Discussion:
Attila the Hun's wives and children
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Dora Smith
2005-03-21 04:45:06 UTC
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I'm responding to this old post, found in the archives, while checking into the wives and children of Attila the Hun.
Does anyone have an inkling as to the descendants of Attila The Hun?
Here is what I found, but I am very sceptical about it, especially considering that
the name of Attila's daughter is unknown.
1-Attila The Hun (406-453)
sp: Julia Grata Honoria Of Rome (-)
2-Daughter of Attila (-)
sp: Ardaric Gepidae (-)
3-King Elemund Of The Ostrogoths (-)
4-Gepiade Of The Ostrogoths (-)
sp: King Wacho (-)
5-Waldrada (529-)
sp: Duke Garibaldi Of Bavaria (536-592)
6-Duke Tassilon I (558-609)
7-Duke Garibald II (608-625)
6-Romilde (abt 565-610)
sp: Duke Gisulf II (abt 552-610)
7-Lady Geila (abt 583-bef 673)
______________________________
------------------------------

Remember me? I wanted to know about the alleged daughter of Theodoric, raised by Flavius Aetius, in the movie Attila. (Which is still a favorite movie.) Eventually it emerged that she was imaginary.

OK, now remember Honoria, sister to the emperor? She existed - but Attila never married her. Not in the movie, and not in real life. This is the third or fourth time I've encountered this idea tonight. Honoria got into trouble for plotting with her butler against her brother. She was sent to Pulcheria's nunnery or whatever in Constantinople. She asked Attila to rescue her and offered half the Western Empire as her dowry. Attila used this as a pretext to invade teh Western Empire. Honoria was shipped back to Rome, maybe married to an elderly senator, and never heard from again.

Another one I keep running into - a notion that Ildico was Attila's fourth wife and bore one of his sons. Did he marry more than one Ildico? Ildico was the slave girl he had just married when he had his fatal nose bleed. They had no children- unless such children preceded the marriage by some years.

I'm outright confused about Ardaric Gepidae Guy. He turns up in more than one place in the history. He is variously supposed to be a member of Attila's court, a king who defeated Attila's sons, and a descendant of ATtila many generations down teh road and founder of the Lombard line?

Say, do I correctly understand that N'kara did not exist, either?

Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
Dora Smith
2005-03-21 05:11:18 UTC
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In David's post:

x. ATTILA "THE HUN" & "The Scourge", King of Huns [9] 437-453
had several wives: =1 Arykan; =2 Helche (Kreka); =3 Kriemhilt; =4
Ildiko (Hildiko); =5 Gundrun [note: a German myth says that his
Burgundian wife, Gundrun, murdered her twin sons, Erpe & Eiti,
begotten by him, and served their hearts for Attila to eat]
issue:

I had wondered why so many of Attila's wives had German names. Heh, heh,
heh.

Anyway, I have encountered this story several times tonight, but this is the
first time I've encountered such specifics.

Is tehre any chance those Burgundians and Franks had their stories of royal
madness and mayhem mixed up?

The Burgundian royal line was mad, and extremely bloodthirsty. The
Burgundian king hacked his entire family to death and threw them down a
well, except for two girls, who escaped. One of them was Clotilde, who had
joined a convent. THe Frankish prince Clovis kidnapped/ rescued her, with
her obvious collusion, and married her. She was quite an interesting
character in her own right. I think she may have toured the kingdom and
left a wake of towns in flames, in order to avenge whatever her current
obsession was, and she appears to have never dropped an obsession. They
had four sons, who grew up and fought for Clovis's former empire. Two of
the sons somehow got ahold of the two small sons of a third son. One of
them hacked the two small boys to death with a sword in front of the other,
screaming incoherently about it being his business. Subsequently the
entire Merovingian line became plagued by episodes of madness, and
ultimately became unable to rule. They were fond of marrying mad women,
too, like slave women who in time, for instance, tied a daughter between
two horses to be drowned in the river.

Alternatively, was this Gundrun or Gunrun a Burgundian princess?

Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
Dora Smith
2005-03-22 15:03:17 UTC
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Another of Attila's wives had more than one of the names of the women I've
seen listed as Attila's wives.

Kreka, who apparently was his most important wife, was also called Herrriche
and Herkja, as well as Helche - these were German versions of her name.

Does anyone know how we know he was actually married to Burgundian Princess?

Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dora Smith" <***@austin.rr.com>
To: "Dora Smith" <***@austin.rr.com>; <GEN-MEDIEVAL-***@rootsweb.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2005 11:11 PM
Subject: Re: Attila the Hun's wives and children
Post by Dora Smith
x. ATTILA "THE HUN" & "The Scourge", King of Huns [9] 437-453
had several wives: =1 Arykan; =2 Helche (Kreka); =3 Kriemhilt; =4
Ildiko (Hildiko); =5 Gundrun [note: a German myth says that his
Burgundian wife, Gundrun, murdered her twin sons, Erpe & Eiti,
begotten by him, and served their hearts for Attila to eat]
I had wondered why so many of Attila's wives had German names. Heh, heh,
heh.
Anyway, I have encountered this story several times tonight, but this is the
first time I've encountered such specifics.
Is tehre any chance those Burgundians and Franks had their stories of royal
madness and mayhem mixed up?
The Burgundian royal line was mad, and extremely bloodthirsty. The
Burgundian king hacked his entire family to death and threw them down a
well, except for two girls, who escaped. One of them was Clotilde, who had
joined a convent. THe Frankish prince Clovis kidnapped/ rescued her, with
her obvious collusion, and married her. She was quite an interesting
character in her own right. I think she may have toured the kingdom and
left a wake of towns in flames, in order to avenge whatever her current
obsession was, and she appears to have never dropped an obsession. They
had four sons, who grew up and fought for Clovis's former empire. Two of
the sons somehow got ahold of the two small sons of a third son. One of
them hacked the two small boys to death with a sword in front of the other,
screaming incoherently about it being his business. Subsequently the
entire Merovingian line became plagued by episodes of madness, and
ultimately became unable to rule. They were fond of marrying mad women,
too, like slave women who in time, for instance, tied a daughter between
two horses to be drowned in the river.
Alternatively, was this Gundrun or Gunrun a Burgundian princess?
Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
Jean-François BLANC
2005-03-22 15:43:38 UTC
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Post by Dora Smith
well, except for two girls, who escaped. One of them was Clotilde, who had
joined a convent. THe Frankish prince Clovis kidnapped/ rescued her, with
her obvious collusion, and married her. She was quite an interesting
character in her own right. I think she may have toured the kingdom and
left a wake of towns in flames, in order to avenge whatever her current
obsession was, and she appears to have never dropped an obsession. They
had four sons, who grew up and fought for Clovis's former empire.
No, Chlodweg's eldest son Theodoric (Thierry) was not Chrotechildis'.

JF Blanc

PS: A good site about Merovingians (and which will help you to brush
up your French) was Pierre Coste's
(http://users.skynet.be/pierre.coste), but it seems to be offline for
now.
Dora Smith
2005-03-21 05:14:53 UTC
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Here's another question about David's data.

m. Escam (Ascama) (daughter), wife of Ardaric, a Gepidae chief/king
issue of Ernak [13] (above) were

Now, according to this very old document written by a Roman diplomat who
visited Attila's court, Escam was the name of the father of a girl who
Attila was headed to Escam's village to marry. The document does not name
the girl.

Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dora Smith" <***@austin.rr.com>
To: <GEN-MEDIEVAL-***@rootsweb.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2005 10:44 PM
Subject: Attila the Hun's wives and children
Dora Smith
2005-03-21 08:08:50 UTC
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Kriemhilt and Gunrun show up in most genealogies of Attila's family that
I've seen, as separate individuals.

I don't quite have all the information yet, but examining the Germanic
versions of her story make it clear that Kriemhilt
(Chrenchildis)(Grimhild)(Kriemhilc) and Gunrun (Gudrun) were the same
person, and she was a Burgundian princess. Her brothers were three kings
of Burgundy or else a king and two princes. In the stories, atleast. In
real life, her brother the king lived at a different time!

Attila apparently had fairly close contact with the Burgundians, as well as
the Franks; he participated fully in their dynastic politics, took hostages
from among them, and that sort of thing. He may ahve conquered the
Burgundian territory.

There are several very different stories concerning her. She is the one who
allegedly killed her two sons and fed them to Attila. In all versions
that I've found, goings on in the Burgundian royal family rivalled the
goings on at the time of the early Merovingian kings. Actually, the story
is based on them. It puts famous and notorious kings from slightly
differnet points in history together and has them knowing and having contact
with each other.

