Discussion:
Descent from Edward III for Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of Rhode Island
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Brad Verity
2012-05-05 22:03:24 UTC
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From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor. A description of him in a post by blogger 'Mike in New
Hampshire' sums him up: "He was in New England mostly to scoop up as
much wealth as possible by controlling who got what land that was
granted to Mason and now being managed by his son. Using the power of
his office, he assigned councilors, dismissed and punished the ones
that disagreed with him, convened and disbanded councils at will,
etc. He had tried raising all kinds of taxes, jailing people
(including Pastors) and anything else he could think of to further his
fortune. In the end, the colonists hated him. His Sheriffs’ and Tax
collectors were driven off or beaten and his orders ignored. London
finally gave him the boot in 1685, the same year James II ascended to
the throne." (http://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/edward-cranfield/)

Jeremy Belknap wrote 'The History of New Hampshire' in the 1700s, and
gives some further information on Edward Cranfield in a footnote (2nd
Edition, pub. 1813, Vol. II, p. 369):

http://books.google.ca/books?id=ipY-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369&dq=Edward+Cranfield+buried+Bath&hl=en&sa=X&ei=A5ilT9TuJaeciALU85X5Bw&sqi=2&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Edward%20Cranfield%20buried%20Bath&f=false

The information includes the intriguing facts that Cranfield was "of
the family of Lord Monteagle", that he went to Barbados after New
Hampshire, that "he died about the beginning of the prefent century",
that "he was buried in the Cathedral Church, at Bath, in England",
and, most interesting, is that he left descendants, including at least
one in Jamaica, Belknap's informant.

Cranfield appears to have been buried at Bath Abbey on 8 November
1700:

http://archive.org/stream/registersabbeyc00jewegoog#page/n79/mode/2up

'Complete Peerage', Vol. 9 (1936), p. 232 (sub Morley), gives one of
the daughters of William, 13th Lord Morley & Monteagle as “(ii)
Elizabeth, who m. Edward Cranfield, of whose issue, if any, nothing is
known.” The chronology works well for Governor Edward Cranfield to
have been her son, which is what his brief bio in Wikipedia presumes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Cranfield

If so, Governor Cranfield had many descents from Edward III thru his
mother Hon. Elizabeth Parker. Here is one:

Edward III, who had:
1) Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence (1338-1368), who had
2) Philippa of Clarence, Countess of March (1355-1377), who had
3) Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy
(1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Eleanor
Neville (1403-1472), and had
5) Anne Percy (1443-1522) m. 1) Sir Thomas Hungerford (c.1442-1469),
and had
6) Mary, Lady Hungerford (1468-1533) m. 1) Edward, 2nd Lord Hastings
(1466-1506), and had
7) Anne Hastings (c.1485-1550) m. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby (c.
1481-1521), and had
8) Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509-1572) m. 1) Lady Dorothy
Howard, and had
9) Lady Elizabeth Stanley (c.1535-1591) m. Henry Parker, 11th Lord
Morley (1531-1577), and had
10) Edward Parker, 12th Lord Morley (c.1552-1618) m. Elizabeth Stanley
of Monteagle (1558-1585), and had
11) William Parker, 13th Lord Morley (1575-1622) m. Elizabeth Tresham
(1573-1648), and had
12) Hon. Elizabeth Parker m. Edward Cranfield (of London?), and had
13) Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of New Hampshire 1682-1685

Certainly more information needs to be gathered for the parents of
Governor Cranfield. I at first thought Elizabeth Parker's husband was
Hon. Edward Cranfield of Copt Hall (c.1625-1648), youngest son of the
1st Earl of Middlesex, but he appears to have died unmarried. He was
probably near-related though, as the 1st Earl of Middlesex was from a
family of wealthy London merchants.

Whether it was Edward Cranfield the Governor, or his father who
brought the following suit is unclear:

"25 July 1663 -- Application for an order to stay a suit brought in
the Prerogative Court by Edward Cranfield against Lord Morley. Lords
Journals, XI. 574." [A2A Catalogue/Parliamentary Archives/House of
Lords: Journal Office/HL/PO/JO/10/1/319]

Any descendants of Governor Cranfield would be co-heirs to the
Baronies of Morley & Monteagle, so it will be interesting to research
further. At the least, we have an addition here to 'Complete
Peerage', as well as to 'Royal Descent of 600 Immigrants'.

Cheers, -----Brad
Brad Verity
2012-05-05 23:14:38 UTC
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Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor.
Whoops! (A Big One)

Please substitute 'New Hampshire' for 'Rhode Island' in the sentence
above (and in the title of this post).

Cheers, ------Brad
Wjhonson
2012-05-06 02:18:15 UTC
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As Far as the governor being the same man in Barbados later, I note there was an earlier Edward Cranfield in Barbados who was dead by 1649 when his mother "Mary Peisley alias Cranfield" was granted during the minority of this Edward;s children including another Edward. Mary herself then died by 1653





-----Original Message-----
From: Brad Verity <***@hotmail.com>
To: gen-medieval <gen-***@rootsweb.com>
Sent: Sat, May 5, 2012 4:55 pm
Subject: Re: Descent from Edward III for Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of Rhode Island
Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor.
Whoops! (A Big One)

Please substitute 'New Hampshire' for 'Rhode Island' in the sentence
above (and in the title of this post).

