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Quatermaine/Quatremayne of Oxfordshire
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Jan Wolfe
2019-09-02 19:51:00 UTC
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Have any of you studied the Quatermaine family or connected the early modern family of Hierome Quatermaine to members of the medieval Quatermaine family?

I have traced one of my family lines to Hierome Quatermaine who married Marian Childe in Chalgrove, Oxfordshire, in 1574 and had three children baptized there: William, Prudence, and Raffe, in 1577, 1582, and 1586. Marian/Marie Quatermaine was buried in 1588 in Chalgrove.

A Hierome Quatermaine married Mary Marshall in Blewbury, Berkshire, later that year. A pedigree of her family is in _The Genealogist_ here, https://books.google.com/books?id=fRfly9tiaacC&pg=PA127, and also here, https://archive.org/details/miscellaneamares02mars/page/n25 (the year of the marriage is incorrectly stated as 1558 rather than 1588 in both).

There are medieval records of a Quatermaine/Quatermayne family in Oxfordshire, for example, _The Visitation of the County of Oxford_ mentions a Quatermayne tomb, https://books.google.com/books?id=f6wKAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA22 or https://archive.org/details/visitationsofcou57harv/page/n41. The Quatremayne arms were Gu. a fess Az. between four dexter hands couped at the wrist Or (p. 2 of the Oxford visitation).
Jan Wolfe
2019-09-04 20:30:05 UTC
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Lee's history of Thame church provides a pedigree of the Quartermain or Weston and Rycott, https://books.google.com/books?id=f1oMAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA291. This is the family I mentioned in the previous post. The last male descendant shown in the pedigree is Richard Quatremayns/Quartermaine (c1392-1477) who was an M.P. for Oxfordshire in 1432 1433, and 1472-75. HOP (1439-1509) mentions that he "was the oldest commoner to sit in Parliament in the 15th century."

There was another Richard Quatremayns who was born about 1473 and living in 1425. This Richard is not mentioned in the above pedigree. He was a witness to the assignment of dower to Joan, widow of Thomas Quatremayns, in 1400. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/inquis-post-mortem/vol18/pp167-187, and he testified at the proof of age of Thomas Baldyngton in 1425 in Wilcote, Oxfordshire, http://www.inquisitionspostmortem.ac.uk/view/inquisition/22-528/.
Post by Jan Wolfe
Have any of you studied the Quatermaine family or connected the early modern family of Hierome Quatermaine to members of the medieval Quatermaine family?
I have traced one of my family lines to Hierome Quatermaine who married Marian Childe in Chalgrove, Oxfordshire, in 1574 and had three children baptized there: William, Prudence, and Raffe, in 1577, 1582, and 1586. Marian/Marie Quatermaine was buried in 1588 in Chalgrove.
A Hierome Quatermaine married Mary Marshall in Blewbury, Berkshire, later that year. A pedigree of her family is in _The Genealogist_ here, https://books.google.com/books?id=fRfly9tiaacC&pg=PA127, and also here, https://archive.org/details/miscellaneamares02mars/page/n25 (the year of the marriage is incorrectly stated as 1558 rather than 1588 in both).
There are medieval records of a Quatermaine/Quatermayne family in Oxfordshire, for example, _The Visitation of the County of Oxford_ mentions a Quatermayne tomb, https://books.google.com/books?id=f6wKAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA22 or https://archive.org/details/visitationsofcou57harv/page/n41. The Quatremayne arms were Gu. a fess Az. between four dexter hands couped at the wrist Or (p. 2 of the Oxford visitation).
John Higgins
2019-09-04 23:39:22 UTC
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Post by Jan Wolfe
Lee's history of Thame church provides a pedigree of the Quartermain or Weston and Rycott, https://books.google.com/books?id=f1oMAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA291. This is the family I mentioned in the previous post. The last male descendant shown in the pedigree is Richard Quatremayns/Quartermaine (c1392-1477) who was an M.P. for Oxfordshire in 1432 1433, and 1472-75. HOP (1439-1509) mentions that he "was the oldest commoner to sit in Parliament in the 15th century."
There was another Richard Quatremayns who was born about 1473 and living in 1425. This Richard is not mentioned in the above pedigree. He was a witness to the assignment of dower to Joan, widow of Thomas Quatremayns, in 1400. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/inquis-post-mortem/vol18/pp167-187, and he testified at the proof of age of Thomas Baldyngton in 1425 in Wilcote, Oxfordshire, http://www.inquisitionspostmortem.ac.uk/view/inquisition/22-528/.
Post by Jan Wolfe
Have any of you studied the Quatermaine family or connected the early modern family of Hierome Quatermaine to members of the medieval Quatermaine family?
I have traced one of my family lines to Hierome Quatermaine who married Marian Childe in Chalgrove, Oxfordshire, in 1574 and had three children baptized there: William, Prudence, and Raffe, in 1577, 1582, and 1586. Marian/Marie Quatermaine was buried in 1588 in Chalgrove.
A Hierome Quatermaine married Mary Marshall in Blewbury, Berkshire, later that year. A pedigree of her family is in _The Genealogist_ here, https://books.google.com/books?id=fRfly9tiaacC&pg=PA127, and also here, https://archive.org/details/miscellaneamares02mars/page/n25 (the year of the marriage is incorrectly stated as 1558 rather than 1588 in both).
There are medieval records of a Quatermaine/Quatermayne family in Oxfordshire, for example, _The Visitation of the County of Oxford_ mentions a Quatermayne tomb, https://books.google.com/books?id=f6wKAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA22 or https://archive.org/details/visitationsofcou57harv/page/n41. The Quatremayne arms were Gu. a fess Az. between four dexter hands couped at the wrist Or (p. 2 of the Oxford visitation).
The second Richard Quatremayns mentioned above (whose birth year is presumably 1373 rather than 1473) could be the Richard Quartermain who appears in the first page of the Quartermain pedigree in Lee's history of the church of Thame. He would have been the brother-in-law of Joan, widow of Thomas Quatremayns, whose assignment of dower in 1400 is cited above.

