Discussion:
Douglas Richardson's New PLANTAGENET ANCESTRY
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Douglas Hickling
2004-05-27 21:30:08 UTC
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Although I have had my copy of Douglas Richardson's PLANTAGENET
ANCESTRY, etc. for almost a week, I am still just beginning to
discover its wonders. Yet, I am amazed at what he has accomplished!
Through the years, newsgroup members have griped over the delays in
its publication date, but the finished product should make us all glad
that Mr. Richardson took the time to do the job right, thus cementing
his status as the most respected American genealogist of the 21st
century.

The depth of Mr. Richardson's scholarship, reflected in the detailed
listings of his sources, is astonishing. With Richardson, nothing is
left to speculation, because he backs up what he says. PLANTAGENET
ANCESTRY thus comes as a welcome antidote to those false or unproved
pedigrees that one constantly finds on WorldConnect and FamilySearch.

Not only is Mr. Richardson's book the best of its kind, it represents
an absolute bargain compared to RD600, the other indispensable work
covering royal descents. A previous posting has commented that PA's
large format makes it easier to read than RD600, but, if truth be
told, the typeface used in PA is no larger. Further, the printed area
on each PA page, and therefore the genealogical content, is more than
double that of RD600.

Mr. Richardson says in his introduction to PA that this is merely the
first work to appear in the new Royal Ancestry Series, and that
succeeding volumes will present descents from the Magna Carta Sureties
of 1215, early feudal English barons, and Emperor Charlemagne. As
much as we would all like to see these later volumes quickly, let us
hope that he will take his time to make sure that they live up to the
high standard reflected in his PLANTAGENET ANCESTRY!

Douglas Hickling
***@comcast.net
Nathaniel Taylor
2004-05-28 02:30:57 UTC
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... The depth of Mr. Richardson's scholarship, reflected in the detailed
listings of his sources, is astonishing. With Richardson, nothing is
left to speculation, because he backs up what he says...
This, er, testimonial touches on a subject on which there may not be
universal agreement. Dennys - Stradling - Beaufort comes to mind: in
Douglas' posted draft segment a thicket of cited (but non-probative)
sources seemed to lend a false sense of authority to what may more
rightly be considered a possible but unproved ancestry.

Nevertheless, the book is clearly the product of much hard work and
sounds like it should be very enjoyable for interested American
descendants for whom it may be the last or only book they consult on
their medieval ancestry, as well as useful for those who seek to dig
further into these and related lines.

Nat Taylor

http://home.earthlink.net/~nathanieltaylor/
Peter Stewart
2004-05-28 03:44:09 UTC
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Post by Nathaniel Taylor
... The depth of Mr. Richardson's scholarship, reflected in the detailed
listings of his sources, is astonishing. With Richardson, nothing is
left to speculation, because he backs up what he says...
This, er, testimonial touches on a subject on which there may not be
universal agreement. Dennys - Stradling - Beaufort comes to mind: in
Douglas' posted draft segment a thicket of cited (but non-probative)
sources seemed to lend a false sense of authority to what may more
rightly be considered a possible but unproved ancestry.
Nevertheless, the book is clearly the product of much hard work and
sounds like it should be very enjoyable for interested American
descendants for whom it may be the last or only book they consult on
their medieval ancestry, as well as useful for those who seek to dig
further into these and related lines.
Well said, Nat - if only the pitchers of PA3 would settle for that, then
Dougals Richardson's undoubted efforts and discoveries would be seen in
hype-free perspective, as a worthwhile contribution to genealogy.

Peter Stewart
MWelch8442
2004-05-28 05:00:59 UTC
Permalink
Well Nat you have no issue quoting Doug on your web site.
Nathaniel Taylor
2004-05-28 06:47:17 UTC
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Post by MWelch8442
Well Nat you have no issue quoting Doug on your web site.
Quote? I cite Doug's NEHGR article on the Raynsford line. The Dennys -
Stradling - Beaufort line should be treated to a similar published
investigation, not just languish in the book, where by inference it may
be mistakenly assumed to be proved.

Nat Taylor

http://home.earthlink.net/~nathanieltaylor/
John Brandon
2004-05-28 12:59:22 UTC
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Post by Nathaniel Taylor
not just languish in the book, where by inference it may
be mistakenly assumed to be proved.
... in much the same way the Dudley line has languished through
several editions of PA.
Nathaniel Taylor
2004-05-28 14:37:22 UTC
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Post by John Brandon
Post by Nathaniel Taylor
not just languish in the book, where by inference it may
be mistakenly assumed to be proved.
... in much the same way the Dudley line has languished through
several editions of PA.
True! Marshall, please write this up! To be sure, Marshall would be the
last person to claim his Dudley hypothesis as proved, tho' it has now
appeared in a number of compilations (AAP, RD, PA). But his review of
the earlier theories, and elements of the 'Capt. Sir Henry Dudley'
hypothesis, are elegant and should be in print.

Nat Taylor

http://home.earthlink.net/~nathanieltaylor/
John Brandon
2004-05-28 17:35:51 UTC
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I also wonder about the Aubrey and Bevan lines that have appeared in
the PAs. For many generations, they're just names without dates. It
doesn't exactly inspire confidence.
L Mahler
2004-06-02 20:26:46 UTC
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Post by John Brandon
I also wonder about the Aubrey and Bevan lines that have appeared in
the PAs. For many generations, they're just names without dates. It
doesn't exactly inspire confidence.
A lot of those Welsh lines are based on Glenn's Merion in the Welsh
Tract.
Even if they lack actual evidence, some people wont accept them as
being disproved until an article shows all the flaws.

There was a royal descent published for Rachel Perne, wife of Edward
Rawson of Newbury, Mass.
It was published in the Mary & John Clearing House vol. 26 - I havent
seen it myself, but it looks like the compilations on royal descents
missed that one.

Leslie
Doug McDonald
2004-06-02 21:12:15 UTC
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OK, I've found a real howler. On page 211, Frances Latham is listed
as widow of Thomas Dungan, of Lincoln's Inn, London.

She is actually the widow of **William** Dungan, Perfumer, of
London. Thomas Dungan, of Lincoln's Inn, is a descendant of
Edward I and was the purported father of William Dungan, but this
has been disproven.

Doug McDonald

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