Cheers, ------Brad

-------------------------------
To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-MEDIEVAL-***@rootsweb.com
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Brad Verity
2012-05-07 05:23:21 UTC
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 As Far as the governor being the same man in Barbados later, I note there was an earlier Edward Cranfield in Barbados who was dead by 1649 when his mother "Mary Peisley alias Cranfield" was granted  during the minority of this Edward;s children including another Edward.  Mary herself then died by 1653
Interesting, Will. I wonder if the Edward Cranfield who died in
Barbados by 1649 was the husband of Hon. Elizabeth Parker and father
of Governor Edward? The chronology works, and if Elizabeth Parker had
died before her husband, it would explain why the children were
granted to his mother at his death. It may also explain why the
peerage compilers and the heralds had lost track of Elizabeth Parker's
issue - they were overseas.

Thanks & Cheers, ----Brad
Brad Verity
2012-05-07 06:46:00 UTC
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 As Far as the governor being the same man in Barbados later, I note there was an earlier Edward Cranfield in Barbados who was dead by 1649 when his mother "Mary Peisley alias Cranfield" was granted  during the minority of this Edward;s children including another Edward.  Mary herself then died by 1653
Interesting, Will. I wonder if the Edward Cranfield who died in
Barbados by 1649 was the husband of Hon. Elizabeth Parker and father
of Governor Edward? The chronology works, and if Elizabeth Parker had
died before her husband, it would explain why the children were
granted to his mother at his death. It may also explain why the
peerage compilers and the heralds had lost track of Elizabeth Parker's
issue - they were overseas.

