Discussion:
Ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
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HWinnSadler
2018-03-19 00:50:57 UTC
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
j***@gmail.com
2018-03-19 13:24:07 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I would refer you to "The Ancestry of Eve of Leinster", The Genealogist (1980), 4-27 by David Kelley if you are researching the ancestors of Aoife. I don't have a copy handy.

Also: https://web.archive.org/web/20160316165131/http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~medieval/llywelyn.htm

has this reference and many more.

Presumably, Donnchad mac Cellaig was the son of Cellach mac Cerbaill mac Dungal who is (by tradition) descended back to (possibly legendary) Óengus Osrithe. Where legend ends, and reality starts for the Kings of Osraige, I am not sure.

--JC
Hawk
2018-03-20 22:37:57 UTC
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On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:50:57 -0700 (PDT), HWinnSadler
Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
1 GillaPátraic mac Donnchadh 996
2 Donnchadh mac Ceallach 976
3 Aiofe ingen Fáeláin
4 Ceallach mac Cearbhall 13-Sep-908
6. Fáelán mac Cormaic, +966 King of the Déisi (of Munster)
8 Cearbhall mac Dúngaile 888
16 Dúngaile mac Feargal 842
32. Feargal mac Anmchada, King of Ossory/Ri Osraige, 790-802

Hope this helps,
Cheers
d***@aol.com
2018-03-21 01:09:28 UTC
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Post by Hawk
On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:50:57 -0700 (PDT), HWinnSadler
Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
1 GillaPátraic mac Donnchadh 996
2 Donnchadh mac Ceallach 976
3 Aiofe ingen Fáeláin
4 Ceallach mac Cearbhall 13-Sep-908
6. Fáelán mac Cormaic, +966 King of the Déisi (of Munster)
8 Cearbhall mac Dúngaile 888
16 Dúngaile mac Feargal 842
32. Feargal mac Anmchada, King of Ossory/Ri Osraige, 790-802
Hope this helps,
Cheers
1. Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige (d. c. 996)
2. Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige (d. c. 976)
3. Echrad ingen Matudan of Ulster = Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d.c. 908)
4. Matudan II MacAeda, King of Ulster (d. c. 949)
5. Aed III MacEochocain, King of Ulster (d. c. 919)
6. Inderb ingen Mael Duin (b. c. 820) = Eochucan, King of Ulster (d. c. 882)
7. Mael-duin, King of Ailech (d. c. 866)
8. Aed Oirdnide, High King of Ireland (d. c. 819)
9. Niall II Frossach MacFergal, High King of Ireland (d. c. 778)
10. Fergal McMael Duin, High King of Ireland (d. c. 722)

References:

(1) Turton, William Harry. The Plantagenet ancestry. (Baltimore, MD:
Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993).

(2) Baldwin, Stewart. Eve of Leinster and Radnailt of Dublin.
soc.genealogy.medieval post 28 Jul 1996.

(3) Kelley, David H. The Ancestry of Eve of Leinster. The Genealogist i(1) (Spring 1980), pp. 4-27.

(4) Mac Niocaill, Gearoid. Ireland before the Vikings. (Dublin:Gill and Macmillan, 1972).

(5) Kelley, David H. Descents from the High Kings of Ireland. The American Genealogist, liv, Jan 1978, pp. 1-5.

(6) Kelley, David H. The claimed Irish origin of Clan Munro. The American Genealogist, xlv, Apr 1969, pp. 65-78.

(7) O'Corrain, Donncha. Ireland before the Normans. (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1972).

Hope this helps even better,
Cheers
Hawk
2018-03-21 22:41:21 UTC
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Post by Hawk
On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:50:57 -0700 (PDT), HWinnSadler
Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
1 GillaPátraic mac Donnchadh 996
2 Donnchadh mac Ceallach 976
3 Aiofe ingen Fáeláin
4 Ceallach mac Cearbhall 13-Sep-908
6. Fáelán mac Cormaic, +966 King of the Déisi (of Munster)
8 Cearbhall mac Dúngaile 888
16 Dúngaile mac Feargal 842
32. Feargal mac Anmchada, King of Ossory/Ri Osraige, 790-802
Hope this helps,
Cheers
1. Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige (d. c. 996)
2. Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige (d. c. 976)
3. Echrad ingen Matudan of Ulster = Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d.c. 908)
4. Matudan II MacAeda, King of Ulster (d. c. 949)
5. Aed III MacEochocain, King of Ulster (d. c. 919)
6. Inderb ingen Mael Duin (b. c. 820) = Eochucan, King of Ulster (d. c. 882)
7. Mael-duin, King of Ailech (d. c. 866)
8. Aed Oirdnide, High King of Ireland (d. c. 819)
9. Niall II Frossach MacFergal, High King of Ireland (d. c. 778)
10. Fergal McMael Duin, High King of Ireland (d. c. 722)
Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993).
(2) Baldwin, Stewart. Eve of Leinster and Radnailt of Dublin.
soc.genealogy.medieval post 28 Jul 1996.
(3) Kelley, David H. The Ancestry of Eve of Leinster. The Genealogist i(1) (Spring 1980), pp. 4-27.
(4) Mac Niocaill, Gearoid. Ireland before the Vikings. (Dublin:Gill and Macmillan, 1972).
(5) Kelley, David H. Descents from the High Kings of Ireland. The American Genealogist, liv, Jan 1978, pp. 1-5.
(6) Kelley, David H. The claimed Irish origin of Clan Munro. The American Genealogist, xlv, Apr 1969, pp. 65-78.
(7) O'Corrain, Donncha. Ireland before the Normans. (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1972).
Hope this helps even better,
Cheers
It does indeed, thanks. I forgot to add my source, which is....
"THE PRACTICE OF IRISH KINGSHIP IN THE CENTRAL MIDDLE AGES"
by Mark Joseph Zumbuhl (2005)

Cheers
HWinnSadler
2018-03-22 02:29:04 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
Thank you for the contributions!
HWinnSadler
2018-03-22 02:33:27 UTC
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I would like to inquire about-

Echrad ingen Matudan of Ulster = Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d.c. 908)

Is there a primary source for this link?
d***@aol.com
2018-03-22 12:43:14 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I would like to inquire about-
Echrad ingen Matudan of Ulster = Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d.c. 908)
Is there a primary source for this link?
These are all secondary sources, however, you can check what source documents the authors used.

-Kelley, David H. The Ancestry of Eve of Leinster. The Genealogist i(1) (Spring 1980), pp. 4-27.

-Mac Niocaill, Gearoid. Ireland before the Vikings. (Dublin:Gill and Macmillan, 1972).

-Kelley, David H. Descents from the High Kings of Ireland. The American Genealogist, liv, Jan 1978, pp. 1-5.

-Kelley, David H. The claimed Irish origin of Clan Munro. The American Genealogist, xlv, Apr 1969, pp. 65-78.

-O'Corrain, Donncha. Ireland before the Normans. (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1972).
HWinnSadler
2018-03-22 17:48:42 UTC
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The Book of Lecan, ca. 1400, provides a relevant source for the marriage of Echrad ingen Matudan and Cellach mac Cerbaill: "Echrad ingen Madadain m. Cellaig rig Osraidi, mathair
Dondchada m. Aeda; 7 mathair Muirchertaig (ob. 976)
m. Domnaill hUi Neill."
r***@gmail.com
2018-03-23 13:34:02 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
In terms of his ancestry in male, the simplest source to access is Bart Jaski's useful genealogical tables of Irish royal dynasties, which may be accessed at: https://www.academia.edu/4144299/Genealogical_tables_of_medieval_Irish_royal_dynasties
The two tables covering Osraige kings are found at pp. 126-7.

As to the wives of the kings of Osraige, the earliest source we have (other than individual annal entries) is the "History of Women," found in several manuscripts, including the books of Leinster, Ui Maine, Lecan and Ballymote. These mss. were edited by Margaret C. Dobbs, and can be found (with part translated, and an index) in volumes 47-49. These are available at www.archive.org, and highly recommended.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-23 21:39:02 UTC
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I looked into "Genealogical Tables of Medieval Irish Royal Dynasties", which confirms the ancestry of the Kings of Osraige. The Book of Lecan, at first glance, would appear to confirm that Echrad, daughter of Matudán mac Áeda, was the mother of Donnchad mac Cerbaill (ancestor of Aoife/Eve of Leinster). This is what David Kelley seems to propose. However, on this board, Stewart Baldwin has brought up some problems with this proposed link.
d***@aol.com
2018-03-24 13:08:09 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I looked into "Genealogical Tables of Medieval Irish Royal Dynasties", which confirms the ancestry of the Kings of Osraige. The Book of Lecan, at first glance, would appear to confirm that Echrad, daughter of Matudán mac Áeda, was the mother of Donnchad mac Cerbaill (ancestor of Aoife/Eve of Leinster). This is what David Kelley seems to propose. However, on this board, Stewart Baldwin has brought up some problems with this proposed link.
Below is a post from 1998 by Luke Stevens which is a reply to Stephen Baldwin’s skepticism for Echrad of Ulster being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige. The objection by Baldwin seems to hinge on several tampering acts done by mischievous Lecan scribes, which seems to be a stretch to change the original emendation found in The Book of Lecan. The most plausible explanation given in response to Baldwin’s objections is:

“While this series of largely unmotivated little changes may be at least
possible, it seems to me like grasping at straws. The much simpler and
more plausible explanation, which convincingly addresses all but the
last of these in one fell swoop, is that the Lecan scribe learned that
Echrad was also the mother of Donnchad, and the error arose as the
sentence so stating was rearranged and transcribed, as I said before.” END OF QUOTE

The SGM post titled “Echrad mother of Cellach of Ossory?” which is a reply to Stephen Baldwin’s objections to Echrad of Ulster as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige (d. c. 976) is below:

“You raise some excellent objections to my objections to your objections
to Kelley's emendation. :)

Rather than quoting the now lengthy entire discussion, let me summarize:

I originally said:
1. The chronology is possible, though long, and need not be further
considered.
2. An error of transposing two adjacent items is intrinsically more
likely than one of transplanting material from farther down.
3. The placement of Echrad in BS 188:8 indicates rearrangement, and
together with the "7 mathair" indicates the original form I
suggested, which provides a likely cause for a transpositional error.
4. The following entry provides a reason to mention the mother of
Donnchad mac Cellaig in such a way and place.
5. The title of Cellach is different in 188:9.
6. The spelling of "Cellaig" as "Ceallaig" is also different.
7. Therefore the "Cellaig rig Osraidi" did not come from there.

To which your reply was that:
1. You no longer consider Echrad as the mother of Donnchad mac Aeda,
but rather propose that an entire line was wrongly inserted:
"m. Cellaig rig Osraidi, mathair Dondchada", which you bracketed.
(or was this your original idea and I misunderstood?)
2. The title of Cellach was altered after the error, we suppose.
3. The minor idiosyncracies in spelling are irrelevant.
4. The parallel entries give only one child to Echrad.

I must say, this is certainly an improvement, and a clever one at that!
Post by HWinnSadler
However, attempting to correct an error in a text by emendation is
serious business, and needs to be supported by good evidence if it is
to be accepted. Just showing that the emendation is consistent with
other known information is not enough.
Agreed. The idea here is to show firstly that the emendation I support
is consistent with the evidence, and then that any other emendation is
untenable, or at least far less likely, using the only relevant evidence
available, the internal evidence of the Ban-Shenchus. Together these
constitute a sufficient reason to accept the link. Since the latter part
involves my shooting down any alternative emendation, you can guess
what's coming below.
Post by HWinnSadler
I think it is more likely that the changes occurred in the other
order, in which case your objection would not be valid.
You are right, of course, that the title of Cellach may have been
changed last. An explanation of why this might have occurred still
eludes me, unless perhaps the entry was originally drawn from an
independent source (which would be bad news for your emendation).
But all my other points points still stand.
Post by HWinnSadler
This is a simple scribal slip in which the copyist's eye slips down a
few lines, probably caused by the name "Dondchad" on both lines.
To my way of seeing, this is not one scribal error you propose, but two:
firstly, the eye must slip down a few lines and begin copying, and then
the eye must slip back up to the beginning of the same line the scribe
thinks he has just copied; and then, a moment later when he copies the
interpolated line yet again, he fails to notice that they are the same.
Certainly this makes better sense than the error you previously
proposed, but still it seems much less likely than what I claim.

Considering the lengths of the words and such, for your emendation to be
correct, the earlier text for Lecan must have run something like:

ri Ailig. item. Echrad ingen Madadain m /
Aeda 7 mathair Muirchertaig m Domnaill /
hUi Neill. item. Cacht ingen Dondchada m /
Cellaig rig Osraidi mathair Dondchada m /
Congalaig. item. Ragnailt ingen Amlaib /

I do not see what you mean about the "Dondchada". In fact there is
nothing here to confuse a copyist's eyes at the point in question, much
less to interpolate the fourth line between the first two. So the error
you propose is not only intrinsically unlikely, IMHO, but also lacks any
apparent cause.

Now what is the "7" (i.e. "and") doing there? We still have Echrad being
moved to the beginning of the entry, and the original clearly did not
have the "7", nor would there be any compelling reason to insert it.
Post by HWinnSadler
but the fact that other versions of BS give only one child to Echrad
gives further confirmation.
My whole point is that the Lecan scribe learned of another child of
Echrad by a different husband and included this information. There are
plenty of other cases of this happening in both prose versions, and the
Lecan entry is not even worded in the same way.
Post by HWinnSadler
(The minor idiosyncracies in spelling from one version to another are
not really relevant here.)
After reading hundreds of pages of Irish documents from all times and
places I have almost forgotten how to spell. But there are certain
discrete changes in orthography that occur, and one of them is the
change from "e" to "ea" in the applicable places, with the advent of the
new orthography. You will, for example, find the latter almost nowhere
in the genealogies of Rawlinson B 502 nor in the poetic version of BS.
An analysis of these kinds of details would throw an interesting light
on the compilation of the Ban Shenchus.

This is why I bring up the issue of spelling, since "Cellaig" (Old
Irish) indicates a source that, in comparison with one containing
"Ceallaig" (early Modern Irish, later "Ceallaigh"), is older, or at
least has not been transmitted through a scribe who went about
converting names to the new orthography. The differences in spelling
between BS 188:8 and 188:9 are explained quite nicely if the compiler
drew from another source, which he left intact, for the additional
information in 188:8. But if this is just a duplicate of a line farther
down, then it ought to be spelt the same way, and if a scribe ever came
by and started adding the a's as he copied, he would have no reason to
do it to one Cellaig and not the other. This may seem like making a
mountain out of a molehill, but such details are what we have to go on.

So, your emendation would seem to require several mischievous little
scribes, who in turn tampered with the text as follows:
1. correctly rearranged the entry putting Echrad at the beginning
2. skipped down a few lines, copied, and then skipped back up to the
point of departure (rather than the next line) without noticing
3. saw the two "mathair" phrases next to each other and inserted an "7"
without even bothering to remove the second "mathair"
4. converted the "e" in one "Cellaig" to "ea" (or vice versa?) but
inconsistently neglected to do the same to the identical word in
the adjacent entry
5. changed the title of Cellach in the second entry for no good reason

While this series of largely unmotivated little changes may be at least
possible, it seems to me like grasping at straws. The much simpler and
more plausible explanation, which convincingly addresses all but the
last of these in one fell swoop, is that the Lecan scribe learned that
Echrad was also the mother of Donnchad, and the error arose as the
sentence so stating was rearranged and transcribed, as I said before.

