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Goudelio Tsikandylis
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Filmwaves
2017-01-13 02:24:36 UTC
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.

I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.

Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?

regards

GT
Peter Stewart
2017-01-13 03:06:32 UTC
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Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.

Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".

Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.

Peter Stewart
Filmwaves
2017-01-13 03:39:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
You haven't changed the last 30 years either.
It's just the case of a Non Greek trying to tell a Greek how to write Greek names. Βασιλειος = Vassilios; Theodora = Theodora, and Angel = Angelos of course you can use the names Europeans use that I consider to be wrong in fact because Angel is always an Angel or Angelos and the word Angelina is meaningless. Your views do not mean that my comments are wrong or unsophisticated. Simply I follow the Greek Tradition and you don't.
Goudelios if it's a given name, it is not a Greek name; however the name exists as a surname, I am told, in the Baltic states, and they think they are descendent of Byzantine stock. I have no opinion, just try to help. Tsikandylis or Tzikandyles if you prefer,exists today in Crete (since 1195). The question is are the two names the same family, There are many other individuals like Emmanuel Tsikandylis, Logios, living in Mistra around 1400. Always individual names, no wives, no children, etc.

If you know a specific reference, I will be grateful, If you don't, thank you for your reply.
GT
P J Evans
2017-01-13 04:03:01 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
A couple of sample results:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Peter Stewart
2017-01-13 04:50:17 UTC
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Post by P J Evans
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
But Dr Tsambourakis think he knows too much to bother about the name
forms that other people use, including the individuals themselves and
most published writers today.

He is an ideologue and supposes that modern Greek usages and his own
idiosyncratic transliterations should be imposed on Byzantine people,
even if this means he cannot locate basic information about them without
asking for help then ignoring it and insulting anyone who provides it.

Ho hum. No wonder he comes creeping back here anonymously in the guise
of "Filmwaves".

Peter Stewart
//
Filmwaves
2017-01-13 09:53:16 UTC
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Post by P J Evans
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.


“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
Peter Stewart
2017-01-13 10:07:55 UTC
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Post by Filmwaves
Post by P J Evans
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?

Peter Stewart
Filmwaves
2017-01-13 20:21:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Post by P J Evans
Post by Peter Stewart
Post by Filmwaves
Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States. Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is "Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis, Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
Allegedly, after 1454 they migrated to Trapezond and after the fall of Trapezond migrated to Russia (Odessa) and from Odessa moved north, one married a Russian princess (of German descent) and after a local war, the couple escaped to Latvia? and that's how the family finished up in the Baltic States.
I may have the name of the princess if you are interested.
Peter Stewart
2017-01-13 22:04:56 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States.
Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is
"Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from
Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families
were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis,
Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved
in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
If you want to return to the Tzikandyles family, you might start from these men living in the 12th century (relationships unknown) and follow the sources cited:

Leon Tzikandeles (died 1130), married to an unidentified Anna Komnene, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=161361

Basileios Goudelios Tzikandyles (whom you mentioned in your first posting), http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=151638

Goudelios Tzykandeles, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=152981

If you are interested in the derivation of their surname, try getting hold of Ernst Trapp's article 'Die Etymologie des Namens Tzikandeles' in *Jahrbuch der österreichischen Byzantinistik* 22 (1973).

Peter Stewart
Filmwaves
2017-01-15 00:15:10 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
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Post by Peter Stewart
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States.
Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is
"Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from
Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families
were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis,
Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved
in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
Leon Tzikandeles (died 1130), married to an unidentified Anna Komnene, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=161361
Basileios Goudelios Tzikandyles (whom you mentioned in your first posting), http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=151638
Goudelios Tzykandeles, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=152981
If you are interested in the derivation of their surname, try getting hold of Ernst Trapp's article 'Die Etymologie des Namens Tzikandeles' in *Jahrbuch der österreichischen Byzantinistik* 22 (1973).
Peter Stewart
I tried to borrow the book (and many other books) from the Public Library but unfortunately there is only copy and the last borrower did not return it.
Taking into account that there were allegedly very religious and patriots part of the name is Κανδηλι = devoted (today = candle); I don't know the meaning of the start: Tzi = Tsi = Zi = Xi

Emmanuel was the last in Peloponnese, and from 1500 the family appears in Crete.

I will try again to borrow the book.
Peter Stewart
2017-01-15 00:39:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Stewart
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States.
Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is
"Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from
Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families
were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis,
Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved
in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
Leon Tzikandeles (died 1130), married to an unidentified Anna Komnene, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=161361
Basileios Goudelios Tzikandyles (whom you mentioned in your first posting), http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=151638
Goudelios Tzykandeles, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=152981
If you are interested in the derivation of their surname, try getting hold of Ernst Trapp's article 'Die Etymologie des Namens Tzikandeles' in *Jahrbuch der österreichischen Byzantinistik* 22 (1973).
Peter Stewart
I tried to borrow the book (and many other books) from the Public Library but unfortunately there is only copy and the last borrower did not return it.
Taking into account that there were allegedly very religious and patriots part of the name is Κανδηλι = devoted (today = candle); I don't know the meaning of the start: Tzi = Tsi = Zi = Xi
Emmanuel was the last in Peloponnese, and from 1500 the family appears in Crete.
I will try again to borrow the book.
You can find a copy in the Baillieu Library at Melbourne University,
http://cat.lib.unimelb.edu.au/search/i?SEARCH=0378-8660.