The families of Quatremayns and Baldington were closely connected with the Danvers family. F. N. Macnamara's "Memorials of the Danvers Family" (avilable online via the FHL) has some discussion of the Quartemains family. He relies largely on Lee's work, with some different interpretations, and may not address your particular question - but it might be worthe a look.
Jan Wolfe
2019-09-05 01:22:25 UTC
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On Wednesday, September 4, 2019 at 7:39:24 PM UTC-4, John Higgins wrote:
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Post by John Higgins
The second Richard Quatremayns mentioned above (whose birth year is presumably 1373 rather than 1473) could be the Richard Quartermain who appears in the first page of the Quartermain pedigree in Lee's history of the church of Thame. He would have been the brother-in-law of Joan, widow of Thomas Quatremayns, whose assignment of dower in 1400 is cited above.
The families of Quatremayns and Baldington were closely connected with the Danvers family. F. N. Macnamara's "Memorials of the Danvers Family" (avilable online via the FHL) has some discussion of the Quartemains family. He relies largely on Lee's work, with some different interpretations, and may not address your particular question - but it might be worthe a look.
Ah, the perennial century typo! Yes, this Richard Quatremayns was born about 1373, not 1473. I do not think he could have been the brother of Joan's husband Thomas because Thomas' father died in 1342. Possibly the witness to the assignment of dower could have been the Richard who was a brother of Thomas, but the Richard who testified in 1425, age 52, could not have been the son of a man who died in 1342.

Thanks for the reference to the MacNamara book. It is also available at HathiTrust, https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044081235061 and the Internet Archive, https://archive.org/details/memorialsofdanve00macn/page/n8.

Both MacNamara and Lee assert that the many Quatermain families living in the 1600s and later in Oxfordshire were descendants of the medieval Quatermain family they discuss, but neither provides any path of descent from the medieval family to a modern one.