Short of a much more thorough analysis of the Ban Shenchus as a whole
(which may appear in the upcoming new edition you mentioned and about
which I am still curious), I doubt there is much more of any import to
say on the issue. Whether I have soundly established the emendation I
support as sufficiently more likely than the alternative is a judgement
call. You always take such a staunchly skeptical view of things (an
admirable quality) that I wonder whether I have convinced anyone.
Post by HWinnSadler
Unfortunately, I think we are going to have to try and scrounge a Ui
Neill descent for Eve of Leinster in some other way.
Never fear; I am about to dredge up another weak link and strengthen it
considerably (IMHO) in the following message.

Luke Stevens” END OF QUOTE.
d***@aol.com
2018-03-24 20:52:18 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I looked into "Genealogical Tables of Medieval Irish Royal Dynasties", which confirms the ancestry of the Kings of Osraige. The Book of Lecan, at first glance, would appear to confirm that Echrad, daughter of Matudán mac Áeda, was the mother of Donnchad mac Cerbaill (ancestor of Aoife/Eve of Leinster). This is what David Kelley seems to propose. However, on this board, Stewart Baldwin has brought up some problems with this proposed link.
Dr. David H. Kelley surely believed in The Book of Lecan's confirmation that Echrad, daughter of Matudán mac Áeda, was the mother of Donnchad mac Cerbaill. Despite the different objections and complicated analyses to Dr. Kelley's emendation found throughout the SGM archives, it should be pointed out that Dr. Kelley was not only a superb genealogist but also a gifted epigrapher. He worked extensively on scripts and linguistics in his archaeological career. If any genealogist would have discovered scribal errors in a text, it would have been Dr. Kelley.
r***@gmail.com
2018-03-24 16:39:13 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
In this whole discussion, I have not seen (but certainly may have missed) any reference to the other mention of Echrad in Dobbs' Revue Celtique article. Following her transcription of the Book of Lecan version, she gives the version in The Book of Ua Maine (from the Royal Irish Academy, available in digital form [as is the Book of Lecan] at https://www.isos.dias.ie/english/index.html.

In Revue Celtique, XLVIII, 227, 3, we find:

Ingean Madadain (ob. 949) m. Aeda .1. Eachrad, mathair Muircertaig (ob. 976) m. Domnaill Arda Mâcha, athair Flaitbertaig in Trostân (ob. 1036).

Now compare this to Revue Celtique, XLVIII, 188, 8:

Echrad ingen Madadain m. Cellaig rig Osraidi, mathair Dondchada m. Aeda ; 7 mathair Muirchertaig (ob. 976) m. Domnaill Ui Neill.

The metrical version in the Book of Leinster, written from a prose source by Gilla Mo Dutu Ua Casaide in 1147, also has no reference to Ossory.

One the surface, I do not think we do not need complicated explanations. The Lecan scribe inserted "m. Cellaig rig Osraidi, mathair Dondchada" and the symbol for "and." I am not sure we have to question how this happened, as I believe Leinster and Ua Maine provide us with a glimpse of the original form.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-24 17:50:54 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
All this talk of scribal errors leaves me confused. Should Echrad ingen Matudan be accepted as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig? If so, one can connect Aoife/Eve of Leinster to the semi-legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages.
s***@mindspring.com
2018-03-29 20:42:17 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
All this talk of scribal errors leaves me confused. Should Echrad ingen Matudan be accepted as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig? If so, one can connect Aoife/Eve of Leinster to the semi-legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages.
This alleged link is no more than wishful thinking, and should be completely rejected. In outline, the reasons are as follows:

1. Even in the absence of other evidence, the chronology is problematic.

2. The passage appearing in the Book of Lecan is clearly corrupt, and requires significant changes in order to turn it into the statement which supposedly supports the claim.

3. The claim that some scribe with additional information entered that information, which was then later corrupted in a rather unusual way, but can now be "uncorrupted" by a later argument, which just happens to give a "desirable" result, is an extreme version of wishful thinking, and should be regarded as a "red flag" of major proportions.

4. The version in the Book of Ballymote, which was not published in Dobbs's edition, and to which David Kelley did not have access, gives a clear indication of how the corruption in the Book of Lecan occurred, showing that the additional words in the Book of Lecan entry are an erroneous intrusion, and have no authority whatsoever.

The full details appeared in my article "On a Supposed Descent from the High Kings of Ireland," The American Genealogist 76 (2001): 282–87.

Stewart Baldwin
d***@aol.com
2018-03-29 21:19:26 UTC
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Post by s***@mindspring.com
The full details appeared in my article "On a Supposed Descent from the High Kings of Ireland," The American Genealogist 76 (2001): 282–87.
Stewart Baldwin
The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in has been out of print for a while. It might help to share an excerpt from your article that discusses the new proposed wife (Sabh?) of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who was the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976).
d***@aol.com
2018-03-31 15:10:18 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Post by HWinnSadler
Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
All this talk of scribal errors leaves me confused. Should Echrad ingen Matudan be accepted as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig? If so, one can connect Aoife/Eve of Leinster to the semi-legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages.
In a much earlier thread, Stewart Baldwin stated: “In my opinion. this weak link is just too weak to consider this as a valid descent from Niall.”

Just as there can be claims made suggesting that Professor Kelley’s emendation of the text should not be accepted, there are other respected historical/genealogical professionals who suggest that it should be accepted.

In the outlined points below, many of these objections have already been addressed by others in the past on this newsgroup. I have no stake in the matter and felt those new to the newsgroup would benefit from this information. In the following, I am simply restating a lot of the previous responses to these points.
Post by s***@mindspring.com
1. Even in the absence of other evidence, the chronology is problematic.
“First, to address the chronology more concretely, here is a table of the known death dates and approximate birth dates required:

Cerball c.820-888, Matudan c.865-950, Muirchertach c.865-943, Cellach c.870-908 = Echrad c.885-? = Domnall, c.890-978, Donnchad c.905-976, Muirchertach c.920-976.

As to the chronology, though we do not have dates for Aed, father of Donnchad Finn, we do have dates for five of his brothers, which suggest that Aed probably died about 920. With Donnchad Finn dying 974, the only improvement in the chronology is a decade or so, with a lot more play.

Though this is less than ideal, it is certainly not implausible. There is a good decade or so of play with most of the dates, which are consistent with everything else we know, such as regnal years, and does not require bizarre marriage patterns or extraordinary longevity (greater than the ripe old age of 90). In fact, the obits themselves require something that looks like this.

But the more important issue is the textual emendation. If I understand what you are getting at, it is an alternative emendation replacing "Cellaig rig Osraidi" with "Aeda" and leaving the other "Aeda" intact.”
Post by s***@mindspring.com
2. The passage appearing in the Book of Lecan is clearly corrupt, and requires significant changes in order to turn it into the statement which supposedly supports the claim.
“First of all, as scribal errors go, a transpositional error involving two adjacent items, in this case the patronymics of two adjacent names, is very common, so that this can hardly be considered *radical*. But a substitutional error not resulting from misidentification, as you propose here, is especially rare. If a scribe loses his place and starts copying from a few lines down, which happens often enough, he will not then recover his original place, much less after the extent of one short name, unless he notices the error and is returning to correct it.

A transpositional error is especially common when a text is being reorganized as it is copied, e.g. when inverting a pedigree. I think there is some internal evidence in BS that this was the case for the
entry in question. BS 313 & 227 both essentially go: "Ingen Matudain m.Aeda, .i. Echrad, mathair Muircertaig..." whereas 188 reads "Echrad ingen Madadain...." 188 also uses the word "mother" twice, in contrast to all the surrounding entries, where children are given in a list, even BS 189:12, where such a format causes ambiguity. I think the original must have read something like: "The mother of Donnchad m. Cellaig, K. Ossory, was the daughter of Matudan m. Aeda, Echrad, the mother of Muirchertach Ua Neill." The compiler wants to say that Echrad, who was better known as the mother of Muirchertach, was also the mother of Donnchad, perhaps in preparation for the following entry, where his daughter Cacht is in turn said to be the mother of another Donnchad. But to fit the entry in the same format as the others, with the name of the mother first, the compiler had to rework the sentence, and in the process forgot to switch the patronymics.

It is all the more unlikely that the "m. Cellaig rig Osraidi" came from the following entry, in light of that it actually reads "Ceallaig ri Laigin (no leithrig Osraidi)." Note the different title (is it correct?). Both here and in 227 Ceallaig is spelt with an "ea". The spelling "Cellaig" must come from somewhere else, and probably an older original source at that.

IMHO, therefore, Kelley's emendation is sound and ought to be accepted.”
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3. The claim that some scribe with additional information entered that information, which was then later corrupted in a rather unusual way, but can now be "uncorrupted" by a later argument, which just happens to give a "desirable" result, is an extreme version of wishful thinking, and should be regarded as a "red flag" of major proportions.
The emendation that Stewart Baldwin proposes in the simplest terms requires several mischievous and unmotivated little scribes, who in turn tampered with the text as follows (which also seems to be a version of wishful thinking):

“1. Correctly rearranged the entry putting Echrad at the beginning.
2. Skipped down a few lines, copied, and then skipped back up to the point of departure (rather than the next line) without noticing.
3. Saw the two "mathair" phrases next to each other and inserted a "7" without even bothering to remove the second "mathair".
4. Converted the "e" in one "Cellaig" to "ea" (or vice versa?) but inconsistently neglected to do the same to the identical word in the adjacent entry.
5. Changed the title of Cellach in the second entry for no good reason.

While this series of largely unmotivated little changes may be at least possible, it seems to me like grasping at straws. The much simpler and more plausible explanation, which convincingly addresses all but the last of these in one fell swoop, is that the Lecan scribe learned that Echrad was also the mother of Donnchad, and the error arose as the sentence so stating was rearranged and transcribed, as I said before.”
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4. The version in the Book of Ballymote, which was not published in Dobbs's edition, and to which David Kelley did not have access, gives a clear indication of how the corruption in the Book of Lecan occurred, showing that the additional words in the Book of Lecan entry are an erroneous intrusion, and have no authority whatsoever.
It’s very hard to believe in the assumption that Professor David Kelley did not know about the Book of Ballymote. Furthermore, using his alleged lack of knowledge of this book as the reason to diminish Professor Kelley’s emendation of the Book of Lecan’s text clearly appears to be an attempt to strengthen one's objection to Professor Kelley. The Book of Ballymote was compiled towards the end of the 14th century at the castle of Ballymote for Tonnaltagh McDonagh, who was then in occupation of the castle. In 1785, it was returned to the Royal Irish Academy where it remained as one of the Academy's most treasured possessions. The work was photographed by the Academy in 1887 and two hundred copies of it were made. One copy is in the diocesan archives and others in libraries. The edition being referred to is, ‘The Book of Ballymote: Photographic facsimile with introduction by R. Atkinson, (Dublin 1887),’ which was published in 1887. Only personal correspondence from Professor Kelley himself, where he stated as such, would prove such a claim.
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The full details appeared in my article "On a Supposed Descent from the High Kings of Ireland," The American Genealogist 76 (2001): 282–87.
The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in is not readily available. Perhaps it would help if you shared the new proposed candidate for the wife of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who would have also been the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976)?!
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Stewart Baldwin
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2018-03-31 15:54:05 UTC
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The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in is not readily available. Perhaps it would help if you shared the new proposed candidate for the wife of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who would have also been the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976)?!
It's not clear what you mean by this, as several comments above have told you exactly how to receive a copy.

With the author's permission, and proof that you are a current or new subscriber to TAG, I'll send you a digital copy.
--Joe Cook
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The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in is not readily available. Perhaps it would help if you shared the new proposed candidate for the wife of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who would have also been the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976)?!
It's not clear what you mean by this, as several comments above have told you exactly how to receive a copy.
With the author's permission, and proof that you are a current or new subscriber to TAG, I'll send you a digital copy.
--Joe Cook
TAG 76.4/Oct 2001/241-360/OUT OF PRINT
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2018-03-31 23:58:54 UTC
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The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in is not readily available. Perhaps it would help if you shared the new proposed candidate for the wife of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who would have also been the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976)?!
It's not clear what you mean by this, as several comments above have told you exactly how to receive a copy.
With the author's permission, and proof that you are a current or new subscriber to TAG, I'll send you a digital copy.
--Joe Cook
TAG 76.4/Oct 2001/241-360/OUT OF PRINT
Yes, but copies already available are still obtainable. Also, americanancestors.org has all issues digitized on their website. Even this one (just pulled it up)
--Joe Cook
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2018-03-31 16:57:43 UTC
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The 2001 TAG publication that this particular article appears in is not readily available. Perhaps it would help if you shared the new proposed candidate for the wife of Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908), who would have also been the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig (d. 976)?!
My TAG article was concerned only with showing that the theory making Echrad the mother of Donnchad is not credible. To my knowledge, no candidate has been proposed in her place. Donnchad's mother is simply unknown (as is also the case for the vast majority of other early Irish kings). An outline of the case for rejecting Echrad's maternity of Donnchad is as follows.

Comparison with the closely related Book of Ballymote version clearly indicates where the additional words in the Book of Lecan version came from. The entry immediately following the entry on Echrad is also relevant. I have added asterisks to emphasize certain features.

Book of Ballymote version:
Echraid ingen Madagain mic * Aedha mathair Muirchertaig mic Domnaill .H. Neill.
Cacht ingen Dondchadha mic *Cellaig righ Osraidhe mathair Dondchada mic* Congalaig.

Book of Lecan version:
Echrad ingen Madadain mic *Cellaig rig Osraidi mathair Dondchada mic* Aeda & mathair Muirchertaig mic Domnaill .H. Neill.
Cacht ingen Dondchada mic *Ceallaig ri Laigin no leithrig Osraidi mathair Dondchada mic* Congalaig.

[".H." is the standard abbreviation for "Ua" and its various declensions.]

The important observations are the following:

1. With the exception of an additional ampersand and minor differences in spelling, the Book of Lecan entry for Echrad consists of the Book of Ballymote entry with the words between *...* from Cacht's entry in the Book of Ballymote accidently inserted into Echrad's entry (marked with an "*").

2. The Book of Lecan's entry on Cacht, which contains slightly different words between the two asterisks, is also corrupt, for the Donnchad mac Cellaig who was also king of Laigin (Leinster) was not the same man as Cacht's father, but a later descendant. Thus, the Book of Ballymote preserves the earlier version of the text more closely.

These two observations alone are sufficient to show us that the Book of Lecan has no authority on this matter, but there is an additional observation that allows us to deduce how the corruption occurred with a high degree of probability.

3. The last two words of the intruding passage ("Dondchada mic") are the same as the two words immediately preceding the intruding passage in Cacht's entry in the Book of Ballymote.

Thus, it is highly probable that the corruption (occurring in one or more manuscripts ancestral to the Book of Lecan version) occurred in the following way.

Step 1: In an ancestral manuscript, one copyists eye skipped from one occurrence of "Dondchada mic" to the next, causing him to accidently omit the words *Cellaig righ Osraidhe mathair Dondchada mic* from Cacht's entry. This type of error, where the scribe's eye skips from a word or phrase to the same word or phrase a bit further down, causing words to be omitted, is one of the most common copying errors in medieval manuscripts. Upon discovering the error, the usual procedure would have been to put the omitted words in the margin, with an indication of where they belonged.

