Discussion:
Item lego cuilibet filiolorum ... what does this really mean in a will?
(too old to reply)
Jan Wolfe
2020-08-02 01:18:44 UTC
Permalink
I am wondering about the meaning in the religious bequests section of wills written in the late 1490s of statements such as "Item lego cuilibet filiolo meo et filiabz meis iiijd" and "Item lego cuilibet filiolorum et filiola__ me__ xxd." The first example is from the 1496 will of Agnes Roberts (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00011?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891188 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D981440) and the second is from the 1498 will of Richard Tuttesham (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00555?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891046 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D982050).
By the way, TNA is allowing free download of PCC wills.

The rest of Richard Tuttesham's will suggests that he did not have any surviving children or grandchildren. The known son of Agnes Roberts was Walter Roberts, but he was not a little or young son in 1496.
taf
2020-08-02 03:12:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jan Wolfe
I am wondering about the meaning in the religious bequests section of wills written in the late 1490s of statements such as "Item lego cuilibet filiolo meo et filiabz meis iiijd" and "Item lego cuilibet filiolorum et filiola__ me__ xxd." The first example is from the 1496 will of Agnes Roberts (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00011?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891188 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D981440) and the second is from the 1498 will of Richard Tuttesham (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00555?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891046 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D982050).
By the way, TNA is allowing free download of PCC wills.
The rest of Richard Tuttesham's will suggests that he did not have any surviving children or grandchildren. The known son of Agnes Roberts was Walter Roberts, but he was not a little or young son in 1496.
My guess would be, godsons/goddaughters.

taf
Peter Stewart
2020-08-02 10:17:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by taf
Post by Jan Wolfe
I am wondering about the meaning in the religious bequests section of wills written in the late 1490s of statements such as "Item lego cuilibet filiolo meo et filiabz meis iiijd" and "Item lego cuilibet filiolorum et filiola__ me__ xxd." The first example is from the 1496 will of Agnes Roberts (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00011?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891188 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D981440) and the second is from the 1498 will of Richard Tuttesham (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00555?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891046 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D982050).
By the way, TNA is allowing free download of PCC wills.
The rest of Richard Tuttesham's will suggests that he did not have any surviving children or grandchildren. The known son of Agnes Roberts was Walter Roberts, but he was not a little or young son in 1496.
My guess would be, godsons/goddaughters.
The words filiolus and filiola in classical Latin meant little son and
daughter respectively, but in medieval usage normally meant godson and
goddaughter, the derivation respectively of the modern French
filleul/filleule. The first bequest was of 4d each to a godson and
several goddaughters of Agnes, the second of 20d to each of the godsons
and goddaughters (presumably filiolarum) of Richard.

Peter Stewart
Jan Wolfe
2020-08-03 05:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by taf
Post by Jan Wolfe
I am wondering about the meaning in the religious bequests section of wills written in the late 1490s of statements such as "Item lego cuilibet filiolo meo et filiabz meis iiijd" and "Item lego cuilibet filiolorum et filiola__ me__ xxd." The first example is from the 1496 will of Agnes Roberts (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00011?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891188 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D981440) and the second is from the 1498 will of Richard Tuttesham (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/5111/images/40611_311110-00555?ssrc=&backlabel=Return&pId=891046 or https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D982050).
By the way, TNA is allowing free download of PCC wills.
The rest of Richard Tuttesham's will suggests that he did not have any surviving children or grandchildren. The known son of Agnes Roberts was Walter Roberts, but he was not a little or young son in 1496.
My guess would be, godsons/goddaughters.
The words filiolus and filiola in classical Latin meant little son and
daughter respectively, but in medieval usage normally meant godson and
goddaughter, the derivation respectively of the modern French
filleul/filleule. The first bequest was of 4d each to a godson and
several goddaughters of Agnes, the second of 20d to each of the godsons
and goddaughters (presumably filiolarum) of Richard.
Peter Stewart
Thank you Todd and Peter.

Loading...