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Background of Walter Morton, Constable of Kidwelly Castle?
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g***@earthlink.net
2014-07-26 17:00:53 UTC
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I'm looking into Walter Morton, who served Henry IV and Henry V in Wales during the rebellion of Owen Glendower. I find sufficient references to him as his activities there, but can't find out his ancestry, nor where his son settled after they lost Llandough Castle to the Cricklades. I'm interested in whether he might be from a collateral line of the lords of Morton manor in Somerset, and whether his son could be the Walter Morton who made a major land deal throughout Somerset in the 1440s. I seem to be at a dead end with both these questions. Any ideas?
t***@googlemail.com
2015-12-28 13:44:00 UTC
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Hi Geraint, I'm researching the Mortons from the other end. In the 1400s only the wealthy or English had surnames in Wales. There were a family of Mortons in the parish of St Ishmael and in the hundred of Kidwelly who were yeoman barley farmers among the top five families in the parish. Over time they reverted to Welsh patronymics with just two cousins retaining the surname consistently, against local custom. The last Morton in the parish was the child of an ill advised cousin marriage, last heard of in 1768 when his illegitimate twins died. The fall of the house of Morton... It seems likely therefore that Walter had a son or sons who kept the last name despite their fathers inquisition, and had some limited lands of a few acres. Perhaps a maternal uncle provided for them. There are male Morton descendants living in the UK.
j***@gmail.com
2019-09-22 15:39:41 UTC
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Post by g***@earthlink.net
I'm looking into Walter Morton, who served Henry IV and Henry V in Wales during the rebellion of Owen Glendower. I find sufficient references to him as his activities there, but can't find out his ancestry, nor where his son settled after they lost Llandough Castle to the Cricklades. I'm interested in whether he might be from a collateral line of the lords of Morton manor in Somerset, and whether his son could be the Walter Morton who made a major land deal throughout Somerset in the 1440s. I seem to be at a dead end with both these questions. Any ideas?
I appreciate that your post is dated several years ago but I have just taken a rubbing of the brass commemorating Wenllian Walsh, wife of Walter Morton. She died on 25th December 1427 and is commemorated by the earliest surviving figure brass in Wales which is to be found in the parish church of St.Dochdwy, Llandough, near Cowbridge. The memorial comprises a female effigy and inscription in brass ( a shield is lost) and a canopy incised in the limestone slab.

As you may know, the Walsh family came from (or held the manor of) Langridge in Somerset and there is a brass in the parish church there to Robert Walsh, the brother of Wenllian who died in the same year as his sister. The brass now comprises just an inscription, the effigy within a cross having been lost centuries ago. There was also a brass to Robert's widow (who died in 1441) which was of a similar style to that in Llandough church. Unfortunately, the effigy of that was stolen in about 2002 - I'm not certain if it has been recovered - so all that remains is the inscription.

I'd be interested to learn more about Walter Morton, Wenllian's husband, who was not only Constable of Cardiff Castle but also of Kidwelly. What information do you have on his administrative and military career?

Jonathan

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