Step 2. A later copyist, upon encountering the marginal words, accidently inserts them in the wrong place.

Step 3 (perhaps soon after step 2, perhaps in a later copy). The grammar problems in the entries for Echrad and Cacht (as they existed after step 2) are noticed. An inserted ampersand makes the grammar of Echrad's entry correct, but Cacht's entry is obviously incomplete at this stage. An apparently corrupt source is used to fill in the entry.

This scenario was criticized by those supporting Kelley's theory as being too "complicated" but this was in fact a common type of error in textual transmission. On the other hand, Kelley's theory requires a series of events similar to the following:

Step 1. A scribe possessing additional information adds it to the entry on Echrad to give the following (Kelley's suggested emendation of the Book of Lecan entry): "Echrad ingen Madadain mic Aeda mathair Dondchada mic Cellaig rig Osraidi & mathair Muirchertaig mic Domnaill .H. Neill."

Step 2: The entry then got scrambled in such a way that the word "Aeda" and the three words "Cellaig rig Osraidi" switched places to give the version appearing in the Book of Lecan, an extremely uncommon type of transmission error.

If we accept this version of events, we are then required to believe that it is a complete coincidence that the additional words appearing in the Book of Lecan version as it is today (i.e., the words between asterisks) are the same as a phrase appearing in the Book of Ballymote version, and that the corruption of the entry on Cacht in the Book of Lecan version is an unrelated coincidence.

It is too bad that the theory doesn't hold water, as it would be nice to have a descent of Aife ingen Diarmata ("Eve of Leinster)" from the Ui Neill kings. If one is willing to accept a "discontinuous" descent (i.e., a descent missing one or more generations), then the following line is available.

Amargen Ua Morda (d. 1097), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma.
Loigsech Ua Morda (d. 1149), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide.
Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda, m. Muirchertach Ua Tuathail (d. 1146), king of Ui Muiredaig.
Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail, m. Diarmait Mac Murchada (d. 1171), king of Laigin (Leinster).
Aife ingen Diarmata, m. Richard Strongbow.

Carrach Calma was a nickname of Donnchad (d. 969), a great-grandson of the Ui Neill king Flann Sinna. Gormlaith is called a daughter of Carrach Calma in the Book of Ui Maine version (obviously chronologically impossible) and a daughter of Mac Carraig Calma in the Book of Lecan version. Since surnames were already developing at that time, it is not clear whether "ingen Mac Carraig Calma" means "daughter of a son of Carrach Calma" (chronologically possible, but only if extreme circumstance are assumed) or daughter of a later descendant of Carrach Calma who was using "Mac Carraig Calma" as a surname (much more likely). The only son of Carrach Calma of whom I am aware was Oengus mac Carraig Calma, who died in 1017. There appears to be too little information about the descendants of Carrach Calma to determine the exact line of descent. While not impossible, it would be a stretch to assume that Oengus was the maternal grandfather of a man who died 132 years later after he did.

Stewart Baldwin
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2018-03-31 19:11:18 UTC
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It is too bad that the theory doesn't hold water, as it would be nice to have a descent of Aife ingen Diarmata ("Eve of Leinster)" from the Ui Neill kings. If one is willing to accept a "discontinuous" descent (i.e., a descent missing one or more generations), then the following line is available.
Amargen Ua Morda (d. 1097), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma.
Loigsech Ua Morda (d. 1149), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide.
Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda, m. Muirchertach Ua Tuathail (d. 1146), king of Ui Muiredaig.
Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail, m. Diarmait Mac Murchada (d. 1171), king of Laigin (Leinster).
Aife ingen Diarmata, m. Richard Strongbow.
Carrach Calma was a nickname of Donnchad (d. 969), a great-grandson of the Ui Neill king Flann Sinna. Gormlaith is called a daughter of Carrach Calma in the Book of Ui Maine version (obviously chronologically impossible) and a daughter of Mac Carraig Calma in the Book of Lecan version. Since surnames were already developing at that time, it is not clear whether "ingen Mac Carraig Calma" means "daughter of a son of Carrach Calma" (chronologically possible, but only if extreme circumstance are assumed) or daughter of a later descendant of Carrach Calma who was using "Mac Carraig Calma" as a surname (much more likely). The only son of Carrach Calma of whom I am aware was Oengus mac Carraig Calma, who died in 1017. There appears to be too little information about the descendants of Carrach Calma to determine the exact line of descent. While not impossible, it would be a stretch to assume that Oengus was the maternal grandfather of a man who died 132 years later after he did.
Stewart Baldwin
So this could be a hypothetical (even possible) line for those seeking a descent for Aoife of Leinster from Ui Neill kings:

1. Flann Sinna, King of Mide, High King of Ireland (d. 916)
2. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann (d. 915)
3. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach (d. ? )
4. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
5. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
6. mac Oengus Mac Carriag Calma (d. c. 1040) [missing generation]
7. mac mac Oengus Mac Carriag Calma (d. c. 1070) [missing generation]
8. [great-great-granddaughter of Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada]:
i.e., Gormlaith ingen mac mac Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
9. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
10. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
11. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin(Leinster) (d. 1171)
12. Aife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
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2018-04-06 17:57:34 UTC
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It is too bad that the theory doesn't hold water, as it would be nice to have a descent of Aife ingen Diarmata ("Eve of Leinster)" from the Ui Neill kings. If one is willing to accept a "discontinuous" descent (i.e., a descent missing one or more generations), then the following line is available.
Amargen Ua Morda (d. 1097), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma.
Loigsech Ua Morda (d. 1149), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide.
Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda, m. Muirchertach Ua Tuathail (d. 1146), king of Ui Muiredaig.
Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail, m. Diarmait Mac Murchada (d. 1171), king of Laigin (Leinster).
Aife ingen Diarmata, m. Richard Strongbow.
Carrach Calma was a nickname of Donnchad (d. 969), a great-grandson of the Ui Neill king Flann Sinna. Gormlaith is called a daughter of Carrach Calma in the Book of Ui Maine version (obviously chronologically impossible) and a daughter of Mac Carraig Calma in the Book of Lecan version. Since surnames were already developing at that time, it is not clear whether "ingen Mac Carraig Calma" means "daughter of a son of Carrach Calma" (chronologically possible, but only if extreme circumstance are assumed) or daughter of a later descendant of Carrach Calma who was using "Mac Carraig Calma" as a surname (much more likely). The only son of Carrach Calma of whom I am aware was Oengus mac Carraig Calma, who died in 1017. There appears to be too little information about the descendants of Carrach Calma to determine the exact line of descent. While not impossible, it would be a stretch to assume that Oengus was the maternal grandfather of a man who died 132 years later after he did.
Stewart Baldwin
Professor Baldwin, what exactly are you saying is available with the alternative line you mentioned from Ui Neill kings? You don't have to answer the following, but out of pure interest, do you have a descent from Eve of Leinster?

The passages in the Book of Ui Maine and the Book of Lecan that state Gormlaith 'ingen Carraig Calma' and Gormlaith 'ingen mac Carraig Calma' could both be inventions or corruptions of the original text. This is possible given that there is no exact or clearly defined line of descent from Donnchad 'Carrach Calma' (d. 969) to Gormlaith. You did follow up this post clarifying that there were three grandsons of Donnchad, namely Muirchertach ua Carraig (d. 1022), rigdamna of Tara, Conchobar ua Carraig (d. 1023), and Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033). However, would nothing else be available in the event that the passages in the Book of Ui Maine and the Book of Lecan are corrupt concerning Gormlaith's patronymic?
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2018-04-07 01:52:23 UTC
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The passages in the Book of Ui Maine and the Book of Lecan that state Gormlaith 'ingen Carraig Calma' and Gormlaith 'ingen mac Carraig Calma' could both be inventions or corruptions of the original text. This is possible given that there is no exact or clearly defined line of descent from Donnchad 'Carrach Calma' (d. 969) to Gormlaith. You did follow up this post clarifying that there were three grandsons of Donnchad, namely Muirchertach ua Carraig (d. 1022), rigdamna of Tara, Conchobar ua Carraig (d. 1023), and Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033). However, would nothing else be available in the event that the passages in the Book of Ui Maine and the Book of Lecan are corrupt concerning Gormlaith's patronymic?
While the reading from the Book of Ui Maine is clearly corrupt (since Gormlaith could not have been a daughter of Carrach Calma, I see no good reason to say the same for the Book of Lecan version. Such vague entries are not that uncommon for the Ban Shenchas, especially in cases where the woman was a member of a more obscure family (which was apparently the case for Carrach Calma's descendants by the time this was written). It is quite possible that the original scribe(s) knew that Gormlaith was a descendant of Carrach Calma, but did not know (or remember) her father's first name. Unfortunately, the Book of Ballymote version breaks off before reaching her entry (in fact, it stops a few entries after the entry for Echrad, frequently mentioned in this thread). The introduction to the edition by Dobbs mentions a couple of other manuscripts containing part of the Ban Shenchas, but the versions in the Books of Ui Maine and Lecan are the longest representatives of the prose version, and the metrical version ends at an earlier period. I have photocopies from the original manuscript of the Book of Ballymote version and from the published facsimiles of the Book of Ui Maine and Book of Lecan version, but I have never seen the other versions. A more modern edition of both the metrical and prose versions appeared in the Masters and Doctoral theses of the late Muireann Ní Bhrolchain, but to my knowledge, the planned published version from Four Courts Press never appeared. It was on the list of books from Four Courts Press in the late 1990's, but when I ordered a copy around 2000, I received a response that the author had not yet delivered the manuscript, and it disappeared from their list soon afterward. Some booksellers (such as Amazon) list the book as out of print (even with an ISBN number!), but I have never heard from anybody who claims to have seen a copy.

The bottom line is that when you are doing genealogy, things are sometimes going to be more complicated than the naive fill-in-the-blanks approach encouraged by the usual genealogy database programs, especially in settings where the evidence is slim. There is always a (perhaps slim) possibility that one of the inadequately explored Irish genealogical manuscripts will produce a nice surprise for us. Meanwhile, however, a "discontuous" line from "Eve" of Leinster to the Uí Néill kings is the best we can do.

Stewart Baldwin
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2018-04-11 15:08:00 UTC
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It is too bad that the theory doesn't hold water, as it would be nice to have a descent of Aife ingen Diarmata ("Eve of Leinster)" from the Ui Neill kings. If one is willing to accept a "discontinuous" descent (i.e., a descent missing one or more generations), then the following line is available.
Amargen Ua Morda (d. 1097), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma.
Loigsech Ua Morda (d. 1149), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide.
Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda, m. Muirchertach Ua Tuathail (d. 1146), king of Ui Muiredaig.
Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail, m. Diarmait Mac Murchada (d. 1171), king of Laigin (Leinster).
Aife ingen Diarmata, m. Richard Strongbow.
Carrach Calma was a nickname of Donnchad (d. 969), a great-grandson of the Ui Neill king Flann Sinna. Gormlaith is called a daughter of Carrach Calma in the Book of Ui Maine version (obviously chronologically impossible) and a daughter of Mac Carraig Calma in the Book of Lecan version. Since surnames were already developing at that time, it is not clear whether "ingen Mac Carraig Calma" means "daughter of a son of Carrach Calma" (chronologically possible, but only if extreme circumstance are assumed) or daughter of a later descendant of Carrach Calma who was using "Mac Carraig Calma" as a surname (much more likely). The only son of Carrach Calma of whom I am aware was Oengus mac Carraig Calma, who died in 1017. There appears to be too little information about the descendants of Carrach Calma to determine the exact line of descent. While not impossible, it would be a stretch to assume that Oengus was the maternal grandfather of a man who died 132 years later after he did.
Stewart Baldwin
To conclude with what this thread ultimately turned out being, a quest to find a descent for Eve of Leinster from Uí Néill kings, the following is presented. While the following line of descent has yet to be completely proven, it is one of the most probable given the prevailing evidence to date for a descent from Uí Néill kings to Eve of Leinster. Some of the generations have already been commented on previously, so we don’t need to rehash over that again. Therefore, before picking apart every single generation, take heed of the where it says “one of the most probable” lines of descent. The spelling of given names and placement of titles have been corrected where needed.

1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara
17. Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma, rigdamna of Tara (d. 1017)
20. Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033)
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
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2018-04-11 16:05:12 UTC
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What is the usefulness to know what line is the most probable to be correct when it is almost certain to be incorrect?

The most probable method ever presented on this list for converting silver to gold is by pouring vinegar on it. Please don't quibble about the details of that statement because no one here has presented a better way and so this Remains the most probable one.
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2018-04-11 16:13:05 UTC
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What is the usefulness to know what line is the most probable to be correct when it is almost certain to be incorrect?
The most probable method ever presented on this list for converting silver to gold is by pouring vinegar on it. Please don't quibble about the details of that statement because no one here has presented a better way and so this Remains the most probable one.
The certainty of it being incorrect is merely an opinion. The utility of the most probable line can be ascertained by the originator of this thread. Many, many, many other theoretical lines of descents have been posted scores of times in this newsgroup. Which, sorry to say, are far from being close to reality, and obviously became topics for discussion and debate.
Peter Stewart
2018-04-12 03:59:57 UTC
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Can someone explain why so many messages are getting deleted in this thread (seven so far), and in a few others recently?

I presume these posts will still be in the sgm archive, but it's disconcerting that somebody feels the need to be a kind of flash-presence in the newsgroup.

Peter Stewart
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2018-04-12 07:00:55 UTC
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Can someone explain why so many messages are getting deleted in
this thread (seven so far), and in a few others recently?
I presume these posts will still be in the sgm archive, but
it's disconcerting that somebody feels the need to be a kind
of flash-presence in the newsgroup.
No. With the gateway to GEN-MEDIEVAL down, Google Groups _is_ the archive to s.g.m, and what Google allows to be deleted will not appear. There are some other partial archives around the net (links below) but they appear no longer to be active. For the time since we lost the gateway, gone from Google Groups is GONE.

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.medieval/
http://www.disnorge.no/slektsforum/viewforum.php?f=2118&sid=0e33a6605df553ac09f4846dfeba621f

(anyone know of any others?)

taf
Peter Stewart
2018-04-12 07:06:35 UTC
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Can someone explain why so many messages are getting deleted in
this thread (seven so far), and in a few others recently?
I presume these posts will still be in the sgm archive, but
it's disconcerting that somebody feels the need to be a kind
of flash-presence in the newsgroup.
No. With the gateway to GEN-MEDIEVAL down, Google Groups _is_ the archive to s.g.m, and what Google allows to be deleted will not appear. There are some other partial archives around the net (links below) but they appear no longer to be active. For the time since we lost the gateway, gone from Google Groups is GONE.
I don't suppose we can be losing much, provided that the only person who can delete posts via Google is the one who made them in the first place - anyone frivolous enough to do this (or silly enough to need to do it) is unlikely to contribute substantially.