All versions of what transpired with her as Attila's wife have Attila and
whatever sons he had by her caught in the middle of Burgundian royal family
dysfunction. She was variously trying to get revenge on her family, who
she tricked into coming to Attila's court, trying to get this and that at
Attila's expense, from revenge on him for something that went on with her
family, to the recovery of her first husband's treasure. In one case,
Attila is greedy for some kind of family treasure, and she tries to get
revenge on him by killing his two small sons and feeding them to Attila and
his guests. Then she kills Attila, and then she tries to kill herself, and
is rescued by some other king and lives happily ever after!

Atleast one version of Ildico's role in this could also have been part of
this. Apparently it was later in history as myths about both Attila and
Burgundian royalty began to grow that the notion that Ildico killed Attila
for revenge for whatever he had done to her family took shape. In some
places, she actually merged with the Burgundian princess in the popular
mind.

http://28.1911encyclopedia.org/K/KR/KRIEMHILD.htm

"According to Jordanes (c. 49), who takes his information from the
contemporary and trustworthy account of Priscus, Attila died o: a violent
hemorrhage at night, as he lay beside a girl namec Ildico (i.e. O. H. Ger.
Hildiko). The story got abroad that he lad perished by the hand'of a woman
in revenge for her relations lain by him; according to some (e.g. Saxo Poeta
and the Qued-inburg chronicle) it was her father whom she revenged; but when
the treacherous overthrow of the Burgundians by Attila lad become a theme
for epic poets, she figured as a Burgundian mncess, and her act as done in
revenge for her brothers. Now he name Hildiko is the diminutive of Hilda or
Hild, which again in accordance with a custom common enoughmay have jeen
used as an abbreviation of Grimhild (cf. Hildr for Bryn-hildr). It has been
suggested. (Symons, Heldensage, p. 55) that when the legend of the overthrow
of the Burgundians, which .ook place in 437, became attached to that of the
death of Attila ^453), Hild, the supposed sister of the Burgundian kings,
was dentified with the daemonic Grimhild, the sister of the mythical
Nibelung brothers, and thus helped the process by which the Nibelung myth
became fused with the historical story of the all of the Burgundian kingdom.
The older story, according to which Grimhild slays her husband Attila in
revenge for her Drothers, is preserved in the Norse tradition, though
Grimhild's Dart is played by Gudrun, a change probably due to the fact,
mentioned above, that the name Grimhild still retained in the north its
sinister significance. The name of Grimhild is trans-'erred to Gudrun's
mother, the " wise wife," a semi-daemonic igure, who brews the potion that
makes Sigurd forget his love :or Brunhild and his plighted troth. In the
Nibelungenlied, lowever, the primitive supremacy of the blood-tie has given
place to the more modern idea of the supremacy of the passion of love, arid
Kriemhild marries Attila (Etzel) in order to compass the death of her
brothers, in revenge for the murder of Siegfried. Theodor Abeling, who is
disposed to reject or minimize the mythical origins, further suggests a
confusion of the story of Attiia's wife Ildico with that of the murder of
Sigimund the Burgundian by the sons of Chrothildis, wife of Clovis."

http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/norseminor.html
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/nibelungs.html#Revenge
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/nibelungs.html
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/german.html#Attila

The Germanic stories mention Kreka, a first wife who these stories ahve dead
at the time when Gudrun/ Grimhild married Attila. These are versions that
were written at later dates by Christian people; so they don't really tell
us that Attila was not married to Kriemhild and Kreka at the same time.


Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
Dora Smith
2005-03-22 15:08:27 UTC
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If Kriemhelt married Attila after the death of Kreka, this must have
happened relatively late. Now, I think that the notion that Attila married
her after the death of Kreka could be a Christianization of the story. Not
wanting to say he marrie dmore than one woman at a time.

I am curious about the Roman envoy's report in 448. This is the year he
visited Attila's court. Exactly one wife, Kreka, and three sons, were
present.

I think envoy reported that Attila's eldest son was the governor of a wide
territory; not clear if this son was one of the three sons who dined with
Attila and the Roman envoys. But I'm not clear that that is who reported
tha tthe oldest son was governor of a wide territory.

Now, Attila died in 453. He should reasonably have been marrying by atleast
434, when he and his brother took the throne, and having children since
then.

Were the other wives and children in seclusion, or what?

Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
***@austin.rr.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dora Smith" <***@austin.rr.com>
To: <GEN-MEDIEVAL-***@rootsweb.com>
Sent: Monday, March 21, 2005 2:08 AM
Subject: Re: Attila the Hun's wives and children - Gudun and Kirembilt
Post by Dora Smith
Kriemhilt and Gunrun show up in most genealogies of Attila's family that
I've seen, as separate individuals.
I don't quite have all the information yet, but examining the Germanic
versions of her story make it clear that Kriemhilt
(Chrenchildis)(Grimhild)(Kriemhilc) and Gunrun (Gudrun) were the same
person, and she was a Burgundian princess. Her brothers were three kings
of Burgundy or else a king and two princes. In the stories, atleast. In
real life, her brother the king lived at a different time!
Attila apparently had fairly close contact with the Burgundians, as well as
the Franks; he participated fully in their dynastic politics, took hostages
from among them, and that sort of thing. He may ahve conquered the
Burgundian territory.
There are several very different stories concerning her. She is the one who
allegedly killed her two sons and fed them to Attila. In all versions
that I've found, goings on in the Burgundian royal family rivalled the
goings on at the time of the early Merovingian kings. Actually, the story
is based on them. It puts famous and notorious kings from slightly
differnet points in history together and has them knowing and having contact
with each other.
All versions of what transpired with her as Attila's wife have Attila and
whatever sons he had by her caught in the middle of Burgundian royal family
dysfunction. She was variously trying to get revenge on her family, who
she tricked into coming to Attila's court, trying to get this and that at
Attila's expense, from revenge on him for something that went on with her
family, to the recovery of her first husband's treasure. In one case,
Attila is greedy for some kind of family treasure, and she tries to get
revenge on him by killing his two small sons and feeding them to Attila and
his guests. Then she kills Attila, and then she tries to kill herself, and
is rescued by some other king and lives happily ever after!
Atleast one version of Ildico's role in this could also have been part of
this. Apparently it was later in history as myths about both Attila and
Burgundian royalty began to grow that the notion that Ildico killed Attila
for revenge for whatever he had done to her family took shape. In some
places, she actually merged with the Burgundian princess in the popular
mind.
http://28.1911encyclopedia.org/K/KR/KRIEMHILD.htm
"According to Jordanes (c. 49), who takes his information from the
contemporary and trustworthy account of Priscus, Attila died o: a violent
hemorrhage at night, as he lay beside a girl namec Ildico (i.e. O. H. Ger.
Hildiko). The story got abroad that he lad perished by the hand'of a woman
in revenge for her relations lain by him; according to some (e.g. Saxo Poeta
and the Qued-inburg chronicle) it was her father whom she revenged; but when
the treacherous overthrow of the Burgundians by Attila lad become a theme
for epic poets, she figured as a Burgundian mncess, and her act as done in
revenge for her brothers. Now he name Hildiko is the diminutive of Hilda or
Hild, which again in accordance with a custom common enoughmay have jeen
used as an abbreviation of Grimhild (cf. Hildr for Bryn-hildr). It has been
suggested. (Symons, Heldensage, p. 55) that when the legend of the overthrow
of the Burgundians, which .ook place in 437, became attached to that of the
death of Attila ^453), Hild, the supposed sister of the Burgundian kings,
was dentified with the daemonic Grimhild, the sister of the mythical
Nibelung brothers, and thus helped the process by which the Nibelung myth
became fused with the historical story of the all of the Burgundian kingdom.
The older story, according to which Grimhild slays her husband Attila in
revenge for her Drothers, is preserved in the Norse tradition, though
Grimhild's Dart is played by Gudrun, a change probably due to the fact,
mentioned above, that the name Grimhild still retained in the north its
sinister significance. The name of Grimhild is trans-'erred to Gudrun's
mother, the " wise wife," a semi-daemonic igure, who brews the potion that
makes Sigurd forget his love :or Brunhild and his plighted troth. In the
Nibelungenlied, lowever, the primitive supremacy of the blood-tie has given
place to the more modern idea of the supremacy of the passion of love, arid
Kriemhild marries Attila (Etzel) in order to compass the death of her
brothers, in revenge for the murder of Siegfried. Theodor Abeling, who is
disposed to reject or minimize the mythical origins, further suggests a
confusion of the story of Attiia's wife Ildico with that of the murder of
Sigimund the Burgundian by the sons of Chrothildis, wife of Clovis."
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/norseminor.html
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/nibelungs.html#Revenge
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/nibelungs.html
http://www.timelessmyths.com/norse/german.html#Attila
The Germanic stories mention Kreka, a first wife who these stories ahve dead
at the time when Gudrun/ Grimhild married Attila. These are versions that
were written at later dates by Christian people; so they don't really tell
us that Attila was not married to Kriemhild and Kreka at the same time.
Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
derek
2017-03-07 17:46:42 UTC
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he constantly raped and pillaged all, so yeah im sure he has kids
s***@d93mail.com
2018-05-13 14:57:30 UTC
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Post by derek
he constantly raped and pillaged all, so yeah im sure he has kids
your sure, how do u know