I have deduced that the two Hierome Quatermains mentioned in my first post were not the same man. The one whose wife was Marian Childe (my ancestor) died in 1617, and Mary Marshall who married a Hierome Quatermain in 1588 married her second husband John Bradford in 1602/03. Her son Richard Quatermain bequeathed to four Quatermain siblings and three Bradford siblings-in-law, but didn't mention any of the the children of Hierome Quatermain and Marian Childe in his 1620 will.
John Higgins
2019-09-05 03:56:08 UTC
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Post by Jan Wolfe
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Post by John Higgins
The second Richard Quatremayns mentioned above (whose birth year is presumably 1373 rather than 1473) could be the Richard Quartermain who appears in the first page of the Quartermain pedigree in Lee's history of the church of Thame. He would have been the brother-in-law of Joan, widow of Thomas Quatremayns, whose assignment of dower in 1400 is cited above.
The families of Quatremayns and Baldington were closely connected with the Danvers family. F. N. Macnamara's "Memorials of the Danvers Family" (avilable online via the FHL) has some discussion of the Quartemains family. He relies largely on Lee's work, with some different interpretations, and may not address your particular question - but it might be worthe a look.
Ah, the perennial century typo! Yes, this Richard Quatremayns was born about 1373, not 1473. I do not think he could have been the brother of Joan's husband Thomas because Thomas' father died in 1342. Possibly the witness to the assignment of dower could have been the Richard who was a brother of Thomas, but the Richard who testified in 1425, age 52, could not have been the son of a man who died in 1342.
Thanks for the reference to the MacNamara book. It is also available at HathiTrust, https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044081235061 and the Internet Archive, https://archive.org/details/memorialsofdanve00macn/page/n8.
Both MacNamara and Lee assert that the many Quatermain families living in the 1600s and later in Oxfordshire were descendants of the medieval Quatermain family they discuss, but neither provides any path of descent from the medieval family to a modern one.
I have deduced that the two Hierome Quatermains mentioned in my first post were not the same man. The one whose wife was Marian Childe (my ancestor) died in 1617, and Mary Marshall who married a Hierome Quatermain in 1588 married her second husband John Bradford in 1602/03. Her son Richard Quatermain bequeathed to four Quatermain siblings and three Bradford siblings-in-law, but didn't mention any of the the children of Hierome Quatermain and Marian Childe in his 1620 will.
I should have clarified that I think that the "second Richard Quatremayns" could well be two different people. The Richard Quatremayns who witnessed the assignment of Dower in 1400 could be the Richard who is the brother of Thomas, while the Richard Quatremayns, aged 52 in 1425 at the proof of age for Thomas Baldington, may be a separate person entirely. There's no reason why we have to conclude that they're the same person.

But this doesn't get you any closer to resolving your question. I wish we had better information and sources on this family...
Jan Wolfe
2019-09-05 16:30:56 UTC
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On Wednesday, September 4, 2019 at 11:56:10 PM UTC-4, John Higgins wrote:
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Post by John Higgins
I should have clarified that I think that the "second Richard Quatremayns" could well be two different people. The Richard Quatremayns who witnessed the assignment of Dower in 1400 could be the Richard who is the brother of Thomas, while the Richard Quatremayns, aged 52 in 1425 at the proof of age for Thomas Baldington, may be a separate person entirely. There's no reason why we have to conclude that they're the same person.
But this doesn't get you any closer to resolving your question. I wish we had better information and sources on this family...
I agree that the "second Richard Quatremayns" could well be two different people. The following CP suit indicates that Richard, brother of Thomas, was still living in Easter Term 1416 http://aalt.law.uh.edu/H5/CP40no621/bCP40no621dorses/IMG_1214.htm (search for Katermayn in the index, http://www.uh.edu/waalt/index.php/CP40/621).

The medieval soldier database has records for a Richard Quatremayns in the 1380s which could well be for the Richard who was a brother of the Thomas who died in the late 1390s.
Jan Wolfe
2019-09-06 15:28:15 UTC
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Archdeaconry of Oxford wills suggest that the father of Heirome/Jerome Quatermaine (d. 1617) was Thomas (d.c. 1577) and that Thomas' parents were Roger (d. 1549) and Alice (d. 1559). The wills of Heirome/Jerome and Heirome's son William, however, show that this William was not the William Quatermaine who I have identified as my ancestor. I have requested William Fowler Carter, _The Quatremains of Oxfordshire_ (1936) from inter library loan to see if Carter has connected any of the 16th century Quatremains to the medieval family.
John Higgins
2019-09-06 19:03:38 UTC
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Post by Jan Wolfe
Archdeaconry of Oxford wills suggest that the father of Heirome/Jerome Quatermaine (d. 1617) was Thomas (d.c. 1577) and that Thomas' parents were Roger (d. 1549) and Alice (d. 1559). The wills of Heirome/Jerome and Heirome's son William, however, show that this William was not the William Quatermaine who I have identified as my ancestor. I have requested William Fowler Carter, _The Quatremains of Oxfordshire_ (1936) from inter library loan to see if Carter has connected any of the 16th century Quatremains to the medieval family.
Thanks for mentioning this book - hopefully it'll be useful.

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