Peter Stewart
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2018-04-13 18:39:55 UTC
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To conclude with what this thread ultimately turned out being, a quest to find a descent for Eve of Leinster from Uí Néill kings, the following is presented. While the following line of descent has yet to be completely proven, it is one of the most probable given the prevailing evidence to date for a descent from Uí Néill kings to Eve of Leinster. Some of the generations have already been commented on previously, so we don’t need to rehash over that again. Therefore, before picking apart every single generation, take heed of the where it says “one of the most probable” lines of descent. The spelling of given names and placement of titles have been corrected where needed.
"Rehashing" is sometimes needed when inaccurate statements are made. The old ("That's the way it is. No need to discuss further.") approach may work against the very timid, but that approach is much more likely to annoy someone than to convince them.
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1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
As noted before, these three generations are not only undocumented, depending on late sources, but have suspicious elements.
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4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara
17. Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
There is a break in the documentation here.
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19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma, rigdamna of Tara (d. 1017)
20. Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033)
All that is known is that Gormlaith was likely to have been a descendant of Carrach Calma through UNKNOWN intermediate generations (two or three intermediate generations seems about right, but there is no certainty here). Our knowledge of the obscure branches of the Uí Néill is far from complete. Gormlaith could very well descend from intermediate generations who never got mentioned in the annals or other sources.
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21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
A lot of bad genealogy results from the use of false precision. If you want to give a line of descent that is acceptable at a reasonable level of scholarship, then the "fuzziness" between your generations 18 and 21 needs to be CLEARLY noted, and not concealed.

Stewart Baldwin
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2018-04-13 22:06:24 UTC
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"Rehashing" is sometimes needed when inaccurate statements are made. The old ("That's the way it is. No need to discuss further.") approach may work against the very timid, but that approach is much more likely to annoy someone than to convince them.
Post by d***@aol.com
1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
As noted before, these three generations are not only undocumented, depending on late sources, but have suspicious elements.
Professor Baldwin, my deepest apologies for annoying you on an unmonitored newsgroup. I'm not a member of F.A.S.G. or professing to be an expert in Irish medieval genealogy. Numerous lines of descent were given in the first several posts of this thread which where ALL hypothetical. I clearly noted in the intro of the post you replied to, that the line of descent was only "probable", not 100% historically accurate with intricate precision.

With regard to the first three generations, the Irish medieval historian, Bart Jaski, includes these three generations in his genealogical tables. You have cited Jaski's genealogical tables several times on this newsgroup.

"Bart Jaski's genealogical tables are an excellent source for the main lines of most of the genealogies."

Are his genealogical tables pertaining to the above three generations an error and should be considered unreliable now?
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4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara
17. Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
There is a break in the documentation here.
Post by d***@aol.com
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma, rigdamna of Tara (d. 1017)
20. Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033)
All that is known is that Gormlaith was likely to have been a descendant of Carrach Calma through UNKNOWN intermediate generations (two or three intermediate generations seems about right, but there is no certainty here). Our knowledge of the obscure branches of the Uí Néill is far from complete. Gormlaith could very well descend from intermediate generations who never got mentioned in the annals or other sources.
The statements probably, most likely, and possibly doesn't mean that Gormlaith was descended from Carrach Calma. There very well could have been an error with the entry about Gormlaith in the Book of Lecan where it states, "Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma".
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21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
A lot of bad genealogy results from the use of false precision. If you want to give a line of descent that is acceptable at a reasonable level of scholarship, then the "fuzziness" between your generations 18 and 21 needs to be CLEARLY noted, and not concealed.
Stewart Baldwin
Professor Baldwin, you presented the following lineage earlier in the thread:

"If one is willing to accept a "discontinuous" descent (i.e., a descent missing one or more generations), then the following line is available.

Amargen Ua Morda (d. 1097), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma.
Loigsech Ua Morda (d. 1149), king of Loigsi, m. Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide.
Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda, m. Muirchertach Ua Tuathail (d. 1146), king of Ui Muiredaig.
Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail, m. Diarmait Mac Murchada (d. 1171), king of Laigin (Leinster).
Aife ingen Diarmata, m. Richard Strongbow."


I was merely presenting a discontinuous line of descent, adding in possible candidates for those discontinuous generations, and stating that it was probable. However, I see no reason to accept it now based on the grounds of discontinuity. Perhaps it should be abandoned.

Additionally, there was no attempt to conceal anything. Proposing a "possible" or "probable" line of descent, which was stated in the intro of the post you replied to was hardly any intention to spread malice, discontent, or bad genealogy on this newsgroup. With regard to the "fuzziness", I stated, "While the following line of descent has yet to be completely proven, it is one of the most probable". It should have been obvious, even to the novice genealogist reading the thread, that "has yet to be completely proven" means undocumented. Would a note for generations 18 to 21 been useful? Sure! Thank you for pointing that out.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-24 23:00:57 UTC
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Of course, Stewart is also a good genealogist. I wonder if there are any other sources for the relationship besides the Ban Shenchus.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-24 23:07:06 UTC
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I wonder what the rest of the board would think of this link. Echrad's being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig connects most of us to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Lineage below-

Niall of the Nine Hostages
Conall Gulban
Fergus Cennfota
Setna
Ainmuire mac Sétnai
Áed mac Ainmuirech
Máel Coba mac Áedo
Cellach mac Máele Coba
Cacht ingen Cellaig
Fergal mac Máele Dúin
Niall Frossach
Áed Oirdnide
Máel Dúin mac Áeda
Inderb ingen Máel Dúin
Áed mac Eochocáin
Matudán mac Áeda
Echrad ingen Matudan
r***@gmail.com
2018-03-25 03:10:23 UTC
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I wonder what the rest of the board would think of this link. Echrad's being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig connects most of us to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Lineage below-
Niall of the Nine Hostages
Conall Gulban
Fergus Cennfota
Setna
Ainmuire mac Sétnai
Áed mac Ainmuirech
Máel Coba mac Áedo
Cellach mac Máele Coba
Cacht ingen Cellaig
Fergal mac Máele Dúin
Niall Frossach
Áed Oirdnide
Máel Dúin mac Áeda
Inderb ingen Máel Dúin
Áed mac Eochocáin
Matudán mac Áeda
Echrad ingen Matudan
The pedigree to Echrad is essentially correct, if certainly barebones, the titles and death dates of these men being well known. Please not that Fergal was also of the Ui Niall, This is the line:

1.Fergal
2.Maelduin
3.Maelfithrich
4.Aed "Uaridnach"
5.Domnall "Ilchelgach"
6.Muirchertach
7.Muiredach
8.Eogan
9.Niall "of the Nine Hostages"

You are looking at main lines of the Tir Conaill and Tir Eoghain kings. Again, Bart Jaski's paper gives an outline. F.J. Byrne's "Irish Kings and High-Kings" will provide more details.

But I still do not believe that the garbled entry in Lecan conclusively supports the view that Echrad was the mother of Donnchad of Osraige. Parallel texts in Leinster and Ui Maine do not support this view, and suggest an accidental interpolation. I will, however, as time permits see what may be found in MacFirbjs' massive collection.
r***@gmail.com
2018-03-25 03:21:34 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I wonder what the rest of the board would think of this link. Echrad's being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig connects most of us to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Lineage below-
Niall of the Nine Hostages
Conall Gulban
Fergus Cennfota
Setna
Ainmuire mac Sétnai
Áed mac Ainmuirech
Máel Coba mac Áedo
Cellach mac Máele Coba
Cacht ingen Cellaig
Fergal mac Máele Dúin
Niall Frossach
Áed Oirdnide
Máel Dúin mac Áeda
Inderb ingen Máel Dúin
Áed mac Eochocáin
Matudán mac Áeda
Echrad ingen Matudan
1.Fergal
2.Maelduin
3.Maelfithrich
4.Aed "Uaridnach"
5.Domnall "Ilchelgach"
6.Muirchertach
7.Muiredach
8.Eogan
9.Niall "of the Nine Hostages"
You are looking at main lines of the Tir Conaill and Tir Eoghain kings. Again, Bart Jaski's paper gives an outline. F.J. Byrne's "Irish Kings and High-Kings" will provide more details.
But I still do not believe that the garbled entry in Lecan conclusively supports the view that Echrad was the mother of Donnchad of Osraige. Parallel texts in Leinster and Ui Maine do not support this view, and suggest an accidental interpolation. I will, however, as time permits see what may be found in MacFirbjs' massive collection.
Alas, MacFirbis, who only gives the barebones pedigree of the Osraige kings, has nothing on Donnchadh's mother.
d***@aol.com
2018-03-25 13:24:52 UTC
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I wonder what the rest of the board would think of this link. Echrad's being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig connects most of us to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Lineage below-
Niall of the Nine Hostages
Conall Gulban
Fergus Cennfota
Setna
Ainmuire mac Sétnai
Áed mac Ainmuirech
Máel Coba mac Áedo
Cellach mac Máele Coba
Cacht ingen Cellaig
Fergal mac Máele Dúin
Niall Frossach
Áed Oirdnide
Máel Dúin mac Áeda
Inderb ingen Máel Dúin
Áed mac Eochocáin
Matudán mac Áeda
Echrad ingen Matudan
1.Fergal
2.Maelduin
3.Maelfithrich
4.Aed "Uaridnach"
5.Domnall "Ilchelgach"
6.Muirchertach
7.Muiredach
8.Eogan
9.Niall "of the Nine Hostages"
You are looking at main lines of the Tir Conaill and Tir Eoghain kings. Again, Bart Jaski's paper gives an outline. F.J. Byrne's "Irish Kings and High-Kings" will provide more details.
But I still do not believe that the garbled entry in Lecan conclusively supports the view that Echrad was the mother of Donnchad of Osraige. Parallel texts in Leinster and Ui Maine do not support this view, and suggest an accidental interpolation. I will, however, as time permits see what may be found in MacFirbjs' massive collection.
Alas, MacFirbis, who only gives the barebones pedigree of the Osraige kings, has nothing on Donnchadh's mother.
If the entry in The Book of Lecan which asserts that Echrad was the mother of Donnchad of Osraige is the issue, then the following descent to Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige (d. c. 996) removes that problem all together:

1. Niall Noígíallach “Niall of the Nine Hostages” (d. c. 452)

2. Conall Cremthainne (or Conall Err Breg) (d. c. 480)

3. Fergus Cerrbél mac Conaill (d. c. 525)

4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill (d. c. 565)

5. Colmán (Bec) mac Diarmato (d. c. 587)

6. Suibne mac Colmáin (d. c. 600)

7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni (d. c. 635)

8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conall (died at the Battle of Mag Rath in 637)

9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig (d. c. 689)

10. Murchad mac Diarmato (d. c. 715)

11. Domhnall Midi mac Murchada (d. 20 Nov. 763)

12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill (d. 6 Feb. 797)

13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchad (d. c. 843)

14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid (d. 27 Nov. 862)

15. Maelfebail ingen Máel Sechnail (d. c. 886) = Cearbhaill mac Dúnlainge (d. c. 888)

16. Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d. c. 908)

17. Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige (d. c. 976)

18. Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige (d. c. 996)
r***@gmail.com
2018-03-26 13:54:37 UTC
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Is anything known about the ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig? He is an ancestor of Aoife of Leinster.
I wonder what the rest of the board would think of this link. Echrad's being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig connects most of us to Niall of the Nine Hostages. Lineage below-
Niall of the Nine Hostages
Conall Gulban
Fergus Cennfota
Setna
Ainmuire mac Sétnai
Áed mac Ainmuirech
Máel Coba mac Áedo
Cellach mac Máele Coba
Cacht ingen Cellaig
Fergal mac Máele Dúin
Niall Frossach
Áed Oirdnide
Máel Dúin mac Áeda
Inderb ingen Máel Dúin
Áed mac Eochocáin
Matudán mac Áeda
Echrad ingen Matudan
1.Fergal
2.Maelduin
3.Maelfithrich
4.Aed "Uaridnach"
5.Domnall "Ilchelgach"
6.Muirchertach
7.Muiredach
8.Eogan
9.Niall "of the Nine Hostages"
You are looking at main lines of the Tir Conaill and Tir Eoghain kings. Again, Bart Jaski's paper gives an outline. F.J. Byrne's "Irish Kings and High-Kings" will provide more details.
But I still do not believe that the garbled entry in Lecan conclusively supports the view that Echrad was the mother of Donnchad of Osraige. Parallel texts in Leinster and Ui Maine do not support this view, and suggest an accidental interpolation. I will, however, as time permits see what may be found in MacFirbjs' massive collection.
Alas, MacFirbis, who only gives the barebones pedigree of the Osraige kings, has nothing on Donnchadh's mother.
1. Niall Noígíallach “Niall of the Nine Hostages” (d. c. 452)
2. Conall Cremthainne (or Conall Err Breg) (d. c. 480)
3. Fergus Cerrbél mac Conaill (d. c. 525)
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill (d. c. 565)
5. Colmán (Bec) mac Diarmato (d. c. 587)
6. Suibne mac Colmáin (d. c. 600)
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni (d. c. 635)
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conall (died at the Battle of Mag Rath in 637)
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig (d. c. 689)
10. Murchad mac Diarmato (d. c. 715)
11. Domhnall Midi mac Murchada (d. 20 Nov. 763)
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill (d. 6 Feb. 797)
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchad (d. c. 843)
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid (d. 27 Nov. 862)
15. Maelfebail ingen Máel Sechnail (d. c. 886) = Cearbhaill mac Dúnlainge (d. c. 888)
16. Cellach mac Cerbaill, King of Osraige (d. c. 908)
17. Donnchad mac Cellaig, King of Osraige (d. c. 976)
18. Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige (d. c. 996)
Margaret Dobbs' edition of the Bhanshenchus, Revue Celtique, XLVIII, 187, show Ailbi (same ancestry as above) as the mother of Diarmait the son of Cerball and of a king of Connachta (Connaught). In this text, when a particular child or children is/are named, we are safe in assuming that other children of a particular father are by one or more different mothers.
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2018-03-29 22:21:47 UTC
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Margaret Dobbs' edition of the Bhanshenchus, Revue Celtique, XLVIII, 187, show Ailbi (same ancestry as above) as the mother of Diarmait the son of Cerball and of a king of Connachta (Connaught). In this text, when a particular child or children is/are named, we are safe in assuming that other children of a particular father are by one or more different mothers.
While I think that this would usually be the case, I'm not sure that we should go quite so far as stating that we are "safe in assuming" this. It could just mean that the child/children named was/were the only one(s) of interest to the scribe, or that the scribe did not know who the mothers of the other children were, and was exercising due caution. What is really important is that we never safe in assuming the opposite.

Divorce and remarriage (by both men and women) was so common among the early medieval Irish aristocracy that it is likely on statistical grounds alone that a significant majority of Irish kings who left issue did so by more than one mother. So, to me, the main principle ought to be something like the following.

"Even if only one wife of an early medieval Irish king is known, it is never appropriate to conclude that she was the mother of all of his known children, unless the early sources give clear evidence that this was the case."

Of course, similar versions of this warning are valid in other settings, but it is especially important in societies where divorce and remarriage (or unrecorded bigamy or illegitimacy) were common.

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-03-26 02:07:30 UTC
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There are two problems that I know of with the new lineage provided.

1. I am unaware of any evidence that Maelfebail was the mother of Cellach mac Cerbaill. Most Irish Kings had many wives, so it is generally not a good idea to presume one specific wife was the mother of one of the King's sons without explicit evidence. There may be evidence for Cellach's maternity, but I'm unaware of it.

