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MATILDA OF BOULOGNE ahnenlist
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Eric Kniffin
2020-06-10 21:12:27 UTC
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In Queens of the Conquest, Alison Weir writes:

"In 1125, Count Eustace of Boulogne retired from the world to become a Cluniac monk, probably at Rumilly Priory near Boulogne, and ceded the county of Boulogne and all his rich estates in England to his daughter Matilda, making her one of the most desirable heiresses in Europe—not only on account of her great inheritance, but also because, like Matilda of Flanders and Adeliza of Louvain, she was impeccably descended from Charlemagne, and was also the great-granddaughter of King Cnut, the great-niece of Edward the Confessor, and the niece of the beloved Matilda of Scotland."

What's this about King Cnut??
Peter Stewart
2020-06-10 23:53:54 UTC
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Post by Eric Kniffin
"In 1125, Count Eustace of Boulogne retired from the world to become a Cluniac monk, probably at Rumilly Priory near Boulogne, and ceded the county of Boulogne and all his rich estates in England to his daughter Matilda, making her one of the most desirable heiresses in Europe—not only on account of her great inheritance, but also because, like Matilda of Flanders and Adeliza of Louvain, she was impeccably descended from Charlemagne, and was also the great-granddaughter of King Cnut, the great-niece of Edward the Confessor, and the niece of the beloved Matilda of Scotland."
What's this about King Cnut??
A warning not to rely on Alison Weir, ever.

She had perhaps misread a chart showing that Matilda's paternal
grandfather Eustace II of Boulogne had married Cnut's step-daughter
Godgifu. But of course this did not make Godgifu into Matilda's paternal
grandmother (who was St Ida of Lorraine), much less Cnut into her
great-grandfather.

Or perhaps she was just making it up as she went along, perhaps
chattering into a dictaphone since she is only marginally literate.

Peter Stewart
Eric Kniffin
2020-06-11 00:20:54 UTC
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Yeah, I was pretty sure Cnut was wrong. Didn't know Weir was quite *that* bad. Lol
Peter Stewart
2020-06-11 00:31:47 UTC
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Post by Eric Kniffin
Yeah, I was pretty sure Cnut was wrong. Didn't know Weir was quite *that* bad. Lol
Well, she's not as bad for medieval genealogy as Roderick Stuart - but
that isn't saying much.

She glommed on to a nice little earner with her first book and has never
needed to look back in self-criticism since, because some publishers and
too many book-buyers are more avid for the simplistic and sensational
than for facts.

Maybe it's going a bit too far to say she is only marginally literate,
as possibly she writes and revises her books in her sleep.

Peter Stewart

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