wjhonson
2017-03-07 19:30:03 UTC
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Things like this need documentation of *some sort*

Like maybe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
wjhonson
2017-03-07 19:37:12 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.

So the lines breaks there.
Paulo Canedo
2017-10-09 19:39:33 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.
So the lines breaks there.
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
wjhonson
2017-10-09 19:47:31 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.
So the lines breaks there.
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
Settipani had a lot of time on his hands to give credit to all sorts of spurious and download ridiculous claims.

You would think, if the Gepids could trace their ancestry to Attila, it might have been mentioned by someone before the 21st century.
wjhonson
2017-10-09 19:53:31 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.
So the lines breaks there.
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
Settipani had a lot of time on his hands to give credit to all sorts of spurious and download ridiculous claims.
You would think, if the Gepids could trace their ancestry to Attila, it might have been mentioned by someone before the 21st century.
I will go further and state that not only don't we know that Ardaric was *married* at all to anyone, or had any children. But we also do not know that Attila himself has any daughters whatsoever.

So that's an awfully hard row to hoe, but you're welcome to try harder.
Paulo Canedo
2017-10-09 19:55:56 UTC
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Post by wjhonson
Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.
So the lines breaks there.
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
Settipani had a lot of time on his hands to give credit to all sorts of spurious and download ridiculous claims.
You would think, if the Gepids could trace their ancestry to Attila, it might have been mentioned by someone before the 21st century.
Please let's remember Settipani is a respected genealogist among the academy.
wjhonson
2017-10-09 20:09:15 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by wjhonson
Post by Paulo Canedo
Post by wjhonson
Post by wjhonson
Things like this need documentation of *some sort*
Like maybe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardaric
As we can see Ardaric had neither parents, spouses, nor children, of which we have any record whatsoever.
So the lines breaks there.
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
Settipani had a lot of time on his hands to give credit to all sorts of spurious and download ridiculous claims.
You would think, if the Gepids could trace their ancestry to Attila, it might have been mentioned by someone before the 21st century.
Please let's remember Settipani is a respected genealogist among the academy.
There is no academy.
Settipani is a person who wrote a book.
He is subject to praise and ridicule the same as any other person.

Writing a book does not make you a respected genealogist.
Having worthwhile and cogent arguments is far more useful.

Basing a purported descent on nonsense and hand waving is not useful.
taf
2017-10-09 22:13:56 UTC
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Post by Paulo Canedo
Dear Will, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descent_from_antiquity#Attila_the_Hun_to_Charlemagne
in short Settipani mentions an old tradition that one of Ardaric's wifes was
Attila's daughter and he gives it some crediblity and he conjectures that the
later Gepid kings and nobles may have descended from that marriage.
In general, Wikipedia is not the best source for genealogy, but this page in particular is of very low quality.