Or if you are keen enough you can buy a copy here,
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at/Jahrbuch-der-Oesterreichischen-Byzantinistik-22.-Band

Peter Stewart
Peter Stewart
2017-01-15 01:07:59 UTC
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos,
daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and
Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known,
there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a
brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I
wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I
must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,”
Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States.
Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is
"Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from
Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families
were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis,
Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved
in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
If you want to return to the Tzikandyles family, you might start
from these men living in the 12th century (relationships unknown)
Leon Tzikandeles (died 1130), married to an unidentified Anna
Komnene, http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=161361
Basileios Goudelios Tzikandyles (whom you mentioned in your first
posting), http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=151638
Goudelios Tzykandeles,
http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=152981
If you are interested in the derivation of their surname, try
getting hold of Ernst Trapp's article 'Die Etymologie des Namens
Tzikandeles' in *Jahrbuch der österreichischen Byzantinistik* 22
(1973).
Peter Stewart
I tried to borrow the book (and many other books) from the Public
Library but unfortunately there is only copy and the last borrower
did not return it.
Taking into account that there were allegedly very religious and
patriots part of the name is Κανδηλι = devoted (today = candle); I
don't know the meaning of the start: Tzi = Tsi = Zi = Xi
Emmanuel was the last in Peloponnese, and from 1500 the family appears in Crete.
I will try again to borrow the book.
You can find a copy in the Baillieu Library at Melbourne University,
http://cat.lib.unimelb.edu.au/search/i?SEARCH=0378-8660.
Or if you are keen enough you can buy a copy here,
http://verlag.oeaw.ac.at/Jahrbuch-der-Oesterreichischen-Byzantinistik-22.-Band
Potentially to save you trouble, I should have added that according to
Trapp the name Tzikandeles was derived from the Latin 'cicindela', a
glow-worm.

Peter Stewart
Peter Stewart
2017-01-13 21:59:45 UTC
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Goudelio Tsikandylis "Pansevastos", married Eudoxia Angelos, daughter of the Sicilian Admiral Konstantinos Angelos and Theodora Komninos, Daughter of Emperor Alexios I.
I know the family Tsikandylis did exist and were well known, there was also a General Vassilios Tsikandylis, perhaps a brother or son of the above and there were others.
Is there more information about Goudelio? What does "Goudelio" mean?
You still haven't learned that Byzantine ladies used feminine forms of
their surnames - those mentioned in your post named themselves (and are
conventionally named by historians today) Eudokia Angelina and Theodora
Komnene respectively.
Goudelios was a given name and surname. It was also the second name of
Basileios Tzikandyles, whom you unhelpfully choose to call "Vassilios
Tsikandylis".
Try a Google search, and/or a Google Books search, using the
conventional spelling of his names.
Peter Stewart
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eudokia_Angelina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodora_Komnene
Thank you very much, I received numerous replies and everything is now fine.
Just in case somebody is interested in the Goudelis family and I wrote it deliberately in Greek) this article maybe of interest. I must admit I just received the reference I did not know it existed.
“The Goudelis Family in Italy after the Fall of Constantinople,” Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies 33 No. 2 (2009): 168–179.
What light do you anticipate that an article about the Goudelis family
in the 15th-century will shed on your question about the Tzikandyles
family in the 12th century?
Peter Stewart
I don't really know, I only try to help a family from the Baltic States. Their DNA shows (allegedly): 50% Greek. The father of the lady is "Gudelis". Both names Gudelis and Tsikandylis may be Latin, Gudelis from Gudelli and Tsikandylis from something like "Ciccadilli". Both families were known those days (1100-1200). There was a Leo Gudelis, Protospatharios and later General; The Gudelis family were also involved in the Church. To many ananswered questions.
If you want to return to the Tzikandyles family, you might start from
these men living in the 12th century (relationships unknown) and follow
the sources cited:

Leon Tzikandeles (died 1130), married to an unidentified Anna Komnene,
http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=161361

Basileios Goudelios Tzikandyles (whom you mentioned in your first
posting), http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=151638

Goudelios Tzykandeles,
http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/jsp/person.jsp?personKey=152981

If you are interested in the derivation of their surname, try getting
hold of Ernst Trapp's article 'Die Etymologie des Namens Tzikandeles' in
* Jahrbuch der österreichischen Byzantinistik* 22 (1973).

Peter Stewart
m***@gmail.com
2018-06-12 14:50:06 UTC
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Hello Dr. Stewart,

I would be very interested to read and learn more on this family, perhaps my family. I found the article from Dr. Jonathan Harris, but to be completely honest, I am not even sure this is even a possible ancestry link? The name looks very similar to my maiden name but that doesn’t mean anything. I literally have no knowledge, aside from my own research, about Byzantine history and I thank you and/or anyone who is willing to give me any information to direct me on my journey.

I just really want to know as much information about my family as possible whether or not this pans out to be anything. This visceral ‘need to know’ is heightened now that I no longer have a grandparent to ask. Which is so sad that another generation is forever gone.
From there I want to immerse myself in understanding this time period for example researching the types of food they ate, how long did they stay in a particular region, the customs of the time, or whatever “they as a culture” went through...any additional information beyond that really is an added bonus.

I may be completely missing the mark because unless there is a paper trail to some extent this is all speculation. Now, since I am clearly not versed in this topic as you all are...where do I begin?

Thank you,
Megan

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