Thanks & Cheers, ----Brad
wjhonson
2018-04-08 21:38:17 UTC
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Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor. A description of him in a post by blogger 'Mike in New
Hampshire' sums him up: "He was in New England mostly to scoop up as
much wealth as possible by controlling who got what land that was
granted to Mason and now being managed by his son. Using the power of
his office, he assigned councilors, dismissed and punished the ones
that disagreed with him, convened and disbanded councils at will,
etc. He had tried raising all kinds of taxes, jailing people
(including Pastors) and anything else he could think of to further his
fortune. In the end, the colonists hated him. His Sheriffs’ and Tax
collectors were driven off or beaten and his orders ignored. London
finally gave him the boot in 1685, the same year James II ascended to
the throne." (http://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/edward-cranfield/)
Jeremy Belknap wrote 'The History of New Hampshire' in the 1700s, and
gives some further information on Edward Cranfield in a footnote (2nd
http://books.google.ca/books?id=ipY-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369&dq=Edward+Cranfield+buried+Bath&hl=en&sa=X&ei=A5ilT9TuJaeciALU85X5Bw&sqi=2&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Edward%20Cranfield%20buried%20Bath&f=false
The information includes the intriguing facts that Cranfield was "of
the family of Lord Monteagle", that he went to Barbados after New
Hampshire, that "he died about the beginning of the prefent century",
that "he was buried in the Cathedral Church, at Bath, in England",
and, most interesting, is that he left descendants, including at least
one in Jamaica, Belknap's informant.
Cranfield appears to have been buried at Bath Abbey on 8 November
http://archive.org/stream/registersabbeyc00jewegoog#page/n79/mode/2up
'Complete Peerage', Vol. 9 (1936), p. 232 (sub Morley), gives one of
the daughters of William, 13th Lord Morley & Monteagle as “(ii)
Elizabeth, who m. Edward Cranfield, of whose issue, if any, nothing is
known.” The chronology works well for Governor Edward Cranfield to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Cranfield
If so, Governor Cranfield had many descents from Edward III thru his
1) Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence (1338-1368), who had
2) Philippa of Clarence, Countess of March (1355-1377), who had
3) Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy
(1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Eleanor
Neville (1403-1472), and had
5) Anne Percy (1443-1522) m. 1) Sir Thomas Hungerford (c.1442-1469),
and had
6) Mary, Lady Hungerford (1468-1533) m. 1) Edward, 2nd Lord Hastings
(1466-1506), and had
7) Anne Hastings (c.1485-1550) m. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby (c.
1481-1521), and had
8) Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509-1572) m. 1) Lady Dorothy
Howard, and had
9) Lady Elizabeth Stanley (c.1535-1591) m. Henry Parker, 11th Lord
Morley (1531-1577), and had
10) Edward Parker, 12th Lord Morley (c.1552-1618) m. Elizabeth Stanley
of Monteagle (1558-1585), and had
11) William Parker, 13th Lord Morley (1575-1622) m. Elizabeth Tresham
(1573-1648), and had
12) Hon. Elizabeth Parker m. Edward Cranfield (of London?), and had
13) Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of New Hampshire 1682-1685
Certainly more information needs to be gathered for the parents of
Governor Cranfield. I at first thought Elizabeth Parker's husband was
Hon. Edward Cranfield of Copt Hall (c.1625-1648), youngest son of the
1st Earl of Middlesex, but he appears to have died unmarried. He was
probably near-related though, as the 1st Earl of Middlesex was from a
family of wealthy London merchants.
Whether it was Edward Cranfield the Governor, or his father who
"25 July 1663 -- Application for an order to stay a suit brought in
the Prerogative Court by Edward Cranfield against Lord Morley. Lords
Journals, XI. 574." [A2A Catalogue/Parliamentary Archives/House of
Lords: Journal Office/HL/PO/JO/10/1/319]
Any descendants of Governor Cranfield would be co-heirs to the
Baronies of Morley & Monteagle, so it will be interesting to research
further. At the least, we have an addition here to 'Complete
Peerage', as well as to 'Royal Descent of 600 Immigrants'.
Cheers, -----Brad
Could perhaps the will of Elizabeth (Tresham), I presume called Lady Morley be found? I note that she died in 1648 more than twenty years after her husband, and would I assume have mentioned her grandchildren were there any, by Elizabeth
wjhonson
2018-04-08 21:53:41 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor. A description of him in a post by blogger 'Mike in New
Hampshire' sums him up: "He was in New England mostly to scoop up as
much wealth as possible by controlling who got what land that was
granted to Mason and now being managed by his son. Using the power of
his office, he assigned councilors, dismissed and punished the ones
that disagreed with him, convened and disbanded councils at will,
etc. He had tried raising all kinds of taxes, jailing people
(including Pastors) and anything else he could think of to further his
fortune. In the end, the colonists hated him. His Sheriffs’ and Tax
collectors were driven off or beaten and his orders ignored. London
finally gave him the boot in 1685, the same year James II ascended to
the throne." (http://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/edward-cranfield/)
Jeremy Belknap wrote 'The History of New Hampshire' in the 1700s, and
gives some further information on Edward Cranfield in a footnote (2nd
http://books.google.ca/books?id=ipY-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369&dq=Edward+Cranfield+buried+Bath&hl=en&sa=X&ei=A5ilT9TuJaeciALU85X5Bw&sqi=2&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Edward%20Cranfield%20buried%20Bath&f=false
The information includes the intriguing facts that Cranfield was "of
the family of Lord Monteagle", that he went to Barbados after New
Hampshire, that "he died about the beginning of the prefent century",
that "he was buried in the Cathedral Church, at Bath, in England",
and, most interesting, is that he left descendants, including at least
one in Jamaica, Belknap's informant.
Cranfield appears to have been buried at Bath Abbey on 8 November
http://archive.org/stream/registersabbeyc00jewegoog#page/n79/mode/2up
'Complete Peerage', Vol. 9 (1936), p. 232 (sub Morley), gives one of
the daughters of William, 13th Lord Morley & Monteagle as “(ii)
Elizabeth, who m. Edward Cranfield, of whose issue, if any, nothing is
known.” The chronology works well for Governor Edward Cranfield to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Cranfield
If so, Governor Cranfield had many descents from Edward III thru his
1) Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence (1338-1368), who had
2) Philippa of Clarence, Countess of March (1355-1377), who had
3) Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy
(1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Eleanor
Neville (1403-1472), and had
5) Anne Percy (1443-1522) m. 1) Sir Thomas Hungerford (c.1442-1469),
and had
6) Mary, Lady Hungerford (1468-1533) m. 1) Edward, 2nd Lord Hastings
(1466-1506), and had
7) Anne Hastings (c.1485-1550) m. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby (c.
1481-1521), and had
8) Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509-1572) m. 1) Lady Dorothy
Howard, and had
9) Lady Elizabeth Stanley (c.1535-1591) m. Henry Parker, 11th Lord
Morley (1531-1577), and had
10) Edward Parker, 12th Lord Morley (c.1552-1618) m. Elizabeth Stanley
of Monteagle (1558-1585), and had
11) William Parker, 13th Lord Morley (1575-1622) m. Elizabeth Tresham
(1573-1648), and had
12) Hon. Elizabeth Parker m. Edward Cranfield (of London?), and had
13) Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of New Hampshire 1682-1685
Certainly more information needs to be gathered for the parents of
Governor Cranfield. I at first thought Elizabeth Parker's husband was
Hon. Edward Cranfield of Copt Hall (c.1625-1648), youngest son of the
1st Earl of Middlesex, but he appears to have died unmarried. He was
probably near-related though, as the 1st Earl of Middlesex was from a
family of wealthy London merchants.
Whether it was Edward Cranfield the Governor, or his father who
"25 July 1663 -- Application for an order to stay a suit brought in
the Prerogative Court by Edward Cranfield against Lord Morley. Lords
Journals, XI. 574." [A2A Catalogue/Parliamentary Archives/House of
Lords: Journal Office/HL/PO/JO/10/1/319]
Any descendants of Governor Cranfield would be co-heirs to the
Baronies of Morley & Monteagle, so it will be interesting to research
further. At the least, we have an addition here to 'Complete
Peerage', as well as to 'Royal Descent of 600 Immigrants'.
Cheers, -----Brad
Could perhaps the will of Elizabeth (Tresham), I presume called Lady Morley be found? I note that she died in 1648 more than twenty years after her husband, and would I assume have mentioned her grandchildren were there any, by Elizabeth
https://books.google.com/books?id=vV5083FGhJ4C&q=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&dq=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9o6aT1KvaAhUDM8AKHd09Dj0Q6wEIxQEwHQ
"Edward Cranfield, gent, usher, grandson of Lord Morley and Monteagle (s of Edward) 25 Mar 1675 by Walker, Bysshe and Dugdale. Harl. MS"
r***@yahoo.com
2018-04-09 22:57:05 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor. A description of him in a post by blogger 'Mike in New
Hampshire' sums him up: "He was in New England mostly to scoop up as
much wealth as possible by controlling who got what land that was
granted to Mason and now being managed by his son. Using the power of
his office, he assigned councilors, dismissed and punished the ones
that disagreed with him, convened and disbanded councils at will,
etc. He had tried raising all kinds of taxes, jailing people
(including Pastors) and anything else he could think of to further his
fortune. In the end, the colonists hated him. His Sheriffs’ and Tax
collectors were driven off or beaten and his orders ignored. London
finally gave him the boot in 1685, the same year James II ascended to
the throne." (http://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/edward-cranfield/)
Jeremy Belknap wrote 'The History of New Hampshire' in the 1700s, and
gives some further information on Edward Cranfield in a footnote (2nd
http://books.google.ca/books?id=ipY-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369&dq=Edward+Cranfield+buried+Bath&hl=en&sa=X&ei=A5ilT9TuJaeciALU85X5Bw&sqi=2&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Edward%20Cranfield%20buried%20Bath&f=false
The information includes the intriguing facts that Cranfield was "of
the family of Lord Monteagle", that he went to Barbados after New
Hampshire, that "he died about the beginning of the prefent century",
that "he was buried in the Cathedral Church, at Bath, in England",
and, most interesting, is that he left descendants, including at least
one in Jamaica, Belknap's informant.
Cranfield appears to have been buried at Bath Abbey on 8 November
http://archive.org/stream/registersabbeyc00jewegoog#page/n79/mode/2up
'Complete Peerage', Vol. 9 (1936), p. 232 (sub Morley), gives one of
the daughters of William, 13th Lord Morley & Monteagle as “(ii)
Elizabeth, who m. Edward Cranfield, of whose issue, if any, nothing is
known.” The chronology works well for Governor Edward Cranfield to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Cranfield
If so, Governor Cranfield had many descents from Edward III thru his
1) Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence (1338-1368), who had
2) Philippa of Clarence, Countess of March (1355-1377), who had
3) Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy
(1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Eleanor
Neville (1403-1472), and had
5) Anne Percy (1443-1522) m. 1) Sir Thomas Hungerford (c.1442-1469),
and had
6) Mary, Lady Hungerford (1468-1533) m. 1) Edward, 2nd Lord Hastings
(1466-1506), and had
7) Anne Hastings (c.1485-1550) m. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby (c.
1481-1521), and had
8) Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509-1572) m. 1) Lady Dorothy
Howard, and had
9) Lady Elizabeth Stanley (c.1535-1591) m. Henry Parker, 11th Lord
Morley (1531-1577), and had
10) Edward Parker, 12th Lord Morley (c.1552-1618) m. Elizabeth Stanley
of Monteagle (1558-1585), and had
11) William Parker, 13th Lord Morley (1575-1622) m. Elizabeth Tresham
(1573-1648), and had
12) Hon. Elizabeth Parker m. Edward Cranfield (of London?), and had
13) Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of New Hampshire 1682-1685
Certainly more information needs to be gathered for the parents of
Governor Cranfield. I at first thought Elizabeth Parker's husband was
Hon. Edward Cranfield of Copt Hall (c.1625-1648), youngest son of the
1st Earl of Middlesex, but he appears to have died unmarried. He was
probably near-related though, as the 1st Earl of Middlesex was from a
family of wealthy London merchants.
Whether it was Edward Cranfield the Governor, or his father who
"25 July 1663 -- Application for an order to stay a suit brought in
the Prerogative Court by Edward Cranfield against Lord Morley. Lords
Journals, XI. 574." [A2A Catalogue/Parliamentary Archives/House of
Lords: Journal Office/HL/PO/JO/10/1/319]
Any descendants of Governor Cranfield would be co-heirs to the
Baronies of Morley & Monteagle, so it will be interesting to research