2. While it is the traditional genealogy, it seems Diarmait mac Cerbaill's descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally rejected. From Wikipedia: "As for the reality, Byrne says: Diarmait's immediate origins are obscure and may arouse some suspicion. He notes that Adomnán calls Diarmait filius Cerbulis, son of Cerball, and not son of Fergus as the genealogies would have it. The same applies to other hagiographical materials, which again have Diarmait as the son of an otherwise unknown Cerball. Also likely to raise suspicion that Diarmait's genealogy is a later fiction, is the fact that unlike the majority of the Uí Néill, who traced their descent from, and were named for, sons of Niall, Diarmait's descendants were named for his sons.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-26 02:10:06 UTC
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While the Book of Lecan seems to be the only source for Donnchad's maternity, that does not automatically mean it is incorrect. Luke Stevens seemed to raise some good arguments in favor of the interpolation's truthfullness.
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2018-03-26 02:49:20 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
While the Book of Lecan seems to be the only source for Donnchad's maternity, that does not automatically mean it is incorrect. Luke Stevens seemed to raise some good arguments in favor of the interpolation's truthfullness.
It also doesn't mean that The Book of Lecan's entry for Donnchad's maternity is correct, either. Although, you could call it the "traditional genealogy!"

I"m curious if you have any evidence for the other wives of Cellach mac Cerbaill, besides the daughter of Máel Sechlainn?

You initiated this thread requesting an ascent for "Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada (d. 996), son of Donnchad mac Cellaig." Please provide the ascent for Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, that you are looking for?! Gens 4 though 18 are generally accepted. Stewart Baldwin even includes a daughter of Máel Sechlainn as the mother of Cellach mac Cerbaill in his genealogical tables. There are other discussions in the SGM archives dating back to 1998 on this topic. I'm sure you can find them.

Cheers
HWinnSadler
2018-03-26 03:35:38 UTC
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I am not saying it is a fact that Echrad ingen Matudan was truly the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, only that there are arguments for and against the position.

I know of no other wives of Cellach mac Cerbaill. However, that doesn't automatically mean she is the mother of all of his children.

I started the thread looking for any information on his ancestors. Stewart Baldwin is very respectable, if he accepts the descent, it very likely is true. I will definitely look for those threads. Thank you for mentioning them.
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2018-03-26 13:20:57 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I am not saying it is a fact that Echrad ingen Matudan was truly the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, only that there are arguments for and against the position.
As mentioned earlier, the best counter-argument given to the strongest objection of Echrad ingen Matudan being the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig is below:

“My whole point is that the Lecan scribe learned of another child of Echrad by a different husband and included this information. There are plenty of other cases of this happening in both prose versions, and the Lecan entry is not even worded in the same way . . . While this series of largely unmotivated little changes may be at least possible, it seems to me like grasping at straws. The much simpler and more plausible explanation, which convincingly addresses all but the last of these in one fell swoop, is that the Lecan scribe learned that Echrad was also the mother of Donnchad, and the error arose as the sentence so stating was rearranged and transcribed, as I said before.” END OF QUOTE
Post by HWinnSadler
I know of no other wives of Cellach mac Cerbaill. However, that doesn't automatically mean she is the mother of all of his children.
There are many opposing arguments someone can make to discount the validity of the wives or mothers of some of these semi-historical Irish kings.

We find in ‘An Banshenchas’ the following:

"The mother of Diarmait son of Cerball, hero of the brilliant Ossorians, and of Tadg son of perfect Concobar (noble, wealthy, destructive and impetuous) was the daughter in of brown poetical Mael Sechlaind of the main-line of famous Mael Ruanaid.” END OF QUOTE.

This would give us good indication that the daughter of Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid was not only the mother of Darmait mac Cerbaill, but also the mother of Darmait’s brother, Cellach mac Cerbaill.
Post by HWinnSadler
I started the thread looking for any information on his ancestors. Stewart Baldwin is very respectable, if he accepts the descent, it very likely is true. I will definitely look for those threads. Thank you for mentioning them.
You stated earlier, “While the Book of Lecan seems to be the only source for Donnchad's maternity, that does not automatically mean it is incorrect. Luke Stevens seemed to raise some good arguments in favor of the interpolation's truthfullness.”

Then it must be pointed out, that the argument objecting to Donnchad’s maternity as asserted to in 'The Book of Lecan' requires a greater leap of faith than the argument supporting the interpolation’s truthfulness.
HWinnSadler
2018-03-27 00:04:12 UTC
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Even if Cellach mac Cerbaill's mother was Maelfelbha, there is still the problem of Diarmait mac Cerbaill- he was not the great grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages as the genealogists claimed.
d***@aol.com
2018-03-27 00:51:19 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Even if Cellach mac Cerbaill's mother was Maelfelbha, there is still the problem of Diarmait mac Cerbaill- he was not the great grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages as the genealogists claimed.
In Edel Bhreathnach’s, 'Níell cáich úa Néill nasctar géill: The Political Context of Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig', Edel Bhreathnach (ed.) The Kingship and Landscape of Tara 57:

Bhreathnach has provided a possible alternative reading of Díarmait's background. She has highlighted the links between Díarmait and his family with the north-east and suggests that they may have “originally belonged to a north-eastern or north-midlands people and that they were involved in a realignment which caused them to emerge ultimately as part of the Uí Néill.” Bhreathnach concedes this theory “is somewhat difficult to substantiate owing to the absence of direct evidence.”

Per Wikipedia: “As for the reality, Byrne says: ‘Diarmait's immediate origins are obscure and may arouse some suspicion.’ He notes that Adomnán calls Diarmait filius Cerbulis, son of Cerball, and not son of Fergus as the genealogies would have it. The same applies to other hagiographical materials, which again have Diarmait as the son of an otherwise unknown Cerball. Also likely to raise suspicion that Diarmait's genealogy is a later fiction, is the fact that unlike the majority of the Uí Néill, who traced their descent from, and were named for, sons of Niall, Diarmait's descendants were named for his sons.”

A plausible answer to Byrne’s and Adomnán’s suspicion can be found in Ailbhe Mac Shamhráin, 'Nebulae discutiuntur? The emergence of Clann Cholmáin, sixth-eighth centuries', in, Seanchas: Studies in Early and Medieval Irish Archaeology, History and Literature in Honour of Francis J. Byrne, Alfred P. Smyth (ed), (Dublin 2000) 95:

“If there was just one Conall son of Níall, it would suggest that Díarmait mac Cerbaill was a close cousin of Columba providing a 'convenient explanation for the naming of Díarmait's son as Colmán (Columbán).”

In Ailbhe Mac Shamhráin & Paul Byrne, 'Prosopography I', 17:

“Clann Cholmáin specifically, the dynasty traced itself back through Colmán Már (d.557), Díarmait mac Cerbaill (d.565) and eventually to Conall Cremthanne (d.480) son of Níall Noígíallach (d. ?).”

The suspicions asserting that Díarmait mac Cerbaill was not a member of the Uí Néill dynasty lacks the direct evidence to be regarded as historical fact.
d***@aol.com
2018-03-27 02:00:35 UTC
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The Book of Lecan, i.e., MS 23 P 2:
Also see: Kathleen Mulchrone, The Book of Lecan: Leabhar Mór Mhic Fhir Bhisigh Leacain (Dublin, 1937) p. 456.

“Diarmaid m Domnaill m Murchaid m Domnaill m Fhloind m Mailechlainn m Domnaill m
Dondchada m Fhloind Shinda m Mailechainn m Mailruanaid m Dondchada m Domnaill m Murchada Midi m Diarmada m Airmedaich m Conaill Guthbind m Shuibne m Colmain Moir m Diarmada Derc [Díarmait mac Cerbaill] m Fhergusa Ceirrbeoil m Conaill Cremthaind m Neill Naigiallaig [Niall of the Nine Hostages].”

The Clann Cholmáin genealogy:

H.2.7 (1298)
Gednelach Clainne Colmain

Conchobor
Máel Sechnaill
Conchobor
Domnall
Máel Sechnaill
Domnall
Donnchad
Flann Sinna
Máel Sechnaill
Máel Rúanaid
Donnchad
Domnall
Murchad
Diarmait
Airmedach Cáech
Conall Guthbind
Suibne
- - -
Colmán Mór
Diarmait
Fergus Cerrbél
Conall Cremthainne
Niall Noígiallach
s***@mindspring.com
2018-03-29 21:33:25 UTC
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...
The suspicions asserting that Díarmait mac Cerbaill was not a member of the Uí Néill dynasty lacks the direct evidence to be regarded as historical fact.
You have it completely backwards. A more accurate statement would be:

"The assertion that Díarmait mac Cerbaill WAS a member of the Uí Néill dynasty lacks the direct evidence to be regarded as historical fact."

Contemporary (or near contemporary) evidence is slim for Diarmait and nonexistent for his alleged ancestors (other than the name of his father). On the other hand, the reasons for suspicion are very real. The supposed name of Fergus Cerball given to his father by the genealogies that the (reasonably well-documented) patronymic giving his father as Cerball was contradicted by an alternate version giving his father's name as Fergus. This is reminiscent of the atrocious practice of many modern amateur genealogists who, when they see the father of William Smith given as John Smith in one record and as Robert Smith in another, will "smooth over" the contradiction by giving the father's name as John Robert Smith, rather than doing actual research to determine which one (if either) is correct.

It is still possible that Diarmait was a descendant of Niall, but there is not enough surviving evidence to prove that with any degree of confidence. The earliest well documented ancestor of this particular line is Diarmait himself, or his father Cerball if you are willing to accept him as an individual about whom nothing is known other than his name.

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-03-29 22:45:49 UTC
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Thank you Stewart, for pointing out the various flaws here. I will not be including Echrad in my database.
HWinnSadler
2018-04-01 17:55:35 UTC
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I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?

Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-02 01:33:02 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?
Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
I don't see how a line for which "there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links" bypasses difficulties. Flann Sinna's daughter Gormlaith was married to (among others) Cormac, king of Munster, a completely different person from the father of Fáelán. After a brief search on the Internet, the only sites I found giving Flann Sinna as the maternal grandmother of Fáelán mac Cormaic were various junk genealogy sites like Geni. So, it looks like somebody carelessly identified the two Cormacs, followed by the usual copying frenzy by those who will believe anything they read as long as they like what it says.

As bad as the typical Internet genealogy website is, most websites on medieval genealogy are worse, and most on EARLY medieval genealogy are even more unreliable. For the most part, it is a waste of time to dredge through undocumented sites on early Irish genealogy on the outside chance that there will be something worthwhile there.

Stewart Baldwin
r***@gmail.com
2018-04-02 02:59:56 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?
Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
I don't see how a line for which "there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links" bypasses difficulties. Flann Sinna's daughter Gormlaith was married to (among others) Cormac, king of Munster, a completely different person from the father of Fáelán. After a brief search on the Internet, the only sites I found giving Flann Sinna as the maternal grandmother of Fáelán mac Cormaic were various junk genealogy sites like Geni. So, it looks like somebody carelessly identified the two Cormacs, followed by the usual copying frenzy by those who will believe anything they read as long as they like what it says.
As bad as the typical Internet genealogy website is, most websites on medieval genealogy are worse, and most on EARLY medieval genealogy are even more unreliable. For the most part, it is a waste of time to dredge through undocumented sites on early Irish genealogy on the outside chance that there will be something worthwhile there.
Stewart Baldwin
A question for Stewart Baldwin:

HWinnSadler gives Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig, as the mother of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige, which is what you give in “Kings of Osraige”. In your “Eve of Leinster and Radnaillt of Dublin” posting from the 1990s, you noted:

“The Osraige pedigree shows two men named Gilla Patraic, grandfather and grandson, who were both sons of a Donnchad, and the Ban Shenchus shows two marriages of a Donnchad of Osraige which produced a son named Gilla Patraic, but it is not clear which marriage belongs to which Donnchad [BS 189, 228]. I tend to agree with Kelley's suggestion that the wife of Donnchad (#488) was Aife, sister of Domnall mac Faelain of Deisi Muman (#820), but the identification is not certain.”

Do you now feel that the identification is reasonably certain?

Roderick Ward
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-02 22:51:13 UTC
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Post by s***@mindspring.com
Post by HWinnSadler
I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?
Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
I don't see how a line for which "there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links" bypasses difficulties. Flann Sinna's daughter Gormlaith was married to (among others) Cormac, king of Munster, a completely different person from the father of Fáelán. After a brief search on the Internet, the only sites I found giving Flann Sinna as the maternal grandmother of Fáelán mac Cormaic were various junk genealogy sites like Geni. So, it looks like somebody carelessly identified the two Cormacs, followed by the usual copying frenzy by those who will believe anything they read as long as they like what it says.
As bad as the typical Internet genealogy website is, most websites on medieval genealogy are worse, and most on EARLY medieval genealogy are even more unreliable. For the most part, it is a waste of time to dredge through undocumented sites on early Irish genealogy on the outside chance that there will be something worthwhile there.
Stewart Baldwin
“The Osraige pedigree shows two men named Gilla Patraic, grandfather and grandson, who were both sons of a Donnchad, and the Ban Shenchus shows two marriages of a Donnchad of Osraige which produced a son named Gilla Patraic, but it is not clear which marriage belongs to which Donnchad [BS 189, 228]. I tend to agree with Kelley's suggestion that the wife of Donnchad (#488) was Aife, sister of Domnall mac Faelain of Deisi Muman (#820), but the identification is not certain.”
Do you now feel that the identification is reasonably certain?
Roderick Ward
Yes, I would now consider it as reasonably certain, or at least as certain as you could expect with such difficult sources. At the time I wrote my ancestor table of Aife (Eve), I was not looking that closely at those who were not her ancestors. However, the Ban Senchus entries for Doirenn (a woman of vague ancestry who was mother of the other Gilla patraic mac Donnchada), states that her son Gilla Patraic was king of Laigin [Book of Lecan version] and that her son Gilla Patraic was the father of Domnall mac Gilla Patraic. Both of these statements fit well with the Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada who died in 1055, but not with his grandfather Gilla Patraic mac Donnchada (d. 996). This means that Aife ingen Fáeláin of the Deisi was not the mother of the later Gilla Patraic, which leaves her (by process of elimination) as the mother of the earlier Gilla Patraic (which also fits the chronology better). Not the most solid evidence in the world, but I think it is good enough.

By the way, there is also an alternate descent of "Eve" of Leinster from this Deisi dynasty (see ancestor #401 in the Eve of Leinster table).

Stewart Baldwin
d***@aol.com
2018-04-02 13:55:41 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?
Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
For those of you who are still trying to scrounge up a valid descent for Aoife of Leinster from Ui Neill kings, then the following line from Flann Sinna is the best available without using junk genealogy sites. It does, however, assume that descendants of Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017) took the surname Mac Carriag Calma (which is the most likely scenario), and that the circa dates of death for Oengus’ son and Gormlaith are chronologically acceptable despite the lack of additional evidence.

According to the Book of Lecan: “Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma dicloind Cholmain Moir, mathair Laigsich (ob. 1149?) m. Aimirgin rig Laigsi”. So, we can be quite certain that Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma was a descendant of Colmán Már (d. 555/558).

