Discussion:
William Wordelworth of Penyston, yeoman, 1432
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Vance Mead
2017-06-17 05:43:43 UTC
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Here is an early entry in Common Pleas for Wordsworth/Wordelworth in Peniston, Yorks:

Easter term, 1432, second entry:
Yorks. Dean and canons of the free chapel within Westminster Palace, by John Lake, attorney, versus William Wordelworth of Penyston, yeoman, for trespass: breaking and entering an enclosure and house belonging to the dean and canons at Penyston, and carrying away goods and chattels worth 10 pounds at Langsyde and Thorleston.
Vance Mead
2017-06-17 05:45:47 UTC
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And the link (the fingers are faster than the brain):

http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT1/H6/CP40no685/bCP40no685dorses/IMG_1502.htm
Ian Goddard
2017-06-17 08:52:49 UTC
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Post by Vance Mead
Yorks. Dean and canons of the free chapel within Westminster Palace, by John Lake, attorney, versus William Wordelworth of Penyston, yeoman, for trespass: breaking and entering an enclosure and house belonging to the dean and canons at Penyston, and carrying away goods and chattels worth 10 pounds at Langsyde and Thorleston.
Thanks, Vance. I'll have to try to get the Wordsworths into my head
again to find out how a William fits in with those locations.
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Ian Goddard
2017-06-20 10:26:49 UTC
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Post by Ian Goddard
Post by Vance Mead
Yorks. Dean and canons of the free chapel within Westminster Palace,
by John Lake, attorney, versus William Wordelworth of Penyston,
yeoman, for trespass: breaking and entering an enclosure and house
belonging to the dean and canons at Penyston, and carrying away goods
and chattels worth 10 pounds at Langsyde and Thorleston.
Thanks, Vance. I'll have to try to get the Wordsworths into my head
again to find out how a William fits in with those locations.
I think this must have been the William Worldisworth alias William
Wordisworth of Penyston, 'yoman' in the patent roll of Henry VI v 3 p481
you mentioned here some time ago.

He would be the first William in succession to Nicholas in the
inscription quoted by Hunter in an appendix to Christopher Wordsworth's
“Memoirs of William Wordsworth, Poet-Laureate, D.C.L”:

Hoc opus fiebat A° Dni m ccccc xxv° ex sumptu Willmi Wordesworth filii
W. fil. Joh. Fil. W. fil. Nich. viri Elizabeth filiae et heredis W.
Proctor de Penyston Quorum aiabus Deus p'picietur

(This work was made in 1525 AD at the expense of William Wordsworth son
of W son of John son of W son of Nich husband of Elizabeth daughter and
heir of W Proctor of Penyston on whose soul may God have mercy.)

He is mentioned in the following from vol 1 of “Descriptive Catalogue of
Ancient Deeds in the Public Record Office”:

C. 864.
Grant by William de Hepworth, vicar of the church of Ruston, and Richard
Oxspring, of Cotheworth, to Elizabeth, late wife of Nicholas de
Wordesworth, of Penyston, of all their lands, tenements, &c, in the
vills of Penyston and Thurleston, except tenements called 'Copstorth,'
and 'le Scoles,' and land on the west of a brook called 'Penksyke,' in
the territory of Penyston, for her life; with remainder to her son
William and the heirs of his body, &c. Penyston, nativity of St. John
the Baptist, 1 Henry VI.

Apart from an Adam Wordelworth who I can't, so far, connect to anyone
Nicholas and Elizabeth seem to be the earliest known generation of
Wordsworths.
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