further. At the least, we have an addition here to 'Complete
Peerage', as well as to 'Royal Descent of 600 Immigrants'.
Cheers, -----Brad
Could perhaps the will of Elizabeth (Tresham), I presume called Lady Morley be found? I note that she died in 1648 more than twenty years after her husband, and would I assume have mentioned her grandchildren were there any, by Elizabeth
https://books.google.com/books?id=vV5083FGhJ4C&q=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&dq=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9o6aT1KvaAhUDM8AKHd09Dj0Q6wEIxQEwHQ
"Edward Cranfield, gent, usher, grandson of Lord Morley and Monteagle (s of Edward) 25 Mar 1675 by Walker, Bysshe and Dugdale. Harl. MS"
https://books.google.com/books?id=iDMSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA346&dq=%22gentleman+usher%22+cranfield&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpxoj7pK7aAhXN51MKHQeSDewQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=%22gentleman%20usher%22%20cranfield&f=false
r***@yahoo.com
2018-04-09 22:59:49 UTC
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Post by r***@yahoo.com
Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Post by Brad Verity
From 1682 to 1685 the Province of Rhode Island had for its Governor,
one Edward Cranfield, Esquire, who proved a highly unpopular
Governor. A description of him in a post by blogger 'Mike in New
Hampshire' sums him up: "He was in New England mostly to scoop up as
much wealth as possible by controlling who got what land that was
granted to Mason and now being managed by his son. Using the power of
his office, he assigned councilors, dismissed and punished the ones
that disagreed with him, convened and disbanded councils at will,
etc. He had tried raising all kinds of taxes, jailing people
(including Pastors) and anything else he could think of to further his
fortune. In the end, the colonists hated him. His Sheriffs’ and Tax
collectors were driven off or beaten and his orders ignored. London
finally gave him the boot in 1685, the same year James II ascended to
the throne." (http://mikenh.wordpress.com/tag/edward-cranfield/)
Jeremy Belknap wrote 'The History of New Hampshire' in the 1700s, and
gives some further information on Edward Cranfield in a footnote (2nd
http://books.google.ca/books?id=ipY-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA369&dq=Edward+Cranfield+buried+Bath&hl=en&sa=X&ei=A5ilT9TuJaeciALU85X5Bw&sqi=2&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Edward%20Cranfield%20buried%20Bath&f=false
The information includes the intriguing facts that Cranfield was "of
the family of Lord Monteagle", that he went to Barbados after New
Hampshire, that "he died about the beginning of the prefent century",
that "he was buried in the Cathedral Church, at Bath, in England",
and, most interesting, is that he left descendants, including at least
one in Jamaica, Belknap's informant.
Cranfield appears to have been buried at Bath Abbey on 8 November
http://archive.org/stream/registersabbeyc00jewegoog#page/n79/mode/2up
'Complete Peerage', Vol. 9 (1936), p. 232 (sub Morley), gives one of
the daughters of William, 13th Lord Morley & Monteagle as “(ii)
Elizabeth, who m. Edward Cranfield, of whose issue, if any, nothing is
known.” The chronology works well for Governor Edward Cranfield to
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Cranfield
If so, Governor Cranfield had many descents from Edward III thru his
1) Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence (1338-1368), who had
2) Philippa of Clarence, Countess of March (1355-1377), who had
3) Elizabeth Mortimer (1371-1417) m. 1) Sir Henry 'Hotspur' Percy
(1364-1403), and had
4) Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1394-1455) m. Eleanor
Neville (1403-1472), and had
5) Anne Percy (1443-1522) m. 1) Sir Thomas Hungerford (c.1442-1469),
and had
6) Mary, Lady Hungerford (1468-1533) m. 1) Edward, 2nd Lord Hastings
(1466-1506), and had
7) Anne Hastings (c.1485-1550) m. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Earl of Derby (c.
1481-1521), and had
8) Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby (1509-1572) m. 1) Lady Dorothy
Howard, and had
9) Lady Elizabeth Stanley (c.1535-1591) m. Henry Parker, 11th Lord
Morley (1531-1577), and had
10) Edward Parker, 12th Lord Morley (c.1552-1618) m. Elizabeth Stanley
of Monteagle (1558-1585), and had
11) William Parker, 13th Lord Morley (1575-1622) m. Elizabeth Tresham
(1573-1648), and had
12) Hon. Elizabeth Parker m. Edward Cranfield (of London?), and had
13) Edward Cranfield (d. 1700), Governor of New Hampshire 1682-1685
Certainly more information needs to be gathered for the parents of
Governor Cranfield. I at first thought Elizabeth Parker's husband was
Hon. Edward Cranfield of Copt Hall (c.1625-1648), youngest son of the
1st Earl of Middlesex, but he appears to have died unmarried. He was
probably near-related though, as the 1st Earl of Middlesex was from a
family of wealthy London merchants.
Whether it was Edward Cranfield the Governor, or his father who
"25 July 1663 -- Application for an order to stay a suit brought in
the Prerogative Court by Edward Cranfield against Lord Morley. Lords
Journals, XI. 574." [A2A Catalogue/Parliamentary Archives/House of
Lords: Journal Office/HL/PO/JO/10/1/319]
Any descendants of Governor Cranfield would be co-heirs to the
Baronies of Morley & Monteagle, so it will be interesting to research
further. At the least, we have an addition here to 'Complete
Peerage', as well as to 'Royal Descent of 600 Immigrants'.
Cheers, -----Brad
Could perhaps the will of Elizabeth (Tresham), I presume called Lady Morley be found? I note that she died in 1648 more than twenty years after her husband, and would I assume have mentioned her grandchildren were there any, by Elizabeth
https://books.google.com/books?id=vV5083FGhJ4C&q=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&dq=edward+cranfield+lord+morley&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9o6aT1KvaAhUDM8AKHd09Dj0Q6wEIxQEwHQ
"Edward Cranfield, gent, usher, grandson of Lord Morley and Monteagle (s of Edward) 25 Mar 1675 by Walker, Bysshe and Dugdale. Harl. MS"
https://books.google.com/books?id=iDMSAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA346&dq=%22gentleman+usher%22+cranfield&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpxoj7pK7aAhXN51MKHQeSDewQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=%22gentleman%20usher%22%20cranfield&f=false
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015039595544;view=1up;seq=89
r***@yahoo.com
2018-04-09 23:27:37 UTC
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https://books.google.com/books?id=M3tfAAAAMAAJ&q=%22mary+peasley%22+barbados&dq=%22mary+peasley%22+barbados&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwis2dijqK7aAhXH6lMKHSrEA7EQ6AEIJzAA