The line is as follows:

1. Flann Sinna, King of Mide, High King of Ireland (d. 916)
2. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann (d. 915)
3. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach (d. ? )
4. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
5. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
6. mac Mac Carriag Calma (d. c. 1070)
7. Gormlaith ingen mac Mac Carraig Calma (d. c. 1110) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of
Loigsi (d. 1097)
8. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
9. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d.
1146)
10. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin
(Leinster) (d. 1171)
11. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
d***@aol.com
2018-04-02 14:06:40 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I have come across another possible line to Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland (descendant of Diarmait mac Cerbaill) that seems to bypass some of the difficulties of the provided line, but there doesn't seem to be any sources for a few links. Can someone take a look?
Flann Sinna, High King of Ireland
Gormlaith ingen Flann Sinna
Fáelán mac Cormaic, king of the Déisi
Aife ingen Fáeláin, wife of Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
For those of you who are still trying to scrounge up a valid descent for Aoife of Leinster from Ui Neill kings, then the following line from Flann Sinna is the best available without using junk genealogy sites. It does, however, assume that descendants of Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017) took the surname Mac Carriag Calma (which is the most likely scenario), and that the circa dates of death for Oengus’ son and Gormlaith are chronologically acceptable despite the lack of additional evidence.

According to the Book of Lecan: “Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma dicloind Cholmain Moir, mathair Laigsich (ob. 1149?) m. Aimirgin rig Laigsi”. So, we can be quite certain that Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma was a descendant of Colmán Már (d. 555/558).

The line is as follows:

1. Flann Sinna, King of Mide, High King of Ireland (d. 916)
2. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann (d. 915)
3. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach (d. ? )
4. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
5. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
6. mac Mac Carriag Calma (d. c. 1070)
7. Gormlaith ingen mac Mac Carraig Calma (d. c. 1110) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
8. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
9. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
10. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
11. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
HWinnSadler
2018-04-02 21:46:32 UTC
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The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
Paulo Canedo
2018-04-02 21:59:22 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
It should be noted however that the Y DNA of Diarmait's descendants matches with Niall's son Eoghan's descendants. They are both R1b-M222. This suggests there might have been some sort of descent.
Paulo Canedo
2018-04-02 22:00:21 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
It should be noted, however, that the Y DNA of Diarmait's descendants matches with the one of Niall's son Eoghan's descendants. They are both R1b-M222. This suggests there might have been some sort of descent.
taf
2018-04-02 22:48:35 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by HWinnSadler
The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
It should be noted, however, that the Y DNA of Diarmait's descendants matches with the one of Niall's son Eoghan's descendants. They are both R1b-M222. This suggests there might have been some sort of descent.
R1b is among the most common types in Western Europe. This just means that they were both descended from the people who spread Indo-European languages to the continent. Given that those people were thought to have formed an elite over-lord class, the fact that two hereditary Irish tribal leaders would both be R1b is hardly surprising but hardly suggestive of a close relationship. It means nothing on a genealogical level, other than enabling the exclusion of male-line kinship with non-matching lines. You need a lot more precise typing to determine if they were related in a genealogical time frame. (And this is predicated on the accuracy of the claimed pedigrees of the people tested - if the 'descendant of Eoghan' simply claimed this because that is what O'Hart wrote about his surname, it is worthless. Also there needs to have been enough branches tested to exclude Will's bugaboo, that this just results from a descendant of Diarmait getting his leg over with the wife of a Eoghan descendant, or vice versa.)

taf
Paulo Canedo
2018-04-03 18:40:24 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by HWinnSadler
The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
It should be noted, however, that the Y DNA of Diarmait's descendants matches with the one of Niall's son Eoghan's descendants. They are both R1b-M222. This suggests there might have been some sort of descent.
R1b is among the most common types in Western Europe. This just means that they were both descended from the people who spread Indo-European languages to the continent. Given that those people were thought to have formed an elite over-lord class, the fact that two hereditary Irish tribal leaders would both be R1b is hardly surprising but hardly suggestive of a close relationship. It means nothing on a genealogical level, other than enabling the exclusion of male-line kinship with non-matching lines. You need a lot more precise typing to determine if they were related in a genealogical time frame. (And this is predicated on the accuracy of the claimed pedigrees of the people tested - if the 'descendant of Eoghan' simply claimed this because that is what O'Hart wrote about his surname, it is worthless. Also there needs to have been enough branches tested to exclude Will's bugaboo, that this just results from a descendant of Diarmait getting his leg over with the wife of a Eoghan descendant, or vice versa.)
taf
Yes, but R1b-M222 is already a deep subclade haplpogroup, that has been associated to Niall's descendants, by the study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380239.
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-03 23:12:29 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
...
Yes, but R1b-M222 is already a deep subclade haplpogroup, that has been associated to Niall's descendants, by the study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380239.
You are overstating what that study claimed, which in turn overstated its own conclusions. What the study really showed was that numerous members of the group R1b-M222 possessed the same surnames as certain medieval individuals who were members of dynasties claiming descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages, although the conclusions were certainly stated in such a way as to invite the misinterpretations of this study that have appeared so widely in the media. There was no significant genealogical evidence given in the article. The two following articles by well known historians have criticized the conclusions.

Bart Jaski, Medieval Irish genealogies and genetics, in Duffy (ed.),
Princes, prelates and poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of
Katherine Simms (2013), 3-17.

Catherine Swift, Interlaced scholarship: genealogies and genetics in
twenty-first century Ireland, in Duffy (ed.), Princes, prelates and
poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of Katharine Simms (2013),
18–31.

Stewart Baldwin
taf
2018-04-04 00:19:28 UTC
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Post by s***@mindspring.com
You are overstating what that study claimed, which in turn overstated its
own conclusions. What the study really showed was that numerous members
of the group R1b-M222 possessed the same surnames as certain medieval
individuals who were members of dynasties claiming descent from Niall of
the Nine Hostages, although the conclusions were certainly stated in such
a way as to invite the misinterpretations of this study that have appeared
so widely in the media. There was no significant genealogical evidence
given in the article. The two following articles by well known historians
have criticized the conclusions.
Just as a second datapoint, there are similar problems with the Genghis Khan haplotype - they just found an incredibly common haplotype and decided Genghis was the most likely person to have had a lot of male-line descendants. They recently tested some burials that are thought to have belonged to his family members, and their Y type did not match the 'Genghis' haplotype.

The take-home here is that you really need to critically evaluate the conclusions of these papers and recognize them for what the do, and do not, really demonstrate.

taf
Paulo Canedo
2018-04-05 15:47:02 UTC
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Post by taf
Post by s***@mindspring.com
You are overstating what that study claimed, which in turn overstated its
own conclusions. What the study really showed was that numerous members
of the group R1b-M222 possessed the same surnames as certain medieval
individuals who were members of dynasties claiming descent from Niall of
the Nine Hostages, although the conclusions were certainly stated in such
a way as to invite the misinterpretations of this study that have appeared
so widely in the media. There was no significant genealogical evidence
given in the article. The two following articles by well known historians
have criticized the conclusions.
Just as a second datapoint, there are similar problems with the Genghis Khan haplotype - they just found an incredibly common haplotype and decided Genghis was the most likely person to have had a lot of male-line descendants. They recently tested some burials that are thought to have belonged to his family members, and their Y type did not match the 'Genghis' haplotype.
The take-home here is that you really need to critically evaluate the conclusions of these papers and recognize them for what the do, and do not, really demonstrate.
taf
The Genghis Khan case is described in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_Genghis_Khan. In short, Y DNA tests in modern asian men suggest they have a common ancestor about 1000 years ago in Mongolia and thus, and due to the stories of the several wifes, concubine and lovers of the mongol rulers, the researchers suggested the haplogroup C-M217 for Genghis Khan and his clan/tribe. Then some mongolian tombs were tested that suggest the R1b haplogorup for Genghis Khan, however it is unknown whether those tombs were of Genghis's clan/tribe or of some other central asian clan/tribe.
taf
2018-04-04 00:12:26 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Yes, but R1b-M222 is already a deep subclade haplpogroup, that has been
associated to Niall's descendants, by the study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380239.
Deep, meaning that it traces way back in time, as in 1000s of years BC deep. And even were we to ignore Stewart's warnings that these results have been seriously over-interpreted, you are still drawing a conclusion that there must be some special significance to the fact (if that's what it is) that two sets of families both have the most common haplogroup in Europe. Yeah, it means they could be related, but it is hardly a strong argument that they are (within a genealogical time-frame).

taf
Paulo Canedo
2018-04-05 15:26:03 UTC
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Post by taf
Post by Paulo Canedo
Yes, but R1b-M222 is already a deep subclade haplpogroup, that has been
associated to Niall's descendants, by the study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380239.
Deep, meaning that it traces way back in time, as in 1000s of years BC deep. And even were we to ignore Stewart's warnings that these results have been seriously over-interpreted, you are still drawing a conclusion that there must be some special significance to the fact (if that's what it is) that two sets of families both have the most common haplogroup in Europe. Yeah, it means they could be related, but it is hardly a strong argument that they are (within a genealogical time-frame).
taf
Sorry for my very little knowledge in genetics, but I thought deep clade meant it was a clade already well below in the tree.
d***@aol.com
2018-04-02 22:46:37 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
The descent from Flann Sinna would merely provide Diarmait mac Cerbaill as an ancestor. As stated earlier, his descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages is generally doubted, especially because of his patronymic.
Then you are essentially removing two of the most important dynasties from the Southern Uí Néill branch, Síl nÁedo Sláine, the kings of Brega, and Clann Cholmáin, kings of Mide!

This notion of suspicion was mentioned by Byrne in his work, Irish kings and high-kings. Regardless, Professor Byrne concluded that Diarmait mac Cerbaill was a member of the Southern Uí Néill branch and included Diarmait as such in his Genealogical Tables.

If you want the exact quote from Byrne, he states:

“Diarmait's immediate origins are obscure and may arouse some suspicion. In spite of his patronymic (latinised by Adomnán as filius Cerbulis) the genealogical tradition says that his father's name was Fergus, nicknamed Cerrbél or 'crooked mouth'. His grandfather Conall son of Niall was nicknamed Cremthainne (possibly denoting fosterage among the Uí Chremthainn of Airgialla), to distinguish him from his brother Conall Gulban, ancestor of the Cenél Conaill. The habit of giving the same name to different sons remained common among the prolific Irish princes until the sixteenth century.”

Professor F.J. Byrne includes Diarmait mac Cerbaill and his descendants as members of the Uí Néill, specifically the Southern Uí Néill branch.

See:

Byrne, F.J., Irish kings and high-kings. 2nd ed. (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001): pp. 280-282 [Appendix II, Table 1 (Connachta and Uí Néill) & Table 3 (High-Kings of Clann Cholmáin)].

Bhreathnach (Edel) (ed.): The kingship and landscape of Tara. ed. Edel Bhreathnach, (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005): pp. 344-345 [Table 3 (Clann Cholmáin)].
HWinnSadler
2018-04-02 23:18:12 UTC
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Stewart, is the Eve of Leinster table available somewhere?
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-04 15:16:57 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Stewart, is the Eve of Leinster table available somewhere?
Check the Google Groups archives at the URL

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/soc.genealogy.medieval/dmggM76nz2I/xj5Z2pFGoaEJ

[Combine this as one line if it gets split.]

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-04-02 23:44:34 UTC
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If one accepts Diarmait mac Cerbaill as a great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, there seems to be no problem connecting Eve of Leinster to Niall of the Nine Hostages, and to the traditional genealogy of the High Kings from him. Here's one possible lineage from Diarmait to Aoife-

Diarmait mac Cerbaill
Colmán Már mac Diarmato
Suibne mac Colmáin
Conall Guthbinn, King of Uisnech
Airmetach Cáech
Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
Murchad Midi
Domnall Midi
Donnchad Midi and Bé Fáil ingen Cathail
Máel Ruanaid
Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid, High King of Ireland
Ailbe ingen Máel Sechnaill and Cerball mac Dúngaile
Cellach mac Cerbaill (possibly Ailbe's son)
Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
And so on.
d***@aol.com
2018-04-03 00:19:47 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
If one accepts Diarmait mac Cerbaill as a great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, there seems to be no problem connecting Eve of Leinster to Niall of the Nine Hostages, and to the traditional genealogy of the High Kings from him. Here's one possible lineage from Diarmait to Aoife-
Diarmait mac Cerbaill
Colmán Már mac Diarmato
Suibne mac Colmáin
Conall Guthbinn, King of Uisnech
Airmetach Cáech
Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
Murchad Midi
Domnall Midi
Donnchad Midi and Bé Fáil ingen Cathail
Máel Ruanaid
Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid, High King of Ireland
Ailbe ingen Máel Sechnaill and Cerball mac Dúngaile
Cellach mac Cerbaill (possibly Ailbe's son)
Donnchad mac Cellaig
Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige
And so on.
Stewart Baldwin does show Cellach mac Cerbaill (d. 908) as the son of Cerball mac Dúnlainge (d. 888) and his 1st (and possibly only) wife, Ailbe ingen Máel Sechnaill in Table 2: Kings of Osraige, 790-1003. Although, I could be interpreting the table wrong.

Loading Image...
HWinnSadler
2018-04-03 00:29:14 UTC
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The table only seems to show her as the mother of Diarmait. It is probable that she was only the mother of Diarmait as that is what the sources seem to show.
d***@aol.com
2018-04-03 00:40:52 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
The table only seems to show her as the mother of Diarmait. It is probable that she was only the mother of Diarmait as that is what the sources seem to show.
Then you can interpret the table as saying Cerball mac Dúnlainge (d. 888) had only one son (Diarmait) by his known wife, Ailbe ingen Máel Sechnaill.

In which case, your line breaks at this generation:

Cellach mac Cerbaill (possibly Ailbe's son)
HWinnSadler
2018-04-03 00:43:42 UTC
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Probably, yes. And since the descent from Flann Sinna seems only tentative, it seems that there are no descents from Niall of the Nine Hostages to Eve of Leinster that stand up to any kind of scrutiny.
d***@aol.com
2018-04-03 01:03:52 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
Probably, yes. And since the descent from Flann Sinna seems only tentative, it seems that there are no descents from Niall of the Nine Hostages to Eve of Leinster that stand up to any kind of scrutiny.
Absolutely, yes. Especially for the lines of descent you're proposing from Niall to Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige.
HWinnSadler
2018-04-03 01:53:19 UTC
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The main problem is the Irish sources often don't name the mother. Another possible descent from Niall would connect to Llewelyn ap Iorweth. That would rely on Eithne ingen Domnall Midi being the mother of Muiredach mac Brain (died 818), King of Leinster.
d***@aol.com
2018-04-03 18:06:22 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
The main problem is the Irish sources often don't name the mother. Another possible descent from Niall would connect to Llewelyn ap Iorweth. That would rely on Eithne ingen Domnall Midi being the mother of Muiredach mac Brain (died 818), King of Leinster.
To HWinnSadler:

This thread is titled, “Ancestry of Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige”, which eventually evolved into a search for a descent from the legendary king, Niall of the Nine Hostages. Is there a descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages to Gilla Pátraic? Probably not! Regardless of the level of scrutiny that is applied to each generation. However, as previously mentioned in a post by Stewart Baldwin, which you seem to have skipped over, he presented a discontinuous line that is available. Now, the discontinuity in the line (which would account for at most two generations but most likely only one), doesn’t automatically mean the line is invalid. With that said, you will not find a valid line of descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages to Gilla Pátraic mac Donnchada, King of Osraige. The following line which doesn’t pass through Gilla Pátraic is available with references added to validate the discontinuous part of the descent.

