name R-ARP (for Arpad). Contrary to legends of Hun origin, it appears to trace to the 4000-year-old Iranian-speaking populations of the '-stans' (specifically Pashtun, Tajik, Uzbek, and Turkmen), but by way of Bashkortostan, between the Urals and the Volga (or at least R-ARP is closest to one found among the Bashkirs, with a hypothetical split in the first centuries AD). A companion study of medieval graves from the Magyar homeland revealed continuity of a different haplotype, from the N group common among populations speaking the Finno-Ugric language family to which Hungarian belongs, and also found among the Bashkirs. The authors suggest this hints at the Arpads arising out of a mixed Finno-Ugric/proto-Iranian population, to which I would add an alternative, that they represented a non-native proto-Iranian elite ruling over the Finno-Ugric Magyars.
(As an aside, they also found a 'descendant' haplotype in Serbia - R-ARP with niine additional SNPs, in a man thus likely descended in the male line from the Arpads of Bela's period, give or take a 100 years or so.)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41431-020-0683-z
A 2018 paper on Bela III's DNA profiling by four of the same researchers
and some others can be read here:
https://www.academia.edu/36044524

and on the identification of the remains as his (rather than of Kálmán
Könyves who died in 1116 and his first wife, daughter of Roger Bosso of
Sicily), here:
https://www.academia.edu/31964

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