https://books.google.com/books?id=jTwLAAAAYAAJ&q=%22mary+peasley%22+barbados&dq=%22mary+peasley%22+barbados&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwis2dijqK7aAhXH6lMKHSrEA7EQ6AEIKzAB

https://books.google.com/books?id=M3tfAAAAMAAJ&q=%22mary+peisley%22+barbados&dq=%22mary+peisley%22+barbados&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjGzPHWqK7aAhUPoVMKHVcMAmIQ6AEIKTAA

https://books.google.com/books?id=M3tfAAAAMAAJ&q=%22mary+peisley%22+london&dq=%22mary+peisley%22+london&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj2n7CGqa7aAhXK1lMKHfykBjs4FBDoAQg6MAQ

https://books.google.com/books?id=2ypsAAAAMAAJ&q=%22mary+peasley%22+london&dq=%22mary+peasley%22+london&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiH7qGtqa7aAhXHuVMKHXNkCeY4ChDoAQgtMAE
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-14 19:50:00 UTC
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More work needs to be done on this topic. Consider the statement of John Raimo, in his _Biographical Directory of American Colonial and Revolutionary Governors, 1607-1789_ 1980):

Cranfield, Edward, 1682-1685

Date and place of birth, and names of parents unknown, though he may have been related to the Edward Cranfield who was acting as a member of the Council in Barbados in July 1636. ...

https://books.google.com/books?id=95J4AAAAMAAJ&q=cranfield+barbados&dq=cranfield+barbados&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9npbn59PbAhUnw1kKHcwHAvoQ6AEIPTAE

This could be a sensible suggestion, as Cranfield _went_ to Barbados after his time in New Hampshire.

Among Barbados records, we find a will of interest:

CRANFEILD, Edward of B[arba]dos, taking a voyage to sea.
9 Feb 16'3 [? 1633/? 1639] (sic), RB6/13, p. 301.
Wf Elizabeth Cranfeild; eldest son Francis Cranfeild & younger son William Cranfeild, both under age; mo Mary Peasley in London; uncle William Goodman of Compton in the Hole, Warwickshire & friend John Harny ...

https://books.google.com/books?id=jTwLAAAAYAAJ&q=%22edward+cranfield%22+uncle&dq=%22edward+cranfield%22+uncle&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwibu6j85dPbAhVRpFkKHZgMBagQ6AEIUzAI

Though this Edward mentions no son Edward (apparently), his son Francis' 1654 will, of which I can only see a sliver, is further down on the same page, and seems to imply the first Edward had a son Edward:

CRANFIELD, [? FRANCIS], ... on a voyage with the fleet to the Indies.
7 February 1654, RB6/13, p. 130
Wf Dorothy Cranfield now residing in England & to her ch. if she hath any; mo Elizabeth Canfield (sic); bro Edward Cranfeild; friends ...

https://books.google.com/books?id=jTwLAAAAYAAJ&dq=%22edward+cranfield%22+uncle&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=%22bro+edward+cranfield%22

This snippet, below, seems to confirm that the first Edward _did_ in fact have a son Edward, as well as Francis and William:

https://books.google.com/books?id=M3tfAAAAMAAJ&q=%22mary+peisley%22+barbados&dq=%22mary+peisley%22+barbados&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjGzPHWqK7aAhUPoVMKHVcMAmIQ6AEIKTAA

Given that the first Edward's will mentions his Uncle William Goodman of Warwick and his mother Mary Peasley of London, the 1619 Northamptonshire Visitation may be important. It shows a Northants. gentry family named Goodman, with an eldest son, William Goodman, then of Ratley, Warwickshire, and a daughter "Mary, ux. Nicholas Cranfeld of London."

https://books.google.com/books?id=wLgEAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA96&dq=%22ball+of+the+towne+of%22+cranfeld&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjtxf-c9NPbAhWwxVkKHWndBm8Q6AEIKzAA#v=onepage&q=%22ball%20of%20the%20towne%20of%22%20cranfeld&f=false
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-14 21:08:37 UTC
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Some Cranfield/ Cranfeild references in _Caribbeana_.

Vol.1
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=txu.059173010222615;view=1up;seq=193

Vol.5
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=txu.059173010222659;view=1up;seq=114
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=txu.059173010222659;view=1up;seq=115
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=txu.059173010222659;view=1up;seq=243
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=txu.059173010222659;view=1up;seq=257
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-14 21:42:50 UTC
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If the New Hampshire governor was the same as the "gentleman usher," the following records might be of interest:

Cranfield, Edward _Assistant Gentleman Usher Daily Waiter_ 19 Sept. 1671 (LC 3/24 f. 7). _Gentleman Usher Daily Waiter_ 9 Mar. 1672 (_ibid_.) Res. by 4 Feb. 1682. (_ibid_.)

https://books.google.com/books?id=BYeOAAAAMAAJ&dq=usher+gentleman+cranfield&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=cranfield

[? 1682.] _Sir W. Jennings._ My lord, at the time of the sitting of the parliament at Oxford, I was in a tavern there with Mr. Cranfield, one of the king's gentleman-ushers, who seeing Mr. [Titus] Oates going along by the room, invites him to drink a glass of wine, there were a matter of some eight or nine at the table; there was a little partition-curtain, it being a long room, and there was some company beyond that curtain, somebody in that company named James Duke of York, and the King's health being drank at our table, Mr. Cranfield began a health to the duke: says Mr. Oates, 'Do not you drink York's health.' Why should we not, says Mr. Cranfield, and a gentleman or two more in the company: 'Why,' says he, 'he has ruined the nation; and if the devil has a place in Hell more hot than others, I hope he will bestow it upon him.' Several words past between Mr. Cranfield and him upon it, and the king was told of it presently.

https://books.google.com/books?id=VYA-AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA139&dq=usher+gentleman+cranfield&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj2zNvfi9TbAhVEqlkKHQkwDicQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=usher%20gentleman%20cranfield&f=false
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-15 15:47:44 UTC
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Does the Duchess of Cornwall descend from Governor Edward Cranfield of New Hampshire?