The line is as follows:

1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann
17. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
|
20. Descends from Mac Carraig Calma
|
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma (daughter of a descendant of Carrach Calma) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin(Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow

References for Generations 18 to 21:

Dobbs, Margaret E. (ed. and tr.), “The Banshenchus [part 2]”, Revue Celtique, Vol. 48, (1931): p. 198 (author states, “Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma dicloind Cholmain Moir, mathair Laigsich (ob. 1149?) m. Aimirgin rig Laigsi.”).

Dobbs, Margaret E. (ed. and tr.), “The Banshenchus [part 2]”, Revue Celtique, Vol. 48, (1931): p. 230 (author states, “Gormlaith ingen Carrai Calma, mathair Laisig (ob. 1149) m. Amargéin hUi Morda rig Laigen.”).

O’Hart, John. Irish Pedigrees. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. xxi (author states, “With reference to the origin of sirnames in Ireland it may be mentioned that, in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe [Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a particular sirname (or sire-name); the more correctly to preserve the history and genealogy of the different Irish tribes. Each family was at liberty to adopt a sirname from some particular ancestor, and, generally, took their names from some chief of their tribe who was celebrated for his valour, wisdom, piety, or some other great qualities. And the members of a family, each in addition to his own proper name, took, as a common designation, the name of their father, or their grandfather, or of some more remote ancestor.”).

O’Hart, John. Irish Pedigrees. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. 36 (author states, “Mac, the son or ‘descendant of’; …”).

A New History of Ireland: Volume IX: Maps, Genealogies, Lists: A Companion to Irish History, Part 2. Moody, T.W., et al., editors. (Clarendon Press, 1984): Table 4.
HWinnSadler
2018-04-04 01:08:12 UTC
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If one was to accept Echrad ingen Matudan as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, there would be a descent from Niall to Gilla Patraic. It's not a universally accepted one, of course, and it has been already discussed. That would count under the title of this thread- ancestors of Gilla Patraic. I did not skip over the lineage presented by Baldwin, as I questioned whether it could be accepted because of the doubt surrounding Diarmait mac Cerbaill. I never questioned the actual line presented, at least back to Diarmait mac Cerbaill- because it seems probable. Confusing, but probable.
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-04 17:17:11 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
If one was to accept Echrad ingen Matudan as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, there would be a descent from Niall to Gilla Patraic. It's not a universally accepted one, of course, and it has been already discussed. That would count under the title of this thread- ancestors of Gilla Patraic. I did not skip over the lineage presented by Baldwin, as I questioned whether it could be accepted because of the doubt surrounding Diarmait mac Cerbaill. I never questioned the actual line presented, at least back to Diarmait mac Cerbaill- because it seems probable. Confusing, but probable.
Isn't the statement "It's not a universally accepted one" a huge understatement, given that the only alleged evidence for the (almost certainly false) claim that Echrad was the mother of Domnall rests on an obviously corrupt entry in a single manuscript, which then needs to be further altered until it states the desired relationship.

I agree that it would be nice to find a well documented line from "Eve" of Leinster back to one of the Uí Néill kings, but when doing genealogy, it is important to follow the evidence to wherever it leads. Concentrating ones efforts on finding a descent from a specific family or individual results in bad genealogy more often than not. Once descent from a specific individual becomes the main goal of genealogical research, wishful thinking and lack of objectivity will often result in the evidence being tortured until (the illusion of) that goal is achieved.

Stewart Baldwin
d***@aol.com
2018-04-05 13:55:31 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
If one was to accept Echrad ingen Matudan as the mother of Donnchad mac Cellaig, there would be a descent from Niall to Gilla Patraic. It's not a universally accepted one, of course, and it has been already discussed. That would count under the title of this thread- ancestors of Gilla Patraic. I did not skip over the lineage presented by Baldwin, as I questioned whether it could be accepted because of the doubt surrounding Diarmait mac Cerbaill. I never questioned the actual line presented, at least back to Diarmait mac Cerbaill- because it seems probable. Confusing, but probable.
Again, the following line of descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages may not be the best documented line but is, however, a valid line.

1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann
17. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
20. Mac Carraig Calma [(adopted the surname “Mac Carraig Calma”) (ordinance of surnames by Brian Boru, 1002-1014)]
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma (in the 11th century, Mac was a contraction for “mac meic”, meaning “son of the son of”) (ingen Mac Carraig Calma literally means “daughter of the son of the son of” Carrach Calma) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow

References for Generations 1-4 & 18-22:

Byrne, F.J. “Irish Kings and High-Kings”. 2nd ed. (Four Courts Press: Dublin, 2001): p. 90 (author states, “It is remarkable that the Síl nÁedo Sláine and Clann Cholmáin derive their origin, not directly from Niall Noígiallach, but from his great-grandson Diarmait mac Cerbaill. The annals date Diarmait's reign as high-king from about 544 to 565. The petty Uí Néill kings of Cenél nArdgail traced their ancestry to an uncle of Diarmait's, but never won the high kingship.”).

O’Hart, John. “Irish Pedigrees”. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. xxi (author states, “With reference to the origin of sirnames in Ireland it may be mentioned that, in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe [Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a particular sirname (or sire-name); the more correctly to preserve the history and genealogy of the different Irish tribes. Each family was at liberty to adopt a sirname from some particular ancestor, and, generally, took their names from some chief of their tribe who was celebrated for his valour, wisdom, piety, or some other great qualities. And the members of a family, each in addition to his own proper name, took, as a common designation, the name of their father, or their grandfather, or of some more remote ancestor.”).

Dobbs, Margaret E. (ed. and tr.), “The Banshenchus [part 2]”, Revue Celtique, Vol. 48, (1931): p. 198 (author states, “Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma dicloind Cholmain Moir, mathair Laigsich (ob. 1149?) m. Aimirgin rig Laigsi.”).

Byrne, F.J. “Irish Kings and High-Kings”. 2nd ed. (Four Courts Press: Dublin, 2001): pp. xxxiv-xxxv (author states, “Mac in surnames is a contraction of mac meic, ‘son of the son of’, used as an alternative to ua ‘grandson’ in the eleventh century.”).

A New History of Ireland: Volume IX: Maps, Genealogies, Lists: A Companion to Irish History, Part 2. Moody, T.W., et al., editors. (Clarendon Press, 1984): [see Table 4] (Donnchad "Carrach Calma" mac Murchada = "Carraig Calma").
d***@aol.com
2018-04-05 14:01:56 UTC
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Again, the following line of descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages may not be the best documented line but is, however, a valid line.


1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann
17. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
20. Mac Carraig Calma [(adopted the surname “Mac Carraig Calma”) (ordinance of surnames by Brian Boru, 1002-1014)]
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma (in the 11th century, Mac was a contraction for “mac meic”, meaning “son of the son of”) (ingen Mac Carraig Calma literally means “daughter of the son of the son of” Carrach Calma) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow

References for Generations 2-4 & 20-22:

Byrne, F.J. “Irish Kings and High-Kings”. 2nd ed. (Four Courts Press: Dublin, 2001): p. 90 (author states, “It is remarkable that the Síl nÁedo Sláine and Clann Cholmáin derive their origin, not directly from Niall Noígiallach, but from his great-grandson Diarmait mac Cerbaill. The annals date Diarmait's reign as high-king from about 544 to 565. The petty Uí Néill kings of Cenél nArdgail traced their ancestry to an uncle of Diarmait's, but never won the high kingship.”).

Dobbs, Margaret E. (ed. and tr.), “The Banshenchus [part 2]”, Revue Celtique, Vol. 48, (1931): p. 198 (author states, “Gormlaid ingen mic (ob. 1017) Carraich Calma dicloind Cholmain Moir, mathair Laigsich (ob. 1149?) m. Aimirgin rig Laigsi.”).

Byrne, F.J. “Irish Kings and High-Kings”. 2nd ed. (Four Courts Press: Dublin, 2001): pp. xxxiv-xxxv (author states, “Mac in surnames is a contraction of mac meic, ‘son of the son of’, used as an alternative to ua ‘grandson’ in the eleventh century.”).

O’Hart, John. “Irish Pedigrees”. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. xxi (author states, “With reference to the origin of sirnames in Ireland it may be mentioned that, in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe [Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a particular sirname (or sire-name); the more correctly to preserve the history and genealogy of the different Irish tribes. Each family was at liberty to adopt a sirname from some particular ancestor, and, generally, took their names from some chief of their tribe who was celebrated for his valour, wisdom, piety, or some other great qualities. And the members of a family, each in addition to his own proper name, took, as a common designation, the name of their father, or their grandfather, or of some more remote ancestor.”).

A New History of Ireland: Volume IX: Maps, Genealogies, Lists: A Companion to Irish History, Part 2. Moody, T.W., et al., editors. (Clarendon Press, 1984): [see Table 4] (Donnchad “Carrach Calma” mac Murchada = “Carraig Calma”).
taf
2018-04-05 15:15:17 UTC
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Post by d***@aol.com
Again, the following line of descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages may
not be the best documented line but is, however, a valid line.
If it is not well-documented, on what basis does one conclude it is valid?
Post by d***@aol.com
O’Hart, John. “Irish Pedigrees”. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. xxi (author
states, “With reference to the origin of sirnames in Ireland it may be
mentioned that, in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe
[Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a
particular sirname (or sire-name); the more correctly to preserve the
history and genealogy of the different Irish tribes. Each family was at
liberty to adopt a sirname from some particular ancestor, and, generally,
took their names from some chief of their tribe who was celebrated for
his valour, wisdom, piety, or some other great qualities. And the members
of a family, each in addition to his own proper name, took, as a common
designation, the name of their father, or their grandfather, or of some
more remote ancestor.”).
I would be very much surprised if events transpired as described by O'Hart, who was not the most critical of scholars when it came to repeating Irish pseudo-historical traditions.

taf
d***@aol.com
2018-04-05 15:47:24 UTC
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Post by taf
I would be very much surprised if events transpired as described by O'Hart, who was not the most critical of scholars when it came to repeating Irish pseudo-historical traditions.
taf
Just because you believe that O'Hart was not the most critical of scholars does not automatically make the events that transpired in the 11th century, as he has stated, inaccurate. Stewart Baldwin stated, "surnames were already developing at that time." The time he was referring to was obviously the 11th century. I'm sure you have enlightening comments on Byrne, Dobbs, or any other source that might be listed by myself or anyone else, but the point to the post was to highlight something that was already stated as available by Stewart Baldwin.

Some of us (except for Will) do not want to or wish to debate the most renowned expert on soc.genealogy.medieval regarding matters of history or DNA. So for the sake of argument, let's just say there are some better scholars out there for this time period than O'Hart. However, I would not dismiss everything he said because of a lack of critical acclaim.
taf
2018-04-05 21:57:11 UTC
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Post by d***@aol.com
Post by taf
I would be very much surprised if events transpired as described by O'Hart, who was not the most critical of scholars when it came to repeating Irish pseudo-historical traditions.
taf
Just because you believe that O'Hart was not the most critical of scholars
does not automatically make the events that transpired in the 11th century,
as he has stated, inaccurate.
The fact that he said it does not automatically make it inaccurate, but given how many of the things he says are more akin to foundation myths, there is good reason to view it all with extreme skepticism.
Post by d***@aol.com
Stewart Baldwin stated, "surnames were already developing at that time."
The time he was referring to was obviously the 11th century.
There is a distinct difference between 'surnames were developing' and 'King Brian Boru passed an ordinance that mandated the adoption of surnames so as to more correctly record and preserve family history and genealogy'. The former is generic, the latter quite specific, and seemingly anachronistic. Just imagine the level of state administration. Vikings are overrunning major population centers and the king responds by ensuring that genealogists and historians don't get confused over surnames. While all of us here can appreciate the sentiment, I rather think he had more important priorities, and that O'Hart has given us a (or rather, another) just-so story.
Post by d***@aol.com
. . . but the point to the post was to highlight something that was already
stated as available by Stewart Baldwin.
Stewart Baldwin said nothing about an ordinance, nothing about Brian Boru.
Post by d***@aol.com
However, I would not dismiss everything he said because of a lack of
critical acclaim.
It is not critical acclaim but a lack of critical skills (or rather, lack of any desire to address the tales he was relating with a critical eye) that is the problem. That is a very good reason for a genealogist to view with extreme skepticism everything that an author says, because if an author made no attempt to separate authentic history from mythology, then the reader has no basis for concluding any given statement is one versus the other unless it is supported independently.

So, what is the earliest source you have that attributes to King Brian Boru such an administrative mandate, and provides his purpose for enacting it?

taf
Peter Stewart
2018-04-05 22:11:06 UTC
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Post by d***@aol.com
Post by taf
I would be very much surprised if events transpired as described by O'Hart, who was not the most critical of scholars when it came to repeating Irish pseudo-historical traditions.
taf
Just because you believe that O'Hart was not the most critical of scholars does not automatically make the events that transpired in the 11th century, as he has stated, inaccurate. Stewart Baldwin stated, "surnames were already developing at that time." The time he was referring to was obviously the 11th century. I'm sure you have enlightening comments on Byrne, Dobbs, or any other source that might be listed by myself or anyone else, but the point to the post was to highlight something that was already stated as available by Stewart Baldwin.
Some of us (except for Will) do not want to or wish to debate the most renowned expert on soc.genealogy.medieval regarding matters of history or DNA. So for the sake of argument, let's just say there are some better scholars out there for this time period than O'Hart. However, I would not dismiss everything he said because of a lack of critical acclaim.
Why don't you try to find some actual evidence for the assertion by O'Hart that you are defending? ("in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe [Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a particular sirname (or sire-name)") If true this ought to be readily proved.

You might start with the list of works on Irish anthroponymy here:

https://bill.celt.dias.ie/vol4/classificationindex.php?ClassificationID=71

Peter Stewart
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-06 00:07:01 UTC
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Post by d***@aol.com
Again, the following line of descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages may not be the best documented line but is, however, a valid line.
1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
[snip]

As has already been discussed, the evidence for the ancestry of Diarmait mac Cerbaill is late and unsatisfactory. The documented line starts with Diarmait and his father Cerball, about whom nothing is known beyond his name, as evidenced by Diarmait's patronymic. Diarmait's father should be called simply Cerball, not Fergus Cerrbél, a name which depends on late evidence, and could very well be a sloppy attempt to combine two contradictory sources.

[generations omitted to save space]
Post by d***@aol.com
16. Oengus Rig-damna Temrach mac Flann
17. Murhcad mac Oengus Rig-damna Temrach
The designation "rigdamna Temrach" ("rigdamna" of Tara) is a title, and should not be inserted in the middle of the name. So, also correcting a couple of typos, these two should be called Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara, and Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara. I prefer translating "Temrach" ("of Tara") into English as an aid to those who don't know what it means. On the other hand, the meaning of the middle Irish term "rigdamna" is not entirely certain, and is best left untranslated. Based on modern scholarship, it probably means something along the lines of "king candidate" (i.e., someone who was regarded as a possible future king).
Post by d***@aol.com
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017)
20. Mac Carraig Calma [(adopted the surname “Mac Carraig Calma”) (ordinance of surnames by Brian Boru, 1002-1014)]
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma (in the 11th century, Mac was a contraction for “mac meic”, meaning “son of the son of”) (ingen Mac Carraig Calma literally means “daughter of the son of the son of” Carrach Calma) = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
I went back to some other material to refresh my memory on this subject, and in addition to his son Oengus mac Carraig Calma (d. 1017), rigdamna of Tara, the Annals of Ulster mention three grandsons of Carrach Calma, namely Muirchertach ua Carraig (d. 1022), rigdamna of Tara, Conchobar ua Carraig (d. 1023), and Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033). As Oengus seems to be the only son of Carrach Calma who is known by name, he is the most likely candidate for the father of these grandchildren, but that is not certain. The most likely number of generations is what you show above, but in my opinion, the false precision used above is not suitable for such "discontinuous" cases where we only have evidence that someone was a descendant, without knowing the number of generations or exact path of descent.