taf
d***@gmail.com
2017-10-06 23:50:37 UTC
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Post by Dora Smith
I'm responding to this old post, found in the archives, while checking into the wives and children of Attila the Hun.
Does anyone have an inkling as to the descendants of Attila The Hun?
Here is what I found, but I am very sceptical about it, especially considering that
the name of Attila's daughter is unknown.
1-Attila The Hun (406-453)
sp: Julia Grata Honoria Of Rome (-)
2-Daughter of Attila (-)
sp: Ardaric Gepidae (-)
3-King Elemund Of The Ostrogoths (-)
4-Gepiade Of The Ostrogoths (-)
sp: King Wacho (-)
5-Waldrada (529-)
sp: Duke Garibaldi Of Bavaria (536-592)
6-Duke Tassilon I (558-609)
7-Duke Garibald II (608-625)
6-Romilde (abt 565-610)
sp: Duke Gisulf II (abt 552-610)
7-Lady Geila (abt 583-bef 673)
______________________________
------------------------------
Remember me? I wanted to know about the alleged daughter of Theodoric, raised by Flavius Aetius, in the movie Attila. (Which is still a favorite movie.) Eventually it emerged that she was imaginary.
OK, now remember Honoria, sister to the emperor? She existed - but Attila never married her. Not in the movie, and not in real life. This is the third or fourth time I've encountered this idea tonight. Honoria got into trouble for plotting with her butler against her brother. She was sent to Pulcheria's nunnery or whatever in Constantinople. She asked Attila to rescue her and offered half the Western Empire as her dowry. Attila used this as a pretext to invade teh Western Empire. Honoria was shipped back to Rome, maybe married to an elderly senator, and never heard from again.
Another one I keep running into - a notion that Ildico was Attila's fourth wife and bore one of his sons. Did he marry more than one Ildico? Ildico was the slave girl he had just married when he had his fatal nose bleed. They had no children- unless such children preceded the marriage by some years.
I'm outright confused about Ardaric Gepidae Guy. He turns up in more than one place in the history. He is variously supposed to be a member of Attila's court, a king who defeated Attila's sons, and a descendant of ATtila many generations down teh road and founder of the Lombard line?
Say, do I correctly understand that N'kara did not exist, either?
Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
You have forgotten his last wife , the Queen of Burgundy .. Kriemhild , which married him after the death /murder of her late husband King Siegfried of Xanten and Burgundy - The Rhineland . The Rhineland was first roman Empire -West -Roman Empire and later French Kingdom - Burgundy 2--- this is a celtic ,slawic ,french story ..
wjhonson
2017-10-09 16:31:51 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by Dora Smith
I'm responding to this old post, found in the archives, while checking into the wives and children of Attila the Hun.
Does anyone have an inkling as to the descendants of Attila The Hun?
Here is what I found, but I am very sceptical about it, especially considering that
the name of Attila's daughter is unknown.
1-Attila The Hun (406-453)
sp: Julia Grata Honoria Of Rome (-)
2-Daughter of Attila (-)
sp: Ardaric Gepidae (-)
3-King Elemund Of The Ostrogoths (-)
4-Gepiade Of The Ostrogoths (-)
sp: King Wacho (-)
5-Waldrada (529-)
sp: Duke Garibaldi Of Bavaria (536-592)
6-Duke Tassilon I (558-609)
7-Duke Garibald II (608-625)
6-Romilde (abt 565-610)
sp: Duke Gisulf II (abt 552-610)
7-Lady Geila (abt 583-bef 673)
______________________________
------------------------------
Remember me? I wanted to know about the alleged daughter of Theodoric, raised by Flavius Aetius, in the movie Attila. (Which is still a favorite movie.) Eventually it emerged that she was imaginary.
OK, now remember Honoria, sister to the emperor? She existed - but Attila never married her. Not in the movie, and not in real life. This is the third or fourth time I've encountered this idea tonight. Honoria got into trouble for plotting with her butler against her brother. She was sent to Pulcheria's nunnery or whatever in Constantinople. She asked Attila to rescue her and offered half the Western Empire as her dowry. Attila used this as a pretext to invade teh Western Empire. Honoria was shipped back to Rome, maybe married to an elderly senator, and never heard from again.
Another one I keep running into - a notion that Ildico was Attila's fourth wife and bore one of his sons. Did he marry more than one Ildico? Ildico was the slave girl he had just married when he had his fatal nose bleed. They had no children- unless such children preceded the marriage by some years.
I'm outright confused about Ardaric Gepidae Guy. He turns up in more than one place in the history. He is variously supposed to be a member of Attila's court, a king who defeated Attila's sons, and a descendant of ATtila many generations down teh road and founder of the Lombard line?
Say, do I correctly understand that N'kara did not exist, either?
Yours,
Dora Smith
Austin, Texas
You have forgotten his last wife , the Queen of Burgundy .. Kriemhild , which married him after the death /murder of her late husband King Siegfried of Xanten and Burgundy - The Rhineland . The Rhineland was first roman Empire -West -Roman Empire and later French Kingdom - Burgundy 2--- this is a celtic ,slawic ,french story ..
I hope you are being facetious.
This marriage is entirely fiction.
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