In April, I noted that Camilla probably descends from a Becher/Beecher family in Ireland, one of whose ancestors married "May Cranfield." There were a considerable number of descendants called "Cranfield Becher" or variations thereof.

https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!searchin/soc.genealogy.medieval/becher%7Csort:date/soc.genealogy.medieval/FHBIbZxroZs/X1ENHa--BwAJ

https://books.google.com/books?id=Wf16AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA307&dq=%22charlotte+m.+mr+peters%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiKjOTSzKHaAhXH0VMKHe73DQwQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=%22charlotte%20m.%20mr%20peters%22&f=false

R. E. Hardstaff, _Human Cargo and the Southwell Connection: A Record of a Slave Trading Voyage of the Eighteenth Century and the Links with People Living in the Southwell Area at That Time_ (2004), not a great title, mentions that:

"... The name Mary Cranfield was the maiden name of John Becher Senior's second wife. She was born in 1687, probably the daughter of Edward Cranfield who had been Governor of New Hampshire ..."

https://books.google.com/books?id=zpu4AAAAIAAJ&q=may+cranfield+becher&dq=may+cranfield+becher&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjAnsDX_9XbAhUQu1MKHTyJC9kQ6AEIVTAI
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-15 18:02:41 UTC
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It looks like the gentleman usher must be the same one from Barbados, as we find (p. 125):

2536. Warrant signed by James, Earl of Suffolk (deputy to Henry, Earl of Norwich, Earl Marshal) directed to the Kings and Officers of Arms, to grant arms to Edward Cranfeld, esq., gentleman usher to the King, who has performed good services to the King in the English plantations in the West Indies. 1 doc., 27 Jan. 1674/5.

https://arundelcastle.org/_pdf/TheEMCataloguepdf.pdf
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-15 18:18:50 UTC
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Thus, the line of descent seems to be ...

--Nicholas Cranfield of London = Mary Goodman (who married, 2nd, to Mr. Peasley/Peisley of London)

--Edward Cranfield (d. 1643 [? or by 1649] at Barbados) = Elizabeth Parker (living 1650s; dead by 1663), daughter of William Morley & Monteagle

--Edward Cranfield, gentleman usher, gov. of New Hampshire from 1682-85

Does anybody know the identity of Gov. Cranfield's wife? Richard R. Johnson, "Robert Mason and the Coming of Royal Government to New England," _Historical New Hampshire_, vol. 35 no. 4 (Winter 1980): 377, suggests he may have been enticed in part to New Hampshire by the promise of marriage with one of Robert Tufton _als._ Mason's daughters: "... Mason pledged to reward him with a further portion of his dwindling assets, L150 a year out of future rents and his daughter's hand in marriage."
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-15 20:40:23 UTC
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The will of William Goodman, gent. of Brailes, Warwickshire, PROB 11/216/490 (1651), mentions "my Sister Marie Peesley" (20 shillings), sister Elizabeth Ball's children, sister Wilde's children, sister Mistress Isabell Goodman, thus clearly confirming that Mary (Goodman) Cranfield of the Northamptonshire family had remarried to a Peesley/ Peasley/ Peisley by the early 1650s. Later in the will Goodman gives an additional 50 pounds to Mary Peesley.

I don't see mention of any Cranfields, but the last page of the will, as provided by TNA, is that of a different testator (one proved by Elizabeth Guynes, widow, "relict of said deceased"). Goodman had named his wife Margery.

Someone may want to check what Ancestry offers.
JBrand
2018-06-16 18:02:08 UTC
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Sir Robert Southwell wrote in 1686 that Edward Cranfield told him "his grandfather was the first that discovered the gunpowder treason," and, as this was Lord Morley & Monteagle, father of Elizabeth Parker, wife of Cranfield, this line seems proved.

https://books.google.com/books?id=PcaILaxGx7oC&pg=PA169&dq=%22the+first+that+discovered+the+gunpowder%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjgi97Q4djbAhVNYK0KHaSFAsEQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=%22the%20first%20that%20discovered%20the%20gunpowder%22&f=false
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 13:22:29 UTC
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Dorothy Cranfield (Dorothea Cranfeild), wife of Francis Cranfield (son of Edward Cranfield, of Barbados and Hon. Elizabeth Parker) was buried on 19 August 1665, at St. James', Clerkenwell. She made a Will which was Probated on 8 February 1665. She was resident of Great St. Bartholomew, London.

I've had a look online and found the following baptisms that may be the correct family, all at St. Bride's, Fleet Street, London.

Spencer Cranfeild, chr. 13 July 1604, son of Nicholas
William Cranfield, chr. 3 Jan. 1605/6, son of Nicholas
Marie Cranfield, chr.
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 13:26:31 UTC
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Dorothy Cranfield (Dorothea Cranfeild), wife of Francis Cranfield (son of Edward Cranfield, of Barbados and Hon. Elizabeth Parker) was buried on 19 August 1665, at St. James', Clerkenwell. She made a Will which was Probated on 8 February 1665. She was resident of Great St. Bartholomew, London.

I've had a look online and found the following baptisms that may be the correct family, all at St. Bride's, Fleet Street, London.

Spencer Cranfeild, chr. 13 July 1604, son of Nicholas
William Cranfield, chr. 3 Jan. 1605/6, son of Nicholas
Marie Cranfield, chr. 6 Apr. 1606/7, dau. of Nicholas
Rebecca Cranfield, chr. 30 Jul. 1607, dau. of Nicholas
Edward Cranfeild, chr. 13 May 1613, son of Nichol/Nychol

This appears to be the children of Nicholas Cranfield and Mary Goodman.

