Discussion:
Correct form when using surnames only in a sentence?
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Wibs
2021-03-18 09:25:00 UTC
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I may introduce the name William Wansworth in a sentence, and in the following sentence it would be normal to write "by 1305 Wandsworth went on to...", leaving out the forename.

However, if I introduce the name Michael de la Pole in a sentence, what should I write in the following sentence, "in 1380 de la Pole went on to become..." or in 1380 Pole went on to become..."?

Wibs
joseph cook
2021-03-18 11:20:34 UTC
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I may introduce the name William Wansworth in a sentence, and in the following sentence it would be normal to write "by 1305 Wandsworth went on to...", leaving out the forename.
However, if I introduce the name Michael de la Pole in a sentence, what should I write in the following sentence, "in 1380 de la Pole went on to become..." or in 1380 Pole went on to become..."?
In Standard American English, there is no rule here and either form "de la Pole" or "Pole" could be considered correct. Although a general preference to include "de la Pole" as the full surname is usually preferred in the same way "de Gaulle" is always "de Gaulle", not "Gaulle".

--Joe C
Peter Stewart
2021-03-18 22:17:09 UTC
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Post by Wibs
I may introduce the name William Wansworth in a sentence, and in the following sentence it would be normal to write "by 1305 Wandsworth went on to...", leaving out the forename.
However, if I introduce the name Michael de la Pole in a sentence, what should I write in the following sentence, "in 1380 de la Pole went on to become..." or in 1380 Pole went on to become..."?
In his 1984 book on the impeachment of Michael de la Pole, John Roskill
referred to him by surname only as "De la Pole", see here
https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&lr=&id=dtVRAQAAIAAJ.

The usual practice with stand-alone surnames in feminine form is to omit
just the "de", as for instance with the marquis de La Fayette who is
almost universally called "Lafayette" in English. However, "Lapole" or
"La Pole" would be strange and either of your alternatives would seem
better to me.

Peter Stewart

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