Discussion:
Who Was William de Weyland?
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Peter D. A. Warwick
2021-07-10 14:28:18 UTC
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I've come across claims that William de Weyland, husband of Elizabeth de Bathonia, was the son of Thomas, the judge. Is this true? If so what is the evidence? If not then who was his father (and mother) and what is the evidence for that? I've tried to sort this out on my own, but, so far, have had no luck.
Peter Stewart
2021-07-11 04:14:09 UTC
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Post by Peter D. A. Warwick
I've come across claims that William de Weyland, husband of Elizabeth de Bathonia, was the son of Thomas, the judge. Is this true? If so what is the evidence? If not then who was his father (and mother) and what is the evidence for that? I've tried to sort this out on my own, but, so far, have had no luck.
You have probably read the article on Thomas de Weyland by Paul Brand in
ODNB - if not, the only source cited and probably your best bet for any
further genealogical details or leads is a chapter in his own book:
'Chief justice and felon: the career of Thomas Weyland', in *The Making
of the Common Law (1992), pp. 113-133.

In ODNB Brand stated: "Weyland, Sir Thomas (c. 1230–1298), justice, was
the third son of Herbert Weyland and his wife, Beatrice, one of six
daughters and coheirs of Stephen of Witnesham, a minor landholder at
Witnesham near Ipswich in Suffolk. His eldest brother, John, was a clerk
of the common bench from c.1244 until his death in 1259. A second older
brother, William, pursued an administrative and judicial career in both
Ireland and England from 1248 onwards ... Thomas Weyland's family was
fortunate. An abjuration normally meant not only the forfeiture of the
abjuror's chattels but also the escheat of all of his lands. Edward I
was merciful to Weyland's second wife, Margaret, whom he had married by
1276 and whose maiden name was probably Filliol ... Weyland had retained
sole title to at least three of his manors and these did escheat.
However, he had taken considerable care to make provision for each of
his children and for his widow when he died. His lands were to be
divided between the three children of his first marriage (John, William,
and Alina) and three of the children of his second (Richard, Elena, and
Margaret); the fourth (Thomas) entered the church, and his widow was to
retain a life interest in part of the lands."

If this son by the first marriage is the same William you are looking
for, rather than a cousin of his, it is an advance on his biography in
Sophia Bates-Harbin's *Members of Parliament for the County of Somerset*
(1939) p. 15: "William de Weilonde (Weylond, Weyland), came of a Norfolk
family; he may have been a son of Sir William Weyland of Oxboro,
Norfolk, escheator for that county, who was probably the father or
brother of Thomas de Weyland, chief justice under Edward I. Sir William
the younger appears to have acquired his interest in Somerset through
his wife, Elizabeth, d. and h. of Osbert de Bathonia. He held half a fee
each in Loxton and Rodwell, and land in Hassockmore, in 1303, and in
1316, Compton Durville with Nicholas Wedergrave. He was commissioner of
array, 1324; to determine indictments for unlawful assemblies, etc.,
1326; of Oyer and Terminer, 1327, but he died before April of this
year." The references she gave were to the article on Thomas de Weyland
by Thomas Tout in DNB and the following: "C.R. 1307, 12; Aids, iv, 307,
312, 331; P.R. 18 E. II, (1), 33; 19 E. II, (2), 5d; 20 E,. II, 27d;
F.R. 1 E. III, 17; C.I.P.M. vi, 36."

Peter Stewart
Peter Howarth
2021-07-11 10:33:44 UTC
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Post by Peter D. A. Warwick
I've come across claims that William de Weyland, husband of Elizabeth de Bathonia, was the son of Thomas, the judge. Is this true? If so what is the evidence? If not then who was his father (and mother) and what is the evidence for that? I've tried to sort this out on my own, but, so far, have had no luck.
For what it is worth, the heraldry of Thomas de Weyland of Blaxhall (d.1298) and of William de Weyland of Charsfield (d.1327) suggest that they are not related. Thomas of Blaxhall bore 'azure, a lion rampant argent, over all a bend gules',[1] as did his son John (d.1312).[2] Whereas Nicholas de Weyland of Charsfield (d.1313) bore 'argent, on a cross gules five escallops or'.[3] He held Charsfield of the Bigod earls of Norfolk, and Ralph II le Bigod of Stockton bore 'argent, on a cross gules five escallops argent'.[4] I suspect, but have no proof, that Nicholas had a son William (d.1327), of Charsfield, Brandeston, Westerfield, Suffolk; Oxborough, Norfolk; Radwell, Loxton, Compton Durville, Hassockmoor, Som, who bore, at the same time as Nicholas, 'argent, on a cross gules five escallops or, a label azure'.[5]

Heraldry at this period is not infallible but it can suggest lines of enquiry.

Peter Howarth

[1] Charles’s Roll (c.1285) FII 15
[2] Stirling Roll (1304) ST 55, First Dunstable Roll (1309) L 119, Parliamentary Roll (c.1312) N 506
[3] Parliamentary Roll (c.1312) N 480; and see Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 186-187
[4] Parliamentary Roll (c.1312) N 537
[5] Parliamentary Roll (c.1312) N 481; and see Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 187
Peter D. A. Warwick
2021-07-11 14:53:50 UTC
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I confess it has been a few years since I last looked at this and it has been the recent posts on the de Weylands that has brought this back to mind. I’ve looked at Jim Webber’s post on the Weyland family posted October 26, 2013 to this list. I’ve also looked at a biography of Thomas de Weyland from Wikisource, which came from Volume 60, DNB 1885-1900, plus the Close Rolls and Patent Rolls.
William was the husband of Elizabeth de Bathonia, daughter of Osbert de Bathonia. He was connected with both Norfolk and Suffolk. William’s daughter, Joan, was widow of John de Ingoldesthorpe. She married Gilbert Peche/Peeche afterwards.
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