There are further christenings in London around the same time but with a father Edward. Could Nicholas Cranfield have a brother Edward?

I hope this is of interest.

James R. Yeowell
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-18 16:29:15 UTC
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That seems logical.

Someone may want to look at the PCC will of 1656 for Francis Cranfield, in case this is another version of the Barbados will of 1654, or a separate will for the same man.

Dorothy Goodman, sister of Mary (Goodman) (Cranfield) Peisley and William Goodman, but not mentioned in William's will of 1651, was actually married to NICHOLAS Lockey, a London area painter or miniaturist.

https://books.google.com/books?id=IBOgAAAAMAAJ&dq=rowland+walpole+lockey&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=%22dorothy+goodman%22
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-18 17:51:46 UTC
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Possibly an earlier baptism for this couple:

St. Albans Abbey, Herts.

Aug. 9 [1600] Richard ['Nicolas' erased] sonne of Nicolas Cranfilde of London.

https://books.google.com/books?id=IToVAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA37&dq=nicholas+cranfilde&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjE_vqz4t3bAhWG2lMKHWHVCnYQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=nicholas%20cranfilde&f=false
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 18:55:46 UTC
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Excellent. Richard definitely appears to be the son of this couple.

There's also a marriage of a William Cranfeild to a Mary Goldsmith on 10 July 1650 at St. Bartholomew the Great, City of London. It's unclear whether this is the son of Nicholas Cranfield and Dorothy, or a very young William Cranfield, son of Edward Cranfield, of Barbados and Elizabeth Parker, or indeed no relation.

That's the same parish that Dorothy Cranfield, wife of Francis was resident in.
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 19:02:54 UTC
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There's a burial for a Richard Cranfeild on 11 October 1653 at St. Katherine by the Tower, London.

There's also a christening for an Edward Cranfeild on 3 August 1623 at Croydon, Surrey, son of Richard Cranfeild.

Of course, it is not proven this is the same Richard Cranfeild.
r***@yahoo.com
2018-06-18 19:21:53 UTC
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The will of Dame Elizabeth (Tresham), Lady Morley/ Monteagle exists, and is dated 1648 [PROB 11/203/312]. It mainly mentions Morleys and Savages, but does give to "Mrs Cranfield," and twice to "Mrs Merrill Cranfield" (at least, I think so).

Muriel Throckmorton, wife of Sir Thomas Tresham, was the mother of Dame Elizabeth Morley, so that is where "Merrill" comes from.
Brad Verity
2018-06-18 21:26:23 UTC
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Post by r***@yahoo.com
The will of Dame Elizabeth (Tresham), Lady Morley/ Monteagle exists, and is dated 1648 [PROB 11/203/312]. It mainly mentions Morleys and Savages, but does give to "Mrs Cranfield," and twice to "Mrs Merrill Cranfield" (at least, I think so).
Muriel Throckmorton, wife of Sir Thomas Tresham, was the mother of Dame Elizabeth Morley, so that is where "Merrill" comes from.
Just want to acknowledge the tremendous research done on this line since my initial post six(!!) years ago. Especially from John Brandon - great job, sir! If Gov. Cranfield isn't in the latest RD900, hopefully he'll make it into a future edition.

Cheers, ---Brad
JBrand
2018-06-19 12:55:51 UTC
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Post by Brad Verity
Post by r***@yahoo.com
The will of Dame Elizabeth (Tresham), Lady Morley/ Monteagle exists, and is dated 1648 [PROB 11/203/312]. It mainly mentions Morleys and Savages, but does give to "Mrs Cranfield," and twice to "Mrs Merrill Cranfield" (at least, I think so).
Muriel Throckmorton, wife of Sir Thomas Tresham, was the mother of Dame Elizabeth Morley, so that is where "Merrill" comes from.
Just want to acknowledge the tremendous research done on this line since my initial post six(!!) years ago. Especially from John Brandon - great job, sir! If Gov. Cranfield isn't in the latest RD900, hopefully he'll make it into a future edition.
Cheers, ---Brad
Thanks, Brad. It was running across the Goodman pedigree in the Northamptonshire Visitation and remembering the similarities to the relations named in the Barbados will that really got me started thinking about it.

No, this one is not in the current RD book. Your two main ones in there are Anne Talbot Darnall (spelled correctly, despite errors in the GPC promotional material) and Mary Jones Lloyd. Gary credits you for both.
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 18:47:53 UTC
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It's the same Francis Cranfeild.

The second part of the that snippet view from earlier reads:

"Ensign John Wise & Middleton Cooper - Xtrs in trust. signed Frances Cranfield
Wit: Robert (x) Sanderson, John (x) Reece
Proved 26 Mar 1656

Also:

Cranfeild, Francis, eldest son & heir to Edward Cranfeild of London, (Barbadoes) [beyond seas] 1656 282

A correction for Rebecca Cranfeild. She was christened 29 July 1607 and was buried the same day at St. Bride's, Fleet Street.
j***@googlemail.com
2018-06-18 22:27:51 UTC
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Although it's difficult to read, Edward Cranfeild's name is mentioned in Dorothy Cranfield's Will. The only other family member of note is "brother" Edward Lolle.

The only Edward Lolle I've found, married someone called Hester and had a daughter Hester Lolle, christened 20 January 1652 at St. Katherine by the Tower, London.
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