Capitalized "Mac" means "son of" and is not a contraction of "mac meic" (son of the son of). The difference between "mac" and "Mac" does not appear in the early manuscripts, and is a purely modern convention, with uncaptalized "mac" being used when the individual was literally a son of the man indicated in the patronymic, and "Mac" is used when he was a more remote descendant (that being indirect evidence that the name was being used as a surname). A similar convention is used with "ua/Ua" (grandson of). For more on Irish surnames, see the comments below about O'Hart.
Post by d***@aol.com
O’Hart, John. “Irish Pedigrees”. Vol. 1, (Dublin, 1892): p. xxi (author states, “With reference to the origin of sirnames in Ireland it may be mentioned that, in the eleventh century, the Irish Monarch Brian Boroimhe [Born] made an ordinance that every Irish family and clan should assume a particular sirname (or sire-name); the more correctly to preserve the history and genealogy of the different Irish tribes. Each family was at liberty to adopt a sirname from some particular ancestor, and, generally, took their names from some chief of their tribe who was celebrated for his valour, wisdom, piety, or some other great qualities. And the members of a family, each in addition to his own proper name, took, as a common designation, the name of their father, or their grandfather, or of some more remote ancestor.”).
The above description is complete hogwash. There is no good evidence for the existence of such an ordinance [... unless you regard the following "evidence" to be acceptable: 1. Most of the principal Irish surnames first appeared in between the tenth and twelfth centuries. 2. Brian was the best known Irish king of that period. 3. Therefore, Brian passed such an ordinance. QED]. O'Hart is an absolutely terrible source to use for early Irish genealogy. He can be considered a "scholar" only in the loose sense that he was an amateur enthusiast who diligently (but uncritically) gathered a large amount of genealogical material on early Irish families, and then published the first relatively comprehensive book on the subject that was easily available to the general public. As a result, its "authority" held sway for far too long. I would consider O'Hart to be so bad that in the vast majority of cases, it is not worth citing (and any exceptions would be for a much later period). For early Ireland, if you can't find something in a source better than O'Hart, then it probably isn't right anyway.

As for the development of Irish surnames, there is hardly any DIRECT evidence telling us how this came about. There is a lot of evidence on the process, but it is nearly all indirect, consisting mainly of observations from the records showing that the manner in which individuals were identified changed gradually from a patronymic system (X mac Y) to a surname system (X Ua Y, where "ua" more loosely defined as "descendant" rather than the more literal "grandson"). Much less frequently (in Ireland), some surnames developed using "Mac" rather than "Ua" (later "O"). [In contrast, many more Scottish surnames were of the "Mac" type, but the early Scottish records are far too slim to observe the process.] In the early period of development, before the surnames gradually became standardized, you see occasional cases where both the "Mac" and "Ua" prefixes were used for descendant of the same man. The evidence shows that Irish surnames did not all develop suddenly around the same time, but gradually over a couple of centuries, becoming at first a novelty, slowly evolving into a widely used custom.

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-04-08 00:43:49 UTC
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An interesting fact related to the hunt for Ui Neill descents, relates to Bé Binn inion Urchadh, the mother of Brian Boru. She was of the Uí Briúin Seóla, who descended from Brión mac Echach Muigmedóin, the half-brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Brion had the same legendary descent from the High Kings such as Conn of the Hundred Battles. The problem, of course, is that the Uí Briúin genealogies were possibly forged, and it doesn't even seem possible to trace Brian's mother back to Brion mac Eochaid Mugmedon. But either way, it is an interesting fact.
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-08 19:19:02 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
An interesting fact related to the hunt for Ui Neill descents, relates to Bé Binn inion Urchadh, the mother of Brian Boru. She was of the Uí Briúin Seóla, who descended from Brión mac Echach Muigmedóin, the half-brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Brion had the same legendary descent from the High Kings such as Conn of the Hundred Battles. The problem, of course, is that the Uí Briúin genealogies were possibly forged, and it doesn't even seem possible to trace Brian's mother back to Brion mac Eochaid Mugmedon. But either way, it is an interesting fact.
The believable part of the ancestry of Brian's mother Bé Bind could be given as follows. The five intermediate generations which have no confirmation in sources like the annals are of some concern, but the number of generations is about right, and we know that genealogies were being actively compiled during that period, so barring scribal errors (which we have no way of checking), it is likely that that part of the genealogy is valid. We have no reason to be so confident about the generations before Cenn Fáelad mac Colgan (other than accepting Colgú as his father's name from his patronymic), which are a string of unverified names, fading out into the period of myth and legend.

1. Colgú [mac Áeda ...].
2. Cenn Fáelad mac Colgan, d. ca. 682, king of Connacht.
3. Amalgaid mac Cind Fáelad.
4. Flann Rodba mac Amalgada.
5. Fiangalach mac Flainn Rodba.
6. Flaithnia mac Fiangalaig.
7. Máenach mac Flaithnia.
8. Murchad mac Máenaig, d. 896, king of Iarthar (West) Connacht.
9. Aurchad mac Murchada, d. 945, king of Iarthar Connacht [Uí Briúin Seóla], m. Osnad ingen Crecháin.
10. Bé Bind ingen Aurchada, m. (1) Cennétig mac Lorcain, d. 951, king of Tuath Muman (Thomond), m. (2) Máel Sechnaill mac Arda.
11. Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig, d. 23 April 1014, king of Ireland.

Aurchad's wife Osnad was a daughter of Crechán mac Angaile by his wife Cianóg ingen Cicharáin, two obscure individuals whose further ancestry is unknown, so far as I know. [See Silva Gadelica, vol. 2, pp. 488, 536, 573-4; Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 7 (1910): 307-8.]

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-04-08 22:31:09 UTC
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What is the source for placing Osnad ingen Crecháin as the maternal grandmother of Brian Boru?
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-09 00:38:17 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
What is the source for placing Osnad ingen Crecháin as the maternal grandmother of Brian Boru?
Read my posting. The sources are provided there.

Stewart Baldwin
HWinnSadler
2018-04-09 01:57:44 UTC
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I must have missed them when I first read your post. Thank you for pointing that out.

Hunter Winn-Saddler
d***@aol.com
2018-04-11 14:46:54 UTC
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To conclude with what this thread ultimately turned out to be, a quest to find a line of descent for Eve of Leinster from Uí Néill kings, the following is presented. While the following line of descent has yet to be completely proven, it is one of the most probable given the prevailing evidence to date for a descent from Uí Néill kings to Eve of Leinster. Some of the generations have already been commented on previously, so there is no point to rehash that again. Therefore, before picking apart every single generation, take heed of where it says “one of the most probable” lines of descent. The spelling of given names and placement of titles have been corrected where needed.

1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara
17. Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma, rigdamna of Tara (d. 1017)
20. Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033)
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
d***@aol.com
2018-04-11 14:59:27 UTC
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To conclude with what this thread ultimately turned out being, a quest to find a descent for Eve of Leinster from Uí Néill kings, the following is presented. While the following line of descent has yet to be completely proven, it is one of the most probable given the prevailing evidence to date for a descent from Uí Néill kings to Eve of Leinster. Some of the generations have already been commented on previously, so we don’t need to rehash over that again. Therefore, before picking apart every single generation, take heed of the where it says “one of the most probable” lines of descent. The spelling of given names and placement of titles have been corrected where needed.

1. Niall of the Nine Hostages
2. Conall Cremthainne
3. Fergus Cerrbél
4. Diarmait mac Cerbaill
5. Colmán Már mac Diarmato
6. Suibne mac Colmáin
7. Conall Guthbinn mac Suibni
8. Airmetach Cáech mac Conaill
9. Diarmait Dian mac Airmetaig
10. Murchad Midi mac Diarmato
11. Domnall Midi mac Murchada
12. Donnchad Midi mac Domnaill
13. Máel Ruanaid mac Donnchada
14. Máel Sechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid
15. Flann Sinna mac Máele Sechnaill
16. Oengus mac Flainn, rigdamna of Tara
17. Murchad mac Oengusa, rigdamna of Tara
18. Donnchad Carrach Calma mac Murchada (d. 969)
19. Oengus mac Carraig Calma, rigdamna of Tara (d. 1017)
20. Máel Ruanaid ua Carraig Calma (d. 1033)
21. Gormlaith ingen Mac Carraig Calma = Amargen Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1097)
22. Loigsech Ua Morda, king of Loigsi (d. 1149) = Gormlaith ingen Finn Ua Caellaide
23. Cacht ingen Loigsig Ua Morda = Muirchertach Ua Tuathail, king of Ui Muiredaig (d. 1146)
24. Mor ingen Muirchertaig Ua Tuathail = Diarmait Mac Murchada, king of Laigin (Leinster) (d. 1171)
25. Aoife ingen Diarmata = Richard Strongbow
HWinnSadler
2018-04-12 04:14:48 UTC
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I've noticed that as well, on a bunch of threads.
taf
2018-04-12 07:12:19 UTC
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Post by HWinnSadler
I've noticed that as well, on a bunch of threads.
I can't comment on the cases in this thread because I haven't seen any before being deleted, but in other circumstances, it has been:

1. removed so it could be replaced with a corrected version

2. poster's remorse - usually an insult hurled then regretted, or a hypothesis they immediately realized wasn't possible, or mistakenly including personal information

3. a certain poster deciding they wanted to 'take back' posted material for a planned publication

4. the same poster trying to protect their public image by removing a post that subsequent discussion proved was poorly thought out

5. that same poster becoming annoyed over the lack of fawning acceptance and 'taking their ball and going home', wiping out their contributions to the entire thread

6. one poster actually went through and removed their entire posting history

I am sure there are other reasons, but those are the ones I remember having seen.

taf
Peter Stewart
2018-04-12 10:16:46 UTC
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Post by taf
Post by HWinnSadler
I've noticed that as well, on a bunch of threads.
1. removed so it could be replaced with a corrected version
2. poster's remorse - usually an insult hurled then regretted, or a hypothesis they immediately realized wasn't possible, or mistakenly including personal information
3. a certain poster deciding they wanted to 'take back' posted material for a planned publication
4. the same poster trying to protect their public image by removing a post that subsequent discussion proved was poorly thought out
5. that same poster becoming annoyed over the lack of fawning acceptance and 'taking their ball and going home', wiping out their contributions to the entire thread
6. one poster actually went through and removed their entire posting history
I am sure there are other reasons, but those are the ones I remember having seen.
Golly - I frequently make mistakes in posts, but since sgm is a newsgroup and not a court of law this is hardly worth bothering about: I post corrections whenever it seems worthwhile.

It has never occurred to me that a bollixed post should be deleted, but then I'm not here touting for business or cadging free research assistance towards publication ...

Peter Stewart
s***@mindspring.com
2018-04-12 13:52:17 UTC
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Post by taf
Post by HWinnSadler
I've noticed that as well, on a bunch of threads.
1. removed so it could be replaced with a corrected version
2. poster's remorse - usually an insult hurled then regretted, or a hypothesis they immediately realized wasn't possible, or mistakenly including personal information
3. a certain poster deciding they wanted to 'take back' posted material for a planned publication
4. the same poster trying to protect their public image by removing a post that subsequent discussion proved was poorly thought out
5. that same poster becoming annoyed over the lack of fawning acceptance and 'taking their ball and going home', wiping out their contributions to the entire thread
6. one poster actually went through and removed their entire posting history
I am sure there are other reasons, but those are the ones I remember having seen.
taf
When a posting gets deleted after part of it was quoted by someone else who responded, does the quoted part of the second remain, or is it removed also?

Stewart Baldwin
taf
2018-04-12 14:17:07 UTC
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Post by s***@mindspring.com
When a posting gets deleted after part of it was quoted by someone
else who responded, does the quoted part of the second remain, or
is it removed also?
Quoted text is part and parcel of the new post. Since you are using Google Groups you can see what this looks like. Using the little pulldown menu at the top right of this post, select "Show original" and you will see the full components of a post, in all its glory (well, most of its glory - Google does mask all emails in Groups, though the full unmasked emails are released to Usenet). Each such post is a stand-alone, indivisible item. One line in that long list of headers you see indicates what prior post it is in response to, and that is what most newsreaders use to do threading. Google Groups doesn't actually do it this way - at least last I checked, it matches up subject lines, which is why posts there are listed in chronological sequence within a thread, and not truly threaded (showing which post was a response to which other specific post). Every once in a while, someone will coincidentally reuse a subject line and it will show up as if it was part of an unrelated old thread.

taf
John Higgins
2018-04-12 19:36:36 UTC
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Post by taf
Post by HWinnSadler
I've noticed that as well, on a bunch of threads.
1. removed so it could be replaced with a corrected version
2. poster's remorse - usually an insult hurled then regretted, or a hypothesis they immediately realized wasn't possible, or mistakenly including personal information
3. a certain poster deciding they wanted to 'take back' posted material for a planned publication
4. the same poster trying to protect their public image by removing a post that subsequent discussion proved was poorly thought out
5. that same poster becoming annoyed over the lack of fawning acceptance and 'taking their ball and going home', wiping out their contributions to the entire thread
6. one poster actually went through and removed their entire posting history
I am sure there are other reasons, but those are the ones I remember having seen.
taf
One advantage of the gateway between SGM and GenMed was that, in recent years, the archives were (pretty much) mirrors of one another - aside from occasional hiccups. But the GenMed archive was actually more complete the the SGM archive (at least via Google Groups), because messages posted on SGM and later deleted by the original poster (for any of the reasons that Todd mentions) remained intact in the GenMed archive - i.e. the "delete" action was not passed through the gateway. That was one of several advantages of the GenMed archive over the Google Groups archive.
taf
2018-04-12 22:35:58 UTC
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Post by John Higgins
But the GenMed archive was actually more complete the the SGM archive
(at least via Google Groups), because messages posted on SGM and later
deleted by the original poster (for any of the reasons that Todd
mentions) remained intact in the GenMed archive - i.e. the "delete"
action was not passed through the gateway. That was one of several
advantages of the GenMed archive over the Google Groups archive.
I am not sure which was more complete - with the pseudo-moderation of GEN-MED, posters in the 'sin bin' will not have all their posts appear there. Also I know of at least one poster contributing through GEN-MED who would routinely include a header to stop it from being archived at Rootsweb, but Google ignores such settings on the other side, so those messages still are seen at s.g.m. Historically, flukes in the GEN-MED archiving meant that the s.g.m was more complete, except for the unfortunate loss of almost the entire first few years (when Deja.com went belly-under, Google rebuilt the Usenet archive from other sources, and the only s.g.m posts that made it back were the ones that were crossposted to other groups, and came in when the others were restored). Because thegateway was particularly flaky in the early years, many of the early posts never made it to GEN-MED (or at least never made it